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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

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TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2006 ANNUAL REPORT 




PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ANTMAL INSPECTION 107 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 102 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 42 

BUILDING DIVISION 42 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 44 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 43 

HEALTH DIVISION 45 

PLANNING DIVISION 48 

PLUMBING, GAS & SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 43 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 50 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DF/ISION 71 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 10 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 14 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 74 

FINANCE & BUDGET 22 

ASSESSORS 24 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 22 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 24 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 25 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 113 

FIRE-RESCUE DEPARTMENT 39 

FOUNDERS' DAY 19 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 100 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 109 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 15 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 18 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 92 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 108 

MARGARET G. TO WLE FUND 108 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 31 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 53 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 54 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 54 

FORESTRY 60 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 61 

PARKS & GROUNDS 59 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 60 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 60 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 35 

ANIMAL CONTROL 37 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 36 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 37 

OPERATIONS DWISION 35 

RECORDS DIVISION 36 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 105 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 64 

ENGINEERING 64 

HIGHWAY 65 

SEWER 66 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 66 

WATER 67 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 88 

TOWN CLERK 28 

TOWN COUNSEL 27 

TOWN MANAGER 4 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 132 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 110 

VETERANS SERVICES 82 

WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 189 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 78 



Town of Andover 

Board of Selectmen 



2006 




2005 Board of Selectmen, from left to right: John P. Hess; Mary K. Lyman; 
Ted E. Teichert; Alex J. Vispoli, Chairman; and Brain P. Major 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures 

of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and energy 

allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.oov 



Dear Fellow Citizens: 

It has been my pleasure and honor to have served you as Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen over the past year. Fiscal Year 2006 has brought continued challenges, transition, and 
progress to our Town. While some things were unexpected, and others well planned, the Town 
has met them all with a unified sense of mission and commitment to community. Here's just a 
few notable things that happened last year: 

The 2006 Annual Town Meeting, that time-honored tradition of citizen government, was 
successfully conducted over the course of three days in late April and early May. Although there 
was disagreement over the School Department budget, and voters approved a higher amount than 
the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended, ultimately, service cuts were 
avoided and the overall Town budget was brought into balance with the help of Andover's 
legislative delegation and additional state aid. School and Town officials have continued to work 
together to maintain services at a time when our fiscal resources are stretched to the limit on a 
yearly basis. 

The Mother's Day Flood that occurred in late May as a result of record-breaking rains 
was a significant challenge for the Town. This natural disaster displaced hundreds of people in 
Andover and throughout the Merrimack Valley, and left millions of dollars of property damage 
and months of recovery in its wake. Yet, the initial impact of this major event was lessened by 
the swift and effective response of the Town's public safety and public works personnel; and the 
recovery effort was expedited by the dedicated staff of the inspectional services divisions. In 
fact, all of Andover came together during that trying time in a myriad of ways, both big and 
small, to help fellow citizens in their time of need - that's what "community" is all about. 

It has been a productive year for land planning initiatives. The Tri-Town Task Force 
made up of representatives from Andover, Wilmington, and Tewksbury was formed and worked 
together to craft a unified plan for the further economic development of the Lowell Junction 
Commercial/Industrial Area, including a new federally-funded 1-93 interchange, and the long 
needed mitigation of commuter traffic through the Ballardvalle section of town. This significant 
regional planning effort, which the Board of Selectmen has prioritized, will help map out 
Andover's future economic growth, and carry-on the Town's long tradition of proactive and 
visionary land-use planning for the benefit of future generations. 

The year 2006 also brought the regrettable but well-deserved retirements of a number of 
Andover's well-known public servants. Town Moderator James D. Doherty, Sr. has helped 
shape Andover in so many ways, and in so many capacities, that it is nearly impossible to do him 



justice in this brief letter. Jim's three decades of faithful service as Andover's Town Moderator is 
just one of the many significant contributions he has made to this community. Another Andover 
native son, Fire Chief, Charles H. Mumane, Jr., passed the torch after thirty-eight years of 
professional service to the Town and community. The fact that there has been a Murnane in the 
Andover fire service since 1912 speaks volumes about the dedication and tradition of service of 
this remarkable family. Chief Murnane has been succeeded by Michael B. Mansfield, a very 
capable career fire professional who previously served as the Assistant Fire Chief for the City of 
Nashua, New Hampshire. Planning Director Stephen Colyer and Health Director Everett Penney 
also retired after many years service to the Town. They are succeeded by Paul Materazzo and 
Thomas Carbone respectively. 

Looking forward, Andover faces many difficult challenges in the years ahead. Our town 
is evolving and changing in many ways. To manage these changes, we must continue to seek a 
balance between preserving Andover's small-town character while fostering economic growth; 
regulating undesirable land uses while maintaining the rights of property owners; and providing 
high quality programs and services within available resources. Meeting these and other big 
challenges will require creative thinking, cooperative problem-solving, and decision-making by 
Town officials and voters alike. I have no doubt that we will meet these things head on, and 
together make our community a better place to live, work, and raise our families. On behalf of 
the Board of Selectmen, I thank you for your continued interest, involvement, and participation 
in your Town government. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Alexander J. Vispoli, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

www.andoverma.gov 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

The Town of Andover experienced the wrath of Mother Nature over Mother's Day 
weekend in early May. In forty-eight hours over twelve inches of rain fell inundating the 
wetlands and low lying areas all over Town. It is estimated that one hundred and fifty families 
had to be evacuated from their homes along the Shawsheen River near North Main Street. The 
public schools were closed for two days. Some say this was the worst natural disaster 
experienced in Andover since the floods of 1936. Despite the challenging weather, there was no 
loss of life. This is attributed to the outstanding performance by the Town departments and 
residents who responded so well in this time of crisis. 

Andover has a long and proud heritage of public service. The response to the Mother's 
Day flood is one example. In an effort to honor those citizens who gave so selflessly of 
themselves, the Virginia Cole Community Service award was initiated in 2001. Long-time 
resident Dorothy Bresnahan was the 2006 recipient of this award. She was recognized for her 
many contributions to the Town as a twenty-year member of the Council on Aging, an active 
member of the Haven organization, Director of Volunteers at Lawrence General Hospital, Senior 
Center volunteer and advocate and, most recently, serving as the Council on Aging's liaison to 
the Senior Center Task Force. 

At the Annual Town Election in March, Brian P. Major and Ted E. Teichert were re- 
elected to the Board of Selectmen and Anthony H. James and Arthur H. Barber were returned to 
the School Committee. Daniel T. Grams was elected to the Andover Housing Authority 
following the retirement of Ronald C. Hajj who served for twenty-two years. James D. Doherty 
was re-elected to his 29 th term as Town Moderator. The 2006 Annual Town Meeting was to be 
his last as he announced his retirement prior to the 2007 Annual Town Election. Mr. Doherty is 
a true son of Andover living here his entire life and serving the community in countless ways. 
The St. Augustine's Church and School, Merrimack College, the Kiwanis Club, the Democratic 
Town Committee and the Town are just a few of the organizations he actively supports. Jim's 
picture graces the cover of this 2006 Annual Town Report to honor his twenty-nine years as 
Moderator and over seventy-three years of faithful and dedicated service to the Town. 

In 2006, three senior Town employees passed away. Kenneth H. Parker, Jr., 
Superintendent of Building Maintenance in the Plant and Facilities Department, served the Town 
for over twenty-five years. Helmut M. Lutsch, Tree Climber also in the Plant and Facilities 
Department, served the Town for over twenty-eight years. Patrolman James E. Haggerty, Police 



Department, served the citizens of Andover for over twenty-four years. These men have left 
behind a legacy of public service that is truly admirable. 

The Board of Selectmen and all the elected and appointed officials deserve a hearty 
"thank you" for devoting so much of their time and talent for the good of Andover. This 
community cannot function as a well-run Town without their dedicated public service. Also, a 
hearty "job well done" goes to Selectman Ted Teichert who chaired the Board of Selectmen 
from January through April and to Selectman Alex Vispoli who chaired the Board for the 
remainder of the year. Their wise counsel and tireless enthusiasm for Andover is an inspiration 
to all. 

Finally, please remember to participate in Andover' s tradition of voting in the Annual 
Town Election on Tuesday, March 27 th and the Annual Town Meeting at the Andover High 
School Richard J. Collins Field House on Monday and Tuesday, April 23 rd and 24 th and, if 
needed, Monday, April 30 th at the Collins Center. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1 .3 Maintain the Town's infrastructure 

1.4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 .5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1 .7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1 .8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2.1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3 . 1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment of 
trust and honesty 

4.1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 - Respect cultural and 
economic diversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6.1 Celebrate Andover' s unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge, flood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scale, 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andover its small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern ourselves in a manner that encourages 
participation by all, that consistently provides adequate 
information for making informed choices, and that acts to 
preserve our investment and the interests of the community as a 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of others and consider 
compromises that are in the best interest of the Town and 
region. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 



HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover's historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover's many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



2004 Andover National Citizen Survey Summary 

In the Spring of 2004 the Town of Andover conducted the National Citizen Survey (NCS) process. 
The NCS is a standardized, professionally administered, local public opinion survey instrument 
developed by the International City Management Association (ICMA) and a panel of experts to be 
broadly applicable to any city or town. The NCS has been conducted by more than 300 communities 
across the country, and has won a number of awards for excellence. It assesses public opinion on a 
wide variety of municipal services and quality of life issues. 

The Andover NCS was mailed to a random sampling of 1,200 households in March 2004 using the 
U.S. Postal Service's residential address listing. Completed surveys were returned by 646 residents, 
representing a 56% response rate. The results of the survey represent a statistically valid sampling of 
the opinions of the overall Andover community at-large. The survey's margin of error was +/- 5%, 
with a 95% level of confidence that the results would be similar if every residence in Andover 
responded to the survey. Listed below are summaries of the key findings of the survey: 



Top 10 Ten Quality Ratings 

1. Ambulance/EMS Services 

2. Fire Services 

3. Public Library Services 

4. Andover as a Place to Live 

5. Andover as a Place to Raise Children 

6. Police Services 

7. Trash Collection 

8. Neighborhood as a Place to Live 

9. Recycling 

10. Town Employee Courtesy 



Lowest 10 Quality Ratings 

1 . Access to Affordable Housing 

2. Services to Low-income People 

3. Amount of Public Parking 

4. Ease of Bus Travel 

5. Street Repair 

6. Sidewalk Maintenance 

7. Andover as a Place to Retire 

8. Access to Affordable Child Care 

9. Land Use, Planning, and Zoning 

10. Bus/Transit Services 



Top 5 Town of Andover Values 

1 . Protect the Safety of Persons and Property 

2. Maintain the High Quality of Education 

3. Maintain the Town's Infrastructure 

4. Encourage an Ethical and Honest 
Environment 

5. Provide Accessible, Fair, and Equitable 
Services 



Top 5 Reasons for Moving/Remaining 
in Andover 

1 . Property Values/Investment 

2. Public Schools 

3. Geographic Location/Accessibility 

4. Small Town Ambiance and Lifestyle 

5. Town Services 



The results of Andover' s NCS are not surprising. Andover received most of its highest "quality" 
ratings in areas typically associated with affluent suburbs; and most of its lowest ratings for services 
more often associated with urban communities. 

The full results of the NCS are provided in two separate reports - one explains the survey's 
methodology and shows the ratings for all the questions in graphical and tabular formats; the other is a 
normative report that compares Andover' s results against the averages of other communities across the 
U.S. Andover's nation-wide comparative results in the 65 areas surveyed were as follows: 50 areas 
were above average; 8 areas were average; and 5 areas were below average. Both reports and results 
summaries are available on the Town's website at http://andoverma.gov/publish/ncsurvey.php 



The Town intends to use the results of the NCS as a reference source for reshaping existing and 
developing new municipal programs, activities and services that meet the needs and expectations of the 
residents of Andover. The Town also plans to conduct the NCS every 3 to 5 years in order to assess 
changes in community opinion over time. 8 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 
several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; 4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2006 





ELECTED 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Alexander J. Vispoli, Ch. 


-2007 


John P. Hess 


-2007 


Mary K. Lyman 


-2008 


Ted E. Teichert 


-2009 


Brian P. Major 


-2009 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 




James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2009 


Janice Burkholder 


-2007 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2010 


Daniel T. Grams 


-2011 


Calvin A. Deyermond* 


-2011 



* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of Executive 
Office of Communities and Development 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Anthony H. James, Ch. - 2009 

Richard J. Collins - 2007 

Debra R. Silberstein - 2007 

David S. Samuels - 2008 

Arthur H. Barber - 2009 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. - 2008 
Michael Condon, Methuen - 2007 

Kenneth Hemck, Methuen - 2007 

Richard Hamilton, Jr., Lawrence- 2008 
John Dnscoll, North Andover - 2008 
Daniel Fleming, Lawrence - 2008 

Gerald H. Silverman, Andover - 2009 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Norman C. Frost 
Donna C Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 



-2009 
-2009 
-2009 
-2009 
-2009 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty - 2007 



CORNELL FUND TRUSTEES 



Barbara Brandt-Saret 


-2007 


Edward Morrissey 


-2009 


Vacant 


-2008 



10 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 


-2009 


Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 


-2008 


Stuart Jon Stumpf 


-2007 


Paul J. Finger 


-2007 


Richard T. Howe 


-2008 


Philip Sutherland 


-2007 


Margaret M. Bradshaw 


-2008 


Howard M. Kassler 


-2008 


Harold J. Wright 


-2009 


Gail Ralston 


-2009 


Timothy L. Felter 


-2009 


Michael Walsh 


-2009 


Mark Merritt 


-2007 


Marcia J. Miller 


-2009 


Mary O'Donoghue 


-2007 


Robert A. Pustell - Emeritus 




Cynthia Milne 


-2008 






ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Stephen D. Anderson, Ch. 


'- 2008 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2009 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2007 


Dennis Ingram 


-2007 


Paul Bevacqua 


-2007 


Lynn Smiledge 


-2007 


Peter F. Reilly 


-2008 


Margaret Salafia 


-2007 


David W. Brown - Associate 


-2008 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2008 


Lynne S. Batchelder - Associate 


-2009 


Leslie Frost 


-2008 


Nancy K. Jeton - Associate 


-2009 


James S. Batchelder 


-2009 


PLANNING BOARD 




MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 


-2007 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2008 


John J. McDonnell 


-2008 


Carolyn Fantini 


-2007 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2008 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2007 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2009 


Mark N. Spencer 


-2009 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2009 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2009 


Selena Goldberg - Associate 


-2010 


Frank Castle 


-2009 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Candace Martin, Ch. 


-2007 


John R. Petty, Ch. 


-2008 


Margaret Kruse 


-2008 


Bruce Symmes 


-2007 


Dr. Donald Miller 


-2009 


Dennis M. Adams 


-2009 


BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DIST. 


COMM. 


PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 


James Sheldon, Ch. 


-2007 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2007 


Diane R. Derby 


-2008 


John C. Doherty 


-2007 


Sherry Kirby 


-2008 


John J. Lewis 


-2007 


Ron Abraham 


-2009 


Joseph D. McCloskey 


-2007 


Bruce S. Taylor 


-2009 


James M. Deyermond 


-2007 


Mary Bogan 


-2007 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2007 


Lynn Smiledge 


-2009 


James F. Bedford 


-2007 


Michael J. Ristuccia - Alternate 


-2008 






LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TR1 

Dr. Paul Caselle, Ch. 


JSTEES 


Christian C. Huntress 


-2008 


-2008 


Douglas White 


-2008 


John S. Bigelow 


-2008 


John E. Corey, Jr. 


-2008 


Joyce M. Ritterhaus 


-2007 


Alexander Chanler 


-2008 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2009 



11 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 




HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


Justin J. Coppola, Ch. 


-2008 


Joan Duff, Ch. 


-2008 


Jami Cope 


-2007 


Susan Garth Stott 


-2008 


Bernadette Lionetta 


-2007 


Victoria Johnston 


-2008 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2007 


Bruce R. Sorota 


-2009 


Donna Gorzela 


-2008 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2008 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2009 


Sarah B. Young 


-2007 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2008 


Lorene A. Comeau - Emeritus 




Patricia Commane 


-2008 


Christopher D. Haynes - Emeritus 




Julie Pike 


-2007 






CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




RETIREMENT BOARD 




John R. Dempsey. Ch. 


-2008 


James Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2008 


John B. Flynn 


-2007 


Elena Kothman 


-2007 


Barbara Worcester 


-2009 


John C. Doherty 


-2009 


Gerald H. Silverman 


-2008 


Frank G. Castle 


-2009 


Zeff Marusich 


-2009 


Rodney P. Smith 


- Open 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




DESIGN REVIEW TASK FORCE 




Alan Michel, Ch. 


-2007 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2007 


Keith Sherman 


-2008 


Ann E. Constantnine 


-2007 


Shelley Selwyn 


-2007 


Margaret Salafia 


-2007 


Denise Johnson 


-2008 


James S. Batchelder 


-2007 


Stefani T. Goldshein 


-2007 


Paulette Zuena 


-2007 


Mark Spencer 


-2007 


Stephen E. Stapinski 


-2007 


Susie Novick 


-2008 


Lisa Nardone 


-2007 


Jennifer Cullen-Struhl 


-2007 


Craig Gibson 


-2007 


Donald W. Robb 


-2009 


Alex J. Vispoh, Selectmen Rep. 


-2007 


Norman Rice 


-2007 


Lisa Schwarz, Planner 


-2007 


SCHOOL FACILITIES TASK FORCE 


TRIAD COUNCIL 




Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2008 


Nancy A. Bailey, Co-Ch. 


-2009 


Ruth A. Galvin 


-2008 


Ethel A. Olsen, Co-Ch. 


-2009 


Alexandra Dnscoll 


-2008 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2009 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2008 


Richard Tyler 


-2009 


Dennis F. Forgue 


-2008 


Martin Boroian 


-2009 


Diane Costagliola 


-2008 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2009 


HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




Kimberly Sousa, Ch. 


-2009 


Candy Dann, Ch. 


-2009 


Linda A. O'Connell 


-2007 


Marya Chapin Lundgren 


-2007 


Carolyn Hall Finlay 


-2007 


James T. Curtis 


-2007 


Joan Duff 


-2007 


Anthony Connell 


-2007 


Reginald S. Stapczynski 


- 2009 


Glenn A. Rogers, Jr. 


-2009 


ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 




BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Barbara Brandt-Saret 


-2008 


William T. Downs 


-2007 


John R. Petty 


-2008 


Carolyn Simko 


-2008 


David J. Reilly 


-2008 


Ronald C. Hajj 


-2009 


YOUTH COUNCIL 




VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 




Colleen Georgian 


-2008 


John C. Doherty 


-2007 



12 



FISHBROOK WATERSHED ADV. CQMM. 



SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 



Ronald A. Clausen 


-2008 


David J. Reilly 


-2007 


John F. Zipeto 


-2008 


Cynthia J. Milne 


-2007 


David J. Adilman 


-2008 


Kathleen M. Hess 


-2007 


Richard A. Bizzozero 


-2008 


Norman Rice 


-2007 


Stephen S. Boynton 


-2008 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2007 


Gail Rayner Mann 


-2008 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2007 


Thomas E. Brady 


-2008 






Patricia M. Donohue 


-2008 






COUNCIL ON AGING 




MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 




Susan D. McKelhget, Co-Ch. 


-2008 


Clifford T. Markell, Ch. 


-2007 


Judith G. Trerotola, Co-Ch. 


-2009 


John R. Daher 


-2007 


Burt M. Pinney 


-2008 


Judith F. Wnght 


-2007 


Robert J. Schreiber, M.D. 


-2007 


Abigail O'Hara 


-2007 


Vicki P. Coderre 


-2008 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2007 


Nancy Mulvey 


-2009 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2007 


Christopher Sintros 


-2008 


John C. Campbell 


-2007 


Mary L. Ryan 


-2008 


John A. Simko 


-2007 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2007 


Karen M. Herman 


-2007 


Nancy S. Gump 


-2007 


Gary S. Finlayson 


-2007 


Mary Jane Bausemer 


-2009 


Steven J. Druth 


-2007 


Patricia D' Ambra Tovey 


-2007 






Warren A. Rehe 


-2007 


TOWLE FUND TRUSTEES 




Jo-Ann Deso 


-2009 


Philip F. Sullivan 


-2009 






Donna Dyer 


-2007 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 




Donald L. Thompson 


-2009 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2007 






Judith E. Holt 


-2008 


IND. DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2007 


Michael W. Moms, Esq., Ch. 


-2009 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2008 


Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 


-2007 


Lynn W. Smiledge 


-2009 


John E. Shuman 


-2007 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 


KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 




Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2007 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 


-2007 


INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 




MBTA ADVISORY BOARD REP. 




Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 


-2007 


Jeremiah J. O'Sullivan, Esq. 


-2008 


GR. LAWRENCE COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 


GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 


Judith M. Yelle 


-2009 


DPW Director John A. Petkus, Jr. 


-2007 


MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Planning Director Paul T. Materazzo - 2007 
Senior Planner Lisa L. Schwarz, Alternate Member 



Paul J. Salafia 

John J. McDonnell, Alternate Member 



-2007 



IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 

Water Treatment Plant Supt. John Pollano - 2007 



13 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Veterans Service Agent 

Youth Services Director 



Thomas G. Carbone 

Paul T. Materazzo 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

Charles H. Mumane, Jr. 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Randy H. Pickersgill 
Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

John C. Doherty 

William D. Fahey 



14 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 



Mailing Address: Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 



Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



Telephone Numbers: 



8:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M. Monday -Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



POLICE/FERE-RESCUE - EMERGENCY 

Fire-Rescue Department - Business 

Police Department - Business 

Animal Control Officer 

DCS Classes & Activities 

Department of Public Works 

Human Resources Office 

Memorial Hall Library 

Senior Center 

Superintendent of Schools 



911 

978-623-8466 

978-475-0411 

978-475-0411 ext. 1103 

978-623-8273/8274 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8530 

978-623-8400 

978-623-8321 

978-623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: http: -■' '■www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 32,249 



Square Miles: 



Town Meeting and Election: 

Voter Registration Information: 
Andover's Tax Rate: 

When are Taxes Due: 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,877 controlled by the Conservation Commission 

1,200 owned by A.V.I.S. 

889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. 
Annual Town Meeting is generally held four weeks 
following the Town Election. 

Call Town Clerk's Office at 978-623-8255 

$1 1.25 - Residential and Open Space 

$18.33 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1 st - November 1 st - February 1 st - May 1 st 



15 



Excise Tax Information: Call the Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



Recycling Information: 
Questions: 
Curbside Pick-up: 



Call the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 

Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup 
day. Recyclable material inclusive of glass (all colors, steel & tin 
cans, aluminum containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable 
paper products include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office 
paper, paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and 
corrugated containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and 
fold boxes, cartons & other pieces of cardboard into 2'x2'xl' 
bundles - then tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 



Complaints/Information: 



Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 or 

the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 or e-mail 

at dpw-business:a, andoverma.gov . 



Compost Site: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. 
Clippings must be removed from container used to transport for 
dumping. All contaminated loads will be rejected. Fines will be 
assessed for illegal dumping. Open year round for walk-ins. 
Drive-ins announced in local newspapers and on Town's website. 



Rubbish Information: 



Curbside Pickup : 



Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Household rubbish is limited to 6 bags or barrels per residence. 
One bulky item is allowed per week in addition to household trash. 



Complaints or Inquiries: 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Call Allied Waste/BFI at 1-800-442-9006 or 

the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 or e-mail 

at dpw -business^ -andoverma.uov . 

Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 
their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. 
Suggestions for disposal: hire a private contractor or check 
with the company where your new appliance was 
. purchased to see if they will take the old appliance. 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaint: Call the Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



Pothole Claims: 



Submit a letter to the Town Manager's Office within thirty days of the 
date of the incident or contact the office at 978-623-8225 with any 
questions. 



16 



Where to Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 



Birth Certificate 



Building Permits 



Facilities Coordinator 



Town Clerk's Office 



Building Division 



978-623-8450 



978-623-8255 



978-623-8301 



(construction, plumbing, gas, electrical) (Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 
Business Certificate Town Clerk's Office 978-623-8255 



Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 

Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning Bylaw Variance 



Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

and/or 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 



Town Clerk's Office 
Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Town Manager's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Building Division 

and/or 

Board of Appeals Office 



978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8301 

978-623-8315 



17 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 

United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

sonator;fr.kcnnedv.scnate.go\ 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, 10 1 ' 1 Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 

617-565-8519 

362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-2742 

johnketrv <xkerrv.senate.com 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 1 852 

978-459-0101 

2447 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

martin.mcchama mail.housc. eov 

State Senator: 



Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-1612 

stuckena senate.state. ma.us 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 473B, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2676 

rep.barryfinegoldfohou.state.ma.us 

Barbara A. LTtahen(D) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1, 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 26, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-2080 

rep.barbararitalienfahou.state.ma.us 

18 



FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 11. 2006 

FOUNDERS ' DA Y WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 
THE DA TE OF THE TO WN 'S INCORPORA TION ON MAY 6, 1 646. 

HONORING TOWN AND SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 
WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



30 Years of Service: 



Wanda E. Batchelder, Public Safety 
Kevin J. Hale, Highway Department 
Donald Swenson, Highway Department 



Marilyn Demers, Library 

Arthur J. Ricci, Police Department 

Kevin J. Winters, Police Department 



25 Years of Service: 



Leslie Baskin, Library William E. Canane, Police Department 

Barbara Connolly Kiley, Police Department Richard J. Hartman, Fire Department 
Lesley J. Hewett, Police Department Kenneth H. Parker, Plant & Facilities 

John N. Pathiakis, Police Department Everett F. Penney, CD&P, Health Division 

Rodney P. Smith, Town Accountant 



20 Years of Service: 



Cecilia K. Blais, Police Department 
Albert G. DelDotto, Fire Department 
Daniel N. Guillet, Fire Department 
Daniel G. Igoe, Police Department 
Barbara D. Morache, Information Systems 
Peter R. Nowell, Highway Department 
Dennis P. Sheehan, Collector/Treasurer 
Eric J. Teichert, Fire Department 



Mary Jane Burwell, Information Systems 
Kaija M. Gilmore, CD&P, Building Division 
Paul G. Hinds, Department of Public Works 
Stephen F. Migliori, Dept. of Public Works 
Mary Ellen Morkeski, Police Department 
Clifford Pattullo, Fire Department 
Dennis H. Sullivan, Fire Department 
Katherine Urquhart, Elder Services 



15 Years of Service: 



Alan D. Carifio, Water Department 
Cynthia A. Vaughn, Water Department 



Rita Marconi, Human Resources 



10 Years of Service: 



Ryan T. Beal, Fire Department 
Robin L. Cataldo, Police Department 
Charles E. Edgerly, Police Department 
Timothy M. Hagerty, Police Department 
Brian Landry, Fire Department 
Glen K. Ota, Police Department 
Kimberly A. Stamas, Community Services 



Patricia A. Becker, Elder Services 

Linda L. Cleary, CD&P, Conservation Division 

Michael A. Giammasi, Fire Department 

Barbara A. Hood, Public Safety 

Leo P. Lynch, Plant & Facilities 

Carl L. Starosciak, Plant & Facilities 



19 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



35 Years of Service: 



Helen G. Briggs, West Elementary School 
Katherine V. Iworsley, High Plain Elem. 
Kenneth P. Maglio, West Middle School 
Cynthia H. Verda, Business Office 



Kerry A. Costello, Andover High School 
Richard P. Loschi, West Middle School 
Sarah G. O'Brien, Andover High School 
Marcia E.T. Young, High Plain Elem. School 



30 Years of Service: 



Charles D. Croteau, Sanborn Elem. School John H. Fawcett, Andover High School 
David B. Nichols, Andover High School Diane Stefanelli, West Elementary School 
Timothy B. Thomas, Andover High School Synthia S. Weiss, Bancroft Elementary School 



25 Years of Service: 



Eileen Shaw, High Plain Elementary School Theresa E. Palardy, Doherty Middle School 



20 Years of Service: 



Peter J. Anderson, Andover High School 
Leslie Demers, Food Services 
Patricia Ann Hajj, Fine Arts/Health Ed. 
Dolores Laughlin, West Middle School 
Thomas E. Meyers, Andover High School 
Chandler B. Parker, Andover High School 
Eileen Woods, South Elementary School 



15 Years of Service: 



Nancy Lundgren, Sanborn Elem. School 
Peter Otis, High Plain Elem. School 
Mary E. Routhier, South Elem. School 
Mary C. Wermers, PE/ Athletics 



Joyce Cullen, West Elementary School 
Dolores Dunning, Andover High School 
Antonia Kulscar, South Elementary School 
Dorothy McCormick, Sanborn Elem. School 
Bethany M. Orlando, Sanborn Elem. School 
Nancy Walke, Doherty Middle School 
Evelyn C. Wrobel, West Elementary School 



Mary Moran, Andover High School 
Joyce Rawlinson, High Plain Elem. School 
Patricia Spring, High Plain Elem. School 



10 Years of Service: 



Linda Anderson, Bancroft Elem. School 
Michelle L. Baer, West Middle School 
Marjorie Britton, Shawsheen Elem. School 
Susan Choquette, Andover High School 
Ellen Gaudiano, Andover High School 
Cynthia R. Girard, High Plain Elem. School 
Nancy Hood, West Elementary School 
Siv Kremer, High Plain Elementary School 
Carol S. Martini, Andover High School 
Jean Murphy, Sanborn Elementary School 
Cynthia Pilla, Andover High School 
Denise Russell, Doherty Middle School 
Mary-Beth Smith, Shawsheen Elem. School 
Timothy Van Wey, Andover High School 



Roger L. Bachand, Technology 
Constance M. Barber, South Elem. School 
Deirdre R. Carty, High Plain Elem. School 
Frederic Froburg, Andover High School 
James G. Gioia, West Elementary School 
Susan Halpem, Shawsheen Elementary School 
Ann Kirwin, West Elementary School 
Kim Lieberman, Wood Hill Middle School 
Kenneth Matteucci, Doherty Middle School 
Deborah Navarro, Bancorft Elementary School 
Stephanie L. Ragucci, Andover High School 
Stephen J. Sanborn, Andover High School 
Raymond Tode, Technology 
Jonathan Wachs, Andover High School 



20 



TOWN RETIREMENTS: 

Meredith J. Barlow, Town Clerk 

Stephen L. Colyer, Community Development & Planning - Planning Division 

Phyllis A. Furey, Food Service 

Robert T. Gallant, Plant & Facilities 

William E. Morris, Fire Department 

Everett F. Penney, Jr., Community Development & Planning - Health Division 

Craig F. Poirier, Police Department 

Mark J. Reilly, Plant & Facilities 

Anthony F. Vallante, Police Department 



SCHOOL RETIREMENTS: 



Veronica M. Boutureira, West Middle School 
Jane Duffley, South Elementary School 
Nancy P. Ghirardini, Shawsheen Elementary School 
Robert J. Kessler, Sanborn Elementary School 
Robert C. Littlefield, Doherty Middle School 
Walter E. Marcille, FA/HE/PE 
Norah M. McCarthy, Wood Hill Middle School 
Floyd J. McManus, Doherty Middle School 
Chester J. Orban, Andover High School 
Mary V. Pitochelli, South Elementary School 
Carolyn Redmond, Sanborn Elementary School 
James Redmond, West Middle School 
Maria C. Salvia, Andover High School 
Marilyn A. Santagati, Andover High School 
Kathleen M. Scanlon, Andover High School 
Eileen M. Shannon, Andover High School 
David J. Silva, Bancroft Elementary School 
Kathy St. Amand, West Elementary School 
David C. Swanson, South Elementary School 
Charles O. Wettergreen, Andover High School 
Judith G. White, West Middle School 
Barbara J. Whiteside, Sanborn Elementary School 
Elsie S. Wu, High Plain Elementary School 
Joan Zenofsky, Wood High Middle School 



21 



FINANCE A. RTIDCFT DFPARTMFNT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 

FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2006 Budget was released on February 3, 
2006. During the months of February, March, and April meetings were held with the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 11,300 households. The 
Annual Town Meeting began on Monday, April 24, 2006 and the Fiscal Year 2007 operating 
budget (Article 4 and Article 5) was adopted in the amount of $122,787,701 . This budget was an 
increase of 5.6% from the Fiscal Year 2006 operating budget of $1 16,31 1,208. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2006 are as follows: 

Provided staff support to the Budget Planning group. 

Prepared Town Manager's Recommended FY2007 Budget. 

Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY2008 - FY2012. 

Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

Produced 2006 Finance Committee Report. 

Completed the Andover Cable Advisory Committee license renewal negotiations with 

Verizon for new cable service in Andover. 

Worked with staff, financial advisor and Moody's Investors Service to maintain 

Andover' s Aaa bond rating. 

TFNTRAI PURCHASING 

In 2006, the Purchasing Division processed 1,559 purchase orders and 2,129 requests for 
payment for the Town and 3,284 purchase orders and 53 requests for payment for the School 
Department. During this period there were approximately 37 bids, 4 requests for proposals and 6 
Request for Written Responses that were advertised and officially opened. The continued 
utilization of the State bid contracts available to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits 
to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 2006, Andover initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as 
well as participated in a number of bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General 
Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the 
bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, road 
salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, office supplies, equipment and furniture, 
and school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

22 



Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 2006 were: 



Water Purification Facilities Filter Rehabilitation 

Refurbish Toilets at Andover High School 

One new 2005/2006 or Current Model Year Full-Size Van 

One New Custom Built 1500 GPM Triple Combination Pumper for Andover Fire 

Department 

Essex Street Bridge Rehabilitation 

Scholar Supplies 

Sidewalk Reconstruction - Chestnut Street, Whittier Street and North Main Street 

Physical Education Supplies & Equipment 

Athletic Supplies 

Custodian Supplies 

Re-roofing Selected Area and Related Work at West Elementary School 

Selected Areas of Roof Replacement and Related Work at the Bancroft School 

Elevator Cylinder Replacement at the Water Purification Facilities 

Miscellaneous Road Materials & Aggregates (Annual Requirements) 

Miscellaneous Roadway Construction and Paving Projects (Annual Requirements) 

Periodical Subscription Services for Memorial Hall Library 

Miscellaneous Grocery Products for Andover Public Schools and Senior Center 

Miscellaneous Paper Products for Andover Public Schools and Senior Center 

Pizza for Andover Public Schools 

Beverages and Vending Items for Andover Public Schools 

School Bus Transportation Contract - Extra Curricular Field Trip & Athletic 

Transportation 

Five new 2007 Model Marked Law Enforcement Full Size Sedans and One New 2007 

Model Administrative Full Size Sedan with Street Appearance Package 

Polyester Fiber Reinforced Crackfill (Annual Requirements) 

Dense Graded Crushed Stone and Bituminous Materials (Annual Requirements) 

Miscellaneous Roadway Paving and Wheelchair Ramps (Annual Requirements) 

One new 2006/2007 Model Year Cab and Chassis with 2-3 Cu. Yd. Dump Body 

Cooperative Bid for Highway Road Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

One new 2007 or Current Model Year F450 Four Wheel Drive 16000 GVW Cab & 

Chassis with Crane and Dumping Platform Body 

One new Parking Control Patrol Vehicle 

New Pay and Display Parking Automatic Ticket Machines 

Repairs to Masonry Stairs at Andover Town Offices 

Senior Center Aerobics Floor 

One new 2006 or Current Model Year Four Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis with 2-3 Cu. 

Yd. Dump Body 



The Purchasing Division is also responsible for administering the contract compliance of 
Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty insurance 
and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Human Resources Department, 
however, handles the Health and Personal insurance for both Town and School Departments. 



23 



The Purchasing Department is also responsible for overseeing our current insurance company's 
Rewards Program that helps control and reduce losses along with providing future savings on 
insurance premiums. The Town of Andover again this year received a plaque from our insurance 
company, Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), recognizing the Town for its 
High Achievement under their Loss Control Program. Participation in the MELA Rewards 
Program earned the Town a $25,641.00 credit reducing this past year's insurance premium by 
that amount. The Purchasing Department also processed approximately 49 casualty and property 
claims over the year and was able to recover $1 18,922.41 for the Town. 

rOMFrTO R/TRFASTIRFR 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Highlights during 2006 are as follows: 

Revised and implemented procedures for on-line payments of real estate property tax 

bills. 

Successfully processed and collected over 50,000 real estate and personal property tax 

bills, 32,000 excise tax bills and 25,000 water/sewer bills. 

Borrowed $7,220,000 bond anticipation notes for Town projects at 3.5287% for 1 

year. 

Borrowed $9,245,000 general obligation bonds for Town and School at 3.914% over 

20 years. 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization. The Andover chapter was 
formed in 1997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1997 Annual Town Meeting. During the 
year, several fundraising events were held and donations were received from many Andover 
residents that resulted in the awarding of forty-five scholarships in the amount of $43,000 to 
deserving Andover students pursuing further education. 

Balance: January 1 , 2006 $556,815 

Income, Donations, Gifts 59,437 

Expenses, Scholarships 44,579 

Balance: December 3 1 , 2006 $571,673 

ASSFSSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing all real estate and personal property 
accounts and motor vehicle excise taxes in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of these 
taxes. The three-member board is also responsible for the awarding nearly 250 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled 
veterans, widows and widowers and individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three years) 
basis. A revaluation was completed for Fiscal Year 2006. Interim adjustments were made in 
Fiscal Year 2007 and will be made again in Fiscal Year 2008 with another revaluation in Fiscal 



24 



Year 2009. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amount of property and ownership related information 
that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on all property 
and the valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on the Town's 
web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received and 
processed on an annual basis. 

INFORMATI ON SYSTFMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 
the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations. 

Highlights during the year include the following: 

Automated the Water/Sewer special bill process to increase efficiency and streamline 

processing. 

Continued to upgrade/replace the desktop hardware as part of an ongoing 

maintenance/replacement plan. 

Substantially increased content on employee intranet to expand internal 

communication and access to information, especially for employees on other town 

networks. 

Improved reporting and tracking of the multi-phased Sewer Betterment project. 

Encouraged employees to conserve technology-related energy use via power 

management utilities and other energy- savings measures. 



25 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



32,100 
31,800 
31,500 
31,200 
30,900 
30,600 
30,300 
30,000 
29,700 
29,400 
29,100 



MOTOR VEHICLE BILLS 




29,382 



C\* -cO' 



c^ ^ 



S? f f f f f T 1 1r 



PURCHASE ORDERS 



6,000 5,873 

5,800 

5,600 

5,400 

5,200 

5,000 

4,800 

4,600 

4,400 

4,200 

4,000 



5,710, 



5,094 



5,6215,602 



5,085 



5,434 

n 



4,616 



4,981 



\ v > 



N* 



# c^ S c§^ c^ <$>* c^ 5 c$ 
^ T? v nP i? nr T? 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



51,400,000 



$1,200,000 
$1,000,000 
$800,000 
$600,000 
$400,000 
$200,000 



fa, ro v 
«»■ P-. I — . 



^ J& _CV> 



•v , s^ , n> , T J T J T , 1> , 1> J 1r 



r«P 



TOWN WEBSITE VISITS 
(Mthly. Avg.) 



21154 




<f N # ^ # ^ ^ ,/ ^ ^ 



26 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2006, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles and attended all Town 
Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. Many 
easements were drafted for the on-going expansion of the Town's sewer system. 

Two properties which were owned by Reichhold Chemical Co were purchased by the 
Town. Town Counsel successfully represented the Zoning Board of Appeals in the Supreme 
Judicial Court case of Standerwick vs. Andover Zoning Board of Appeals in which the Court 
dismissed a challenge to a comprehensive permit issued by the Board of Appeals. Regulations 
were drafted for various Town Boards to require an applicant to pay consultant fees to enable the 
Board to hire experts to review engineering designs and calculations and other technical 
submissions of applicants. 

Several requests for public records were reviewed and discussed with the Office of the 
Commonwealth's Supervisor of Public Records. Town Counsel assisted the Planning Board in 
its effort to make substantial modifications to its Subdivision Rules and Regulations. Advice 
was provided to the Conservation Commission and Zoning Board of Appeals relating to a highly 
publicized swimming pool cabana which was proposed by a residential landowner. Various deed 
restrictions and regulatory agreements were reviewed for affordable housing and comprehensive 
permit projects. 



27 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the community 
and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



During 2006, the Town Clerk's Office managed a Town Election, the Annual Town Meeting, 
a State Primary and the November State Election. 

Since 2006 was a State election year, most of the office's resources were taken up with the 
Town's annual census, training pollworkers, absentee balloting, voter registration, working with 
candidates and providing election information to the public. 

With the changes in the passport requirements, the end of the year was very busy with 
accommodating families applying for passports. 

The office is in the process of completing a record disaster plan for the Town Offices and 
have added new inventories to the growing list of record inventories of Town records. This 
continues to provide better access for those researching the Town's records. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

Town Census 

In January 2006, the Town Census was mailed to 1 2,297 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the census was 29,310. 

Election/Voter Registration 

The year ended with 19,656 active registered voters in nine precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1-2,125 
Precinct 4 -1,969 
Precinct 7 - 2,244 



Precinct 2 -2,127 
Precinct 5 -2,190 
Precinct 8 - 2,355 



Precinct 3 - 2,255 
Precinct 6 -2,168 
Precinct 9 - 2,223 



Election 

Town Election 
State Primary Election 
State Election 
Annual Town Meeting 



Date 



No. Voted % of Voters 



March 28, 2006 2,610 


13% 


September 19, 2006 4,959 


26% 


November 7, 2006 13,482 


70% 


April 24, 25 & May 1 , 2006 1 ,393* 


7% 



first night's attendance 



28 



2004 



2005 



2006 



Recordings 

Births Recorded 

Marriages Recorded 

Deaths Recorded 

Dog Licenses Sold 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 

Business Certificates 

New Voter Registrations 

Passport Applications 



302 


289 


258 


169 


133 


114 


252 


260 


290 


2272 


2230 


2400 


296 


265 


266 


177 


123 


107 


2611 


931 


1501 


1200 


797 


825 



Fees Collected 



Marriage Licenses 

Certified Copies 

Uniform Commercial Code Filings* 

Miscellaneous Licenses Income 

Liquor Licenses Income 

Business Certificate Filings 

Miscellaneous Income 

Passport Fees 

Dog Licenses 

Non Criminal Violations 

Copy of Public Records 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 



4,300.00 
17,897.00 

2,506.04 
12,390.00 
95,470.00 

5,410.00 

4,490.71 
36,000.00 
20,822.00 

3,675.00 
282.35 



3,400.00 
16,538.00 

1,946.73 
13,560.00 
94,700.00 

3,740.00 

4,342.95 
23,910.00 
22,210.00 

4,250.00 
309.30 



2,875.00 

18,779.00 

143.00* 

12,075.00 

112,520.00 

4,635.00 

4,116.95 

24,750.00 

25,499.00 

11,175.00 

174.00 



7 ,767.10 ** 7,391.50 *** 7,173.45 **** 



TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED 



$211,010.20 $196,298.48 $223,915.40 



As of July 1, 2001, all U.C.C. Filings are filed and processed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Cities and towns will receive a decreasing percentage of funds from the 
Secretary of State for a period of five years. 



** 



$7,638.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $128.35 were 
retained by the Town. 



*** $7,265.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $126.25 were 
retained by the Town. 

**** 7,049.00 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $124.45 were 
retained by the Town. 



29 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



FEE REVENUES 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



o 
in 
m 



rn in oo 



10 IN 



X 



est- _cv> 



VVT , T J VT 3 'V , 'lirT J 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 



200 

190 

180 

170 

160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 




cO' _cv> 



s? 



V V 1? 



- $4 



DOG LICENSES 




400 



s? 



•? V 



# $> ^ 4 



VITAL RECORDS & PASSPORTS 



4,000 jtm 




rd- cv> 



cfc 



VVVT ,/ V 3 1> , T > V1> J 



D Vitals 



I Passports 



30 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is the informational, educational, and cultural heart of the 
Andover community. The library is the place of first resort for traditional and innovative library 
materials, services, and programs. It also serves as a community platform for information-based 
technological innovation. The library continually strives to maintain a standard of exceptional 
service that contributes to a higher quality of life for all members of the community at every 
stage of their lives. 

Everyone understands the importance of helping children learn to read. As a result, 
services to children and families are a critical part of the library's mission. To support this goal, 
the Library seeks to provide the space, programs and services needed and wanted by parents to 
meet the reading readiness needs of all of Andover's pre-reading children. Today's changing 
families, pressured by the demands of modern society, are requesting a wide variety of Library 
programs presented mornings, afternoons, evenings and on weekends. Our Children's Room 
doesn't have enough staff to meet this need. Our major budgetary goal for the next fiscal year is 
to increase by 10 hours the amount of Staff Librarian time dedicated to reading programs for 
children. 

Some highlights of 2006 are: 

The Children's Room continued its active program of services for preschool and 
elementary age children including additional story time sessions to meet the ever 
increasing demand for programs for children Birth - age 3. New programs for school 
age children were introduced, such as "Be a Reader" for beginning readers ages 6 and 
7. The room was re-organized, shelves and collections were moved and new themed 
carpets were purchased to help make a new early readers corner for beginning 
readers, and a larger preschool area to accommodate users and their families. 

The Information Technology (IT) Department continued to supply background 
services that kept the library online 100% of the time in 2006. The IT staff also 
carried out many projects that are improving technology-based services for the 
community including the following: 

~ Planned new design for building-wide wireless access 

~ Installation of the Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server (part of 

wireless design plan) 
~ Creation of Andover Answers wiki 
~ Changes to website including the set up of blogs for the Director and Teen Room 

and a Amazon Associates account to supplement Friends' income. 

The Circulation Department worked with the IT staff to implement changes that 
streamline the checkout process. Along with the Technical Services and Processing 
Department they implemented a program, OVERDRIVE, that allowed library patrons 
to download books from home. Circulation was increased overall with "Books on 
CD" up by 36% and DVDs up by 1 7%. 



31 



The Reference Department worked on the project Andover Answers - the wiki. It is a 
collection of information about Andover that the staff of Memorial Hall Library has 
gathered over the years. With 199 articles so far, the library staff invites your 
participation in creating this treasure trove of information on Andover. Check it out 
at: www.mnl.org/answers/index.php?title=Categorv:Andover_Answers_Index . 

Over 8,000 people attended 140 programs offered by the Community Services 
Department. The Library's month-long series on fishing attracted the most attendees 
with concerts and other programs on crafts and genealogy also attracting many 
attendees. The Friends of the Library had another record setting year raising money 
to support library programs. Nearly 9,000 hours were volunteered. 

MHL's Teen Room has become the place to go after school for Andover's Teens. 
Despite a staff limitations, the library has continued to expand the variety of programs 
offered. The following are just some of the year's highlights: 

~ Teen Poetry Contest in May - more than 300 poems were submitted. The 
winning poems were printed and distributed at the library and on the website. A 
podcast of the poets reading their winning poems was available on the Library's 
website. 

~ July/August - Teen Summer Reading Program - more than 1 00 teens participated 
in "Food for Thought" the Teen Summer Reading Program. Sixty students 
registered at the kick-off ice cream sundae party. More than 45 programs were 
held over the summer for middle and high school students. 

~ August - The Library supported the middle schools by holding a book discussion 
group on the book Fever, 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson. 

~ Fall - More than 20 teens attended an anime and manga drawing class. 

- The Otaku Sensei Anime and Manga Club has grown to nearly a dozen students. 

~ Andover's Teen Idol Contest in the Fall 06 had more than a dozen singers 
competing for the title of Andover's Teen Idol. More than 100 people came out to 
watch the shows. 

The Friends of the Memorial Hall Library provided incredible support through its 
sponsorships of library programs and services and raised more than $30,000 through 
its book sales and jazz concerts. 

The Trustees of Memorial Hall Library continue to provide the oversight and 
planning necessary that makes MHL such a thriving Library. 

As with years past, the Director wishes to finish this report by thanking the Trustees, Friends, 
Staff and everyone in Andover who uses the Library. Memorial Hall Library is truly at the heart 
of the community. 



32 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 



CIRCULATION 



183,533 


188,430 


196,015 


153,571 


144,231 


140,209 


135,874 


125,505 


129,008 


39,560 


36,775 


32,879 


39,699 


49,037 


58,486 


5,418 


5,559 


7,165 



Adult Print Circulation 
Children's Print Circulation 

Adult Non-print Circulation 
Children's Non-print Circulation 

Adult Network Transfers 
Children's Network Transfers 

TOTAL CIRCULATION 557,655 549,537 563,762 



OTHER STATISTICS 

Reference Questions 

Electronic Database Use 

PC and Internet Sessions 

Programs 

Program Attendance 

Meeting Room Use 

Reserves Placed 

ILL Loan Requests Received 

ILL Loan Requests Filled 

Volunteer Hours 

Visitors to the Library* 



56,992 


59,618 


61,919 


19,923 


24,461 


25,587 


51,744 


52,948 


54,454 


403 


414 


497 


12,969 


14,551 


16,110 


579 


678 


663 


69,049 


76,028 


85,329 


68,764 


72,834 


74,728 


30,915 


45,041 


50,512 


8,488 


8,621 


8,917 


418,463 


414,765 


426,248 



*Based on sample counts four times a year 



33 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



450,000 
400,000 
350,000 
300,000 
250,000 
200,000 
150,000 
100,000 
50,000 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 



1 I | | | | | I 



■ 1 ■ ■ 

$ s s £ 

ts a s 5 



01 

? i 



in 

in |m 

oq 

r»i co Ln 

0O OO BO DO 



S* 



,/ # # ^ ,/ J 



D Adult 



I Children 



55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 



PC & INTERNET USE 

51.744 54 45 4 




d# <& <& <& <& <$> <& <$> # 



J 



70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 



REFERENCE QUESTIONS 



919 




V V 



r\V cCl- 



f f f f f V t 



^ 



200,000 

175,000 

150,000 

125,000 

100,000 

75,000 

50,000 

25,000 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 



i 



I 



iHHlH 



II 



m K9 

o 

LD 

ui I?! 



^ 



V 



cn* j& 



c& 



D Adult ■ Children 



34 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public safety 
and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods are 
maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes integrity, 
honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment that values 
differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department encourages citizen 
input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between the community and 
the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone 
within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 3 1 ,827 incidents in 2006 - a slight decrease from 2005. There were 
622 arrests, 353 larcenies and 60 burglaries. 

The Town experienced an increase in arrests and all categories of reported crimes were down 
except domestic violence and vandalism. 

The Department issued 5,766 motor vehicle citations during the year which is a slight 
increase from 2005. There were 971 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department - a 4% 
decrease from the previous year. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, agencies and 
the community throughout the year. The Sub-Station, located on Grandview Terrace, continued to 
allow the Department to form a partnership with the residents at the Andover Housing Authority and 
the Youth Services Department through the New Horizons for Youth Program, which the 
Department has taken over funding for since the expiration of the grant. The Sub-Station at 
Brookside Estates had to be closed for budgetary reasons. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and Memorial 
Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the Feaster Five Road 
Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held throughout the year. 



35 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This service 
enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as well as to the entire 
community. 

The Police Department received more than $9 1 ,6 1 7 in new grant money during 2006. These 
grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel and other 
resources. Equipment grants allowed the Department to provide car safety seats and bicycle helmets 
to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such safety items. Emergency equipment such as 
tent shelters, body armor, gas masks, pumps and generators, protective screening, defibrillators and 
other emergency communication equipment were also purchased with this grant money. Highway 
Safety grants allowed for extra patrols, participation in two MSP Sobriety Checkpoints and 
enforcement around high accident locations. 

The Court Section processed a total of 622 arrests and 669 summons. This included tracking 
all Police Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' appearances in 
court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other Town Departments 
such as the Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up of investigations conducted by the 
agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was created in 
response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active role in 
combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. In addition, two officers were trained in technical 
services such as fingerprint identification techniques and crime scene processing and four officers 
were trained in rape investigation. The Division also has one investigator assigned as a Juvenile 
Officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators of 
numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 60 burglaries, 4 rapes and 353 larcenies. 
The Police Department experienced a decrease in the number of all reported crime categories this 
year with the exception of vandalism and domestic violence, which both saw slight increases from 
previous years. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. They recognize this new aspect of 
Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of the 
Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 



36 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 769 calls for service in 2006. He responded to 3 1 1 dog 
complaints and impounded 78 dogs and 2 cats. He also removed 1 54 deceased animals. In addition 
to these removed animals, there were 64 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA), the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI"s Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the regional Local Emergency Planning 
Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any hazardous 
materials incident. 

The Chief of Police also sits on the Commonwealth's Northeast Homeland Security Regional 
Advisory Council. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They are a 
very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a resource. 



37 



POLICE STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



70 
60 

50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




-frf>9 








V44 






34 /*^ 
^V30 ^\? 2 


..22 

•■ 19- 


19 .'-.24 \l8^22 
■--■'17 \^ ^* 18 
"■ in' 14- ._ n 




■ 1U . .y 

•■ 6 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



-♦ — Motor Vehicles 



- Bicycles 



DOMESTIC ABUSE 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 



11249 







360 
340 
320 
300 
280 
260 
240 
220 
200 
180 
160 
140 
120 
100 



237 



VANDALISM 



301 



n 



192 188 



236 

m^2T6~214" "217 



185- 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



38 



FIRE - RESCUE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to protect the lives and property of the 
citizens of Andover as well as the people who work in and visit our Community. 

To achieve its mission, the organization strives to prevent loss to property from fire and non- 
fire related activities through inspections, training, public education and code enforcement. Andover 
Fire Rescue also provides emergency medical services for those who are sick or injured. 

Andover Fire Rescue personnel also provide programs that increase fire safety awareness 
among area citizens annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, 
industries and businesses. 



2004 



2005 



2006 



TOTAL INCIDENTS : 
Fires 

EMS Calls 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 
Hazardous Conditions 
False Alarms & False Calls 
Miscellaneous Alarms 
Good Intent Calls 
Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 
Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 
Fire Prevention Activities 
Service Calls 
Training 
Co-Activation 

PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED : 
Smoke Detectors 
Report Copies 
Blasting Permits 
Cutting/Welding Permits 
Dumpster Permits 
Fireworks Display Permits 
Gunpowder Storage Permits 
Liquid Gas Storage Permits 
Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 
Miscellaneous Permits 
Open Air Burning Permits 
Oil Burner Install Permits 
Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 
Special Suppression System Permits 



9,651 


10,052 


9,616 


1,028 


1,279 


1,159 


2,514 


2,632 


2,743 


253 


265 


279 


109 


227 


258 


744 


814 


796 


303 


192 


25 


117 


141 


130 


21 


21 


26 


50 


48 


41 


2,135 


1,730 


1,658 


2,231 


2,421 


2,159 


121 


225 


265 


25 


57 


77 


2,047 


2,158 


1,933 


840 


1,038 


718 


82 


57 


62 


68 


44 


9 


24 


24 


18 


143 


104 


169 


1 


1 


2 


3 








53 


95 


74 


2 


9 


34 


2 


10 


17 


487 


437 


517 


138 


110 


124 


78 


80 


56 


2 


9 


10 



39 



2004 



2005 



2006 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (Cont.) 

Sprinkler Install Permits 
Underground Tank Re-certification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



52 


69 


66 


11 


10 


8 


53 


41 


49 











8 


20 






FEES COLLECTED: 



Ambulance Fees (FY) 
Permits/Licenses: 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



$719,437 


$753,300 


$802,616 


S 42,035 


$ 45,590 


$63,915 


$ 16,000 


$ 4,000 


$0 



PERSONNEL: 



74 



72.5 



72 



FACILITIES: 



APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT 



Fire Administration 

Public Safety Center, 32 North Main Street 

Fire Prevention Office 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street 



1 Command Vehicle 



1 Staff Vehicle 



Central Station 

Public Safety Center, 32 North Main Street 



2 Ambulances (1 in reserve) 
2 Aerial Ladders 
2 Engines (1 in reserve) 
2 Marine Units 

1 Forestry Unit 

2 Staff Vehicles 

1 Air support Unit 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



1 Ambulance 

1 Engine 

1 Fire Alarm Communications Unit 

1 Forestry Unit 

2 Marine Units 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 Engine 

2 Marine Units 



40 



FIRE STATISTICS 



FIRE CALLS 



800 r 

700 

600 

500 

400 

300 

200 

100 






fN 



c*b 



r\V cO' _cv> 



o 



cfe 



VVTVTVVVV 



DAndover 



I Mutual Aid 



000 
800 
600 
400 
200 
000 
800 
600 
400 
200 
000 



AMBULANCE TRANSPORTS 



VO U"> 






00 

-o f 

ID 



C& 



•F 



CV' -CV> 



eft 



f T 1 ^^ f t 1 f f 



DANDOVER 



I MUTUAL 



J 



PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 



1,600 

1,400 

1,200 

1,000 

800 

600 

400 

200 



cr» rv g ^ ax. 

H^"° n n ■ ^ 

III 

— «■ o o 

S ^ ""> ~, CT> -h 'T ~-< °° 

^ H IN ^ N 00 j-c 

l_l LJ l_l l_l 



rft 



rsN .tCu 



eft 



^•^^O^On^nJO^O^ 



□ SMOKE 



I OPEN 



DDUMP 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




295 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



41 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town 's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, BallardVale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) submitted with 
applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other applicable 
activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required site 
inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Division assists other Community 
Development and Planning Divisions, as needed, in their permit processing and enforcement and 
attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board and other 
Commission/Committee meetings. 

Building permits in the amount of $2 1,41 1 related to the May Mother's Day Flood were 
issued gratis. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 







2004 


2005 


2006 


New Dwellings 




74 


46 


22 


Additions/Alternations to Single Family 










Dwellings 




905 


880 


948 


New Multi-family Dwellings 




15 


6 


6 


Additions/Alterations to Multi-Family Dwellings 


72 


38 


56 


New Commercial & Industrial Buildings 




3 


4 


4 


Additions/Alternations to Commercial & 










Industrial Buildings 




150 


120 


167 


Schools/Public Buildings 




10 


— 


9 


Swimming Pools 




45 


28 


37 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodbuming Stoves & 










Raze Permits 




142 


102 


107 


Certificates of Inspection 




30 


33 


31 


Zoning Verification 




— 


— 


82 


Fees Collected 


$1,745,573 


$1,182,640 


$1,286,960 


Total Estimated Value 


$161,101,959 


$108,649,645 


$160,987,024 



42 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

ELECTRICAL STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Electrical Permits 1,280 1,245 1,235 

Fees Collected $182,964 $228,452 $158,026 

PLUMBING, GAS FITTING AND SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conduced as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 

PLUMBING, GAS AND SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Plumbing Permits 

Plumbing Fees Collected 

Gas Permits 

Gas Fees Collected 

Seals 

Seal Fees Collected $80 $260 $1,425 



903 


851 


821 


$63,374 


$71,317 


$50,943 


649 


685 


702 


$30,360 


$38,581 


$34,240 


4 


5 


8 



43 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources 
and to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw. Additionally, the Commission acquires and 
manages conservation land for passive recreation and watershed protection purposes. Over 
2,000 acres of land are under the control and custody of the Commission. 

The Conservation Division's projects of note for 2006 included improvements in the 
Town's public lands, streamlining of the permitting process and cooperation with emergency 
services. 

The Commission worked closely with several different private trail and public service 
groups to improve linkages with trail networks and provide well-maintained woodland walkways 
for the Town's citizens. In addition to trail work with AVIS, the Andover Trails Committee, the 
Bay Circuit Network and the Walk-to-School project, the Commission has also provided 
opportunities for Boy Scout Groups to attain Eagle awards for land improvements. A combined 
Eagle Scout project provided a massive clean up of the Merrimack River walkway and the 
addition of picnic tables, birdhouses and other amenities. A cooperative project with the Wood 
Hill School provided an opportunity for the construction of a bridge as a conservation trail 
improvement and class project. 

The Commission increased its conservation land holdings by 51 acres in 2006 primarily 
to provide neighborhood trails, wildlands and public open space for passive recreation. 

Several measures have been enacted to streamline the permitting process. The 
Commission has updated the Town website to include more information and documents. New 
innovative methods of filing management have been enacted to make it easier to file and to 
shorten meeting and accelerate application time-lines. 

The Commission has widened its use of peer reviewers for specific projects. These 
reviews provide for third-party professional scrutiny of a project without any cost to the 
taxpayers. 

The Mother's Day Floods demonstrated in a dramatic fashion the need for the protection 
of the Town's wetlands. It was all too easy to see that projects built in the sensitive flood plains 
and the bufferzones to wetlands suffered the most from flood damage. The Conservation 
Division worked closely with the Department of Public Works, Board of Health, Town residents 
and emergency services to provide support and emergency certification for restoration of 
collapsed roadways, detention ponds and damaged bridges. 

In the coming year, the Commission will host a Conservation Overseers meeting for our 
network of trail volunteers, as well as host an Ecological Summit for the many municipal and 
environmental groups that are interested in assuring that the proposed 1-93 corridor project 



44 



25 


24 


24 


192 


189 


232 


on 2 


6 


4 


65 


32 


29 


8 


9 


4 


30 


12 


25 


56 


81 


71 


— 


7 


10 


42 


32 


40 


37 


28 


19 


11 


15 


11 


9 


8 


8 


6 





51 


$26,709 


$41,170 


$43,305 


— 


$9,200 


$1,500 



provides protection to the Town's river ways and conservation interests. The Commission also 
looks forward to improving the passive recreation interests of the conservation land on the 
former Reichhold site and other Town reservations. 

CONSERVATION DIVISION STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Conservation Commission Meetings 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area Delineation 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Extension Permits 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Ticket Fines Collected 

HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, 
evaluation, budgeting, enforcement, inspection and pseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The 
Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing 
with State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is 
primarily responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public 
Health assumes primary responsibility for coordination among the various boards in permit 
granting and proper land use, specifically in the area of environmental protection issues (i.e. 
septic system design, wetland pollution, water quality protection). The Director designs 
programs and implements policies as proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the 
health needs of the community. The Board of Health consists of three volunteer members 
appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

There have been changes in 2006 in the Health Division worth noting. In January, long 
time Director of Public Health Everett F. Penney, Jr. retired after 26 years of service to the Town 
of Andover. In July, after 39 years of dedication, Dr. Douglas Dunbar sought to end his time on 
the Board of Health, with many years as its chairman, and Dr. Stephen Loring stepped down 



45 



after temporarily filling a seat. The Health Division is in a position to achieve even greater things 
as we adjust to new leadership and new ideas. 

Issues of note from 2006 include: 

Coordinated response to the Mother's Day Flood resulted in safe and effective assistance 

being provided to residents in storm damaged areas. 

The identification of problems in that response have resulted in policy and procedural 

changes to plug those gaps and ensure a better response in the future. 

Guilford Rail dropped its suit against the town and agreed to work to control both noise and 

fume emissions. 

Public Health Week in April included forums on the Fish Brook Initiative and Lyme Disease, 

both well attended and supported. 

Staff has been trained in Incident Command in accordance with federal requirements for all 

first responders to emergencies. 

A measured response was the result of the Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) outbreak in the 

Northeast - no cases of EEE occurred in Andover. 

The Fish Brook Initiative released its long-awaited report, resulting in the formation of a 

standing Fish Brook Watershed Advisory Committee to further that work. 

HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 





2004 


2005 


2006 


Board of Health Meetings 


11 


14 


12 


Plan Reviews 


206 


222 


180 


Restaurant Inspections 


93 


153 


197 


Environmental/Sanitary Code Inspections 


185 


194 


240 


Complaints & Investigations 


309 


277 


202 


Administrative Hearings 


14 


10 


6 


Court Actions 


12 


12 


3 


Total Permits Issued 


— 


— 


2,053 


Fees Collected 


$135,143 


$137,105 


$172,639 


HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 









Outreach Clinics 21 21 21 

Attendance 232 233 245 

Senior Center Clinics 49 51 52 

Attendance 688 568 696 

Office Visits 200 244 284 

Home Visits 34 31 50 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 20 20 27 

Influenza Immunization 1455 1668 1849 

Pneumonia Immunization 48 30 33 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 11 12 9 

Attendance 72 92 69 



46 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS (ConU 



Mantoux Tuberculin testing 1 5 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 1 1 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 90 
Latent T.B. Infection Reports 8 

Other Clinic Programs (Public Health Week, FAST - 
Stroke Prevention Program, LifeLine Screening) 



12 

7 

15 

19 

212 



28 
9 

58 

27 

201 



MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE IMMUNIZATION CLINICS 



Summer Clinics 

Office Clinics and Appointments 



70 



54 
6 



51 
5 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Animal Bites 


32 


25 


35 


Brucellosis 


— 


~ 


1 


Chicken Pox 


7 


11 


14 


Campylobacter 
Cryptosporidiosis 
Dengue Fever 


12 


7 
2 


8 
2 
1 


E.coli 0157.H7 


1 








Ehrlichiosis 


— 


1 





Giardia 


3 


4 


2 


Hepatitis A 
Hepatitis B 
Hepatitis C 
Influenza A 


1 
8 
8 
3 


2 
7 
4 




9 
1 



Lyme Disease 
Meningitis (Bacterial) 
Meningitis (Viral) 
Pertussis 


19 


9 


41 
1 
3 
4 


54 


4 


Salmonella 


7 


5 


4 


Strep Pneumonia 
Group A Strep 
Group B Strep 
Tuberculosis (Active) 
Tuberculosis (Suspect) 
Yersinia Entercolitica 



1 

3 
1 




2 


1 

1 


5 
1 
1 
2 
3 



Suspect Disease Requiring Follow-Up 


31 


10 


22 


HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 







The Healthy Communities Tobacco Program, a State-funded entity, is a collaborative 
made up of Boards of Health from twelve communities which is charged with the responsibility 



47 



of enforcing Andover's bylaws that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. This 
organization is also responsible for enforcing the Statewide ban of smoking in enclosed public 
places (including restaurants and bars) that went into effect in July of 2004. Healthy 
Communities serves as the Andover Board of Health's agent on all tobacco control issues. With 
Andover as the lead agency, the collaborative includes Haverhill, Lynnfield, Newburyport, 
Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North Andover, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham and Topsfield. 

In an effort to curb tobacco sales to youth, Healthy Communities conducts quarterly 
compliance checks to make certain local establishments adhere to laws prohibiting sales of 
tobacco to minors. In calendar year 2006, all establishments passed all four compliance checks. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition is comprised of seven community health 
departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, Methuen, North Reading, Reading 
and Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and community capability to respond 
to public health emergencies. The Town of Andover serves as the fiscal agent for the Coalition. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant 
awarded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Coalition is working closely to 
establish Mutual Aid Agreements to allow better working relationships within the group, and has 
also been working with Holy Family and Lawrence General Hospitals in planning for pandemic 
flu matters. The Coalition has also worked to address regional public health issues, including 
responding to last Summer's EEE scare and influenza awareness and preparedness. 

PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of 
the Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the 
recommendations of the Master Plan. 

During 2006, Andover's affordable housing inventory continued to stay above the 10% 
threshold. Staff worked with the Andover Housing Partnership Committee to ensure that 
existing affordable housing continues to be preserved in an effort to keep Andover above the 
State-required 10% threshold. All of the $50,000 grant awarded to Andover from the Northshore 
HOME Consortium for a first time home buyers down payment assistance program was 
allocated to homeowners at Brookside Estates for persons making less than 60% of the median 
income. The Board of Trustees for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund created a plan for 
funding priorities and drafted a request for proposals in order to allocate approximately $120,000 
in grant money received by Andover from the Northshore HOME Consortium. 

The Planning Division, working with the Design Review Task Force, spent the year 
evaluating Andover's existing design review process and created a list of eight recommendations 
in order to reinstitute a successful and effective design review process in the General Businesses 
and Mixed Use Districts. 



48 



Division staff worked on open space preservation and wrestled with numerous 
subdivision and site plan proposals to achieve the best possible development on the Town's 
diminishing vacant lands. The staff and Planning Board began encouraging Low Impact 
Development techniques for all new development proposals to enhance compatibility with 
existing neighborhoods and mitigate environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. 

The Planning Division continued its efforts toward downtown improvements and work 
on major transportation system projects. Working with Design Consultants, Inc., the 100% 
design plans for the Main Street Improvement Project were submitted to the Massachusetts 
Highway Department and are awaiting an award to a contractor. Construction is anticipated to 
begin in the Summer of 2007. 

In 2006, the Planning Division played a pivotal role in helping to facilitate the 
Junction/Route 93 Development Area which represents one of the largest concentrations of 
employment in Northeastern Massachusetts. The development area is situated between Exit 41 
(Route 125) and Exit 42 (Dascomb Road). Achieving a Lowell Junction Interchange has the 
potential of opening up hundreds of acres of currently landlocked and grossly underutilized 
industrial land as well as allowing for expansion of existing industries in the area that are 
constrained by poor access to the interstate. Recognizing the potential economic development 
benefits that may result from a new interchange in this area, Andover, Tewksbury and 
Wilmington (Tri-Town Task Force) have agreed to pursue the approval, design and construction 
of a new full-service interchange at The Junction Development Area, between Exits 41 & 42. 

In October, the Tri-Town Task Force obtained the professional services from the Cecil 
Group to assist the three communities in developing a Unified Development Vision that would 
be consistent with the States "Sustainable Development" principles. By working together the 
three communities hope to develop a vision that would result in more efficient land utilization 
than existing zoning, increase tax revenues, expand their economic base, while respecting 
existing natural habitat areas. 

PLANNING DIVISION STATISTICS 





2004 


2005 


2006 


Planning Board Meetings 


27 


21 


20 


Public Hearings Held 


141 


105 


108 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


9 


4 


6 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


4 


1 


1 


ANR Plans 


33 


27 


28 


Site Plan Reviews 


7 


7 


5 


Special Permits Issued 


23 


6 


17 


Lot Releases and Clearance Certificates 


44 


27 


28 


Warrant Articles Reported 


14 


18 


13 


Street Acceptances 


4 


6 


1 


Subdivision Guarantees 


$405,412 


$278,275 


$288,820 


Revenues Generated 


$71,368 


$31,728 


$28,127 



49 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial 
Hall at the Memorial Library, Elm Square. The Board of Selectmen appoints five regular 
members and four associate members. The public hearings by the Board are the result of 
applications in the following areas: 

A Variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A Special Permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 

Administrative official; 

A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town of 

Andover (Comprehensive Permit, M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town 
Clerk and recorded at the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the appeal period. 

ZONING DIVISION STATISTICS 



2004 


2005 


2006 


Hearings Held* 25 


14 


14 


Deliberation Meetings Held** 22 


12 


7 


Petitions Filed*** 98 


119 


73**** 


Petitions Granted 103 


107 


55 


Petitions Denied 5 


16 


13 


Petitions Withdrawn, Dismissed, Continued 18 


5 


7 



Fees Collected 536,182 $41,435 $26,445 



* These meetings often include both public hearings and deliberations. 

** Deliberations are often held immediately after a public hearing and, therefore, a Saturday 

deliberation meeting is not needed if no site views or deliberations are pending or 

continued to a later date. 

Some petitions contain multiple requests, pay only one fee and are counted once. 

73 petitions were filed and heard in 2006 - 1 was filed in 2006 and will be heard in 2007. 

Nine cases were filed in 2005 but heard/deliberated in 2006. Three cases were 

filed/opened in 2006 but continued to 2007. 



50 



*** 
**** 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



948 



950 

900 

850 

800 

750 -; 

700 

650 j 

600 

550 

500 



905 

-875 r-i 880 



,827 



699 



749 
715 719 n 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 




e& 



V 



& 



cr 
V 






s # <$ 



& 






& 



cv 3 



BUILDING PERMITS 



1*487 




sr ; 



^ 



rsN 



^ V 



V 



& 






& 



V 






V 



PERMIT FEE REVENUE R 



$1,800,000 

$1,700,000 

$1,600,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,400,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,200,000 

$1,100,000 

$1,000,000 

$900,000 

$800,000 

$700,000 

$600,000 

$500,000 

$400,000 

$300,000 

$200,000 



N* 



A 









ro 



in 



o> 



in 
ro 

— o — -w- 

10 i— i 

00~ 

Ln 



ro" ■"*■" 






00 
LD- 

■faO- 



o 

00 



-O- 
l£> 
OV 

-VO- 

00 

-fM- 



s* 



-F ^ 



"P 5 T>> q? 'V 'V 



51 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




^ ^ -S^ ^ ^ r^ rS 

1? 1? 17 17 17 17 17 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



60 



50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



I I I I n I S ii I 

Z 6 9 - K ~ 1 " 



2£ 



3E 



- 15 _ 



26 25 



17 



22 



33 



27 2£ 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



DANR Plans 

■ Definitive Subdivision 



DSite Plan Reviews 

D Preliminary Subdivision 



VACCINE DISTRIBUTION 



20, 
19, 
18, 

M> 

16, 
15, 
14, 
13, 
12, 
11 

% 

8 

7 

i 

4 
3; 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
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14,406 
13,474 ,_, 

n 12,122 



8,234 



6,890 n 
5,979 _ 




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c^ c^" c^ c^ <# C^ c? 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

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<& cx^ (# c?> S c^ c^ 5 <# c^ c? 
VV'V171717'V'V r V > 



52 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide a responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
sendees to all Town and School buildings (over 1.3 million sq. ft), parks and grounds, cemetery, 
forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four Superintendents, an 
Administrative Assistant, Construction Project Manager, Work Control Center Coordinator, two 
part-time Accounts Payable Clerks, Budget/Contracts Analyst, Facilities Services Supervisor and 
a diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled maintenance trades persons, vehicle mechanics, 
custodians, and grounds and tree workers. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS / HIGHLIGHTS 

The Town was awarded "Tree City USA" from the National Arbor Day Foundation for the 

seventh consecutive year. 

The Plant & Facilities Department coordinated two State-wide (one day) municipal energy 

forums that brought over 125 municipal officials to Andover at each forum in April & 

November. 

The Department received the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection 

S.T.A.R.L Award for the work done in removing lead from the Andover Public Schools 

drinking water. 

P&F applied for and was awarded a $15,000 Tree Planting Grant from The NGRJD ACT 

program. 

New Town-wide networked access control & CCTV security system installed in multiple 

School buildings & in process in two Town buildings. 

Coordinated with the Friends of Football on the construction of a new donated 1754 square 



53 



foot Golden Warriors building at the High School's Lovely Field - completed in November. 

Cleared State and local legal hurtles & coordinated approvals with Town & School 

Departments. 

Over $2.5 million of capital improvement projects implemented in School & Town buildings 

and field projects. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings, which total in excess of 1.3 
million square feet. The two superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of 
Town/School capital improvement projects. Additionally, they provide mail delivery to all 
buildings, maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street light poles. 

2004 2005 2006 

School Labor Hours 19,345 22,251 20,202 

School - Total Labor & Material Cost $887,077 $1,093,861 $982,103 

Town Labor Hours 5,939 7,470 6,010 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs $415,476 $427,569 $407,906 

Capital Projects: School: $2,154,298 Town: $432,783 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

BANCROFT SCHOOL 

Partial Roof Replacement 

Painted Exterior of Modulars 

Painted and New Lighting Installed in Kl & K2 

Replaced Air Compressor and Air Dryer 

Driveway Widening Project & Circle Modifications and Barriers 

Installed New Walkway around Modular's 

Repair & Replaced Some Exterior Doors 

Replaced Section of Sprinkler Main 

Chimney Cap Installed 

Modifications to Modular Roof Scuppers Completed 

DOHERTY SCHOOL 

Updated Teachers Room Kitchen with Counters & Cabinets 

Asbestos Floor Tile Remediation - Atrium Near HP Ramp & Cafe Area 

Auditorium Repairs - Ceiling Tiles Hazard Removed 

Exterior Stairs & Other Asphalt Walkway Repairs 

Facilitated Room 1 16 for Cooking Class Stoves 

Removed & Replaced Carpet With New Tile in Room 136 

Replaced Central Air Compressor and Air Dryer 



54 



Interior Painting Completed at Multiple Locations 

Repaired Washouts Rear Parking Lot & Added Curbing and Stops 

Installed new Exterior Main Entrance Lights 

HIGH PLAIN/WOOD HILL SCHOOLS 
Repair Boiler Outlet Leaks at Two Boilers 
Repaired leak in hot water heater/tank 
Repainted Ten Classrooms & Some Hallway Area 
Move Dumpster Location (new concrete pad installed) 
Sidewalk Masonry Repairs 

Installed Chains to Bollards to Prevent Vehicles From Entering Play Area 
Site Repairs to Rear Roadway, HC Field Entrance & Basketball Court Washouts 
Site Repairs Catch Basins & Access Road 
Security Card Access Units added to Two Doors 
Warranty Roof Repairs Completed 
Entrance Canopies Roof Modifications 

HIGH SCHOOL/COLLINS CENTER 
Built Dividing Wall in Career Center 
Restroom Renovations Four Bathrooms Third Floor 
Dunn Gym Floor totally Refinished & Repainted Walls 

New Security System Camera's and Access Control System Entire School (67 cameras & 1 1 
access units) 

Lovely Field - New Building Completed, Including Additional Renovations to Golden 
Warriors Building (coordinated efforts with private group) 
Extensive Roof Repairs Completed 

Kitchen Improvements - Lighting, Painting, Door Glazing, Piping for New Gas Appliances, 
Vending Machine Relocation, Ventilate Deli Area and New Fire Suppression System 
Replaced Field House PA System's Amplifier and Jacks 
Installed Temperature Alarms on Walk-in Freezer and Cooler 
Installed AC Unit for Room 138 Unit Ventilator 
Installed Unit Ventilator and Exhaust Duct in Room 377-01 
Wired New Sound System in Dunn Gym. 
Rear Collins Center Road Drainage Problem Corrected 
Sewer Manhole Repaired by Tennis Courts 

Removed Deteriorating Bollards and Repaired Concrete at Main Entrance 
Waterproofed Elevator Pit 

Repainted Seven Classrooms, Cafeteria, Kitchen & Hallways 
Repaired Collins Center Exterior Stairs 

SANBORN ELEMENTERY SCHOOL 

Repainted Exterior Modular' s & Some Interior School Areas 
New Cafe Window Treatment Installed 
Extensive Roof Repairs Completed 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Human Resources Renovations to New Third Floor Offices & Move Completed 

55 



Carpet Replacement Third Floor Corridor, Pupil Personnel & Technology 

Painting - Pupil Personnel, Human Resources & Hallway 

Upgraded Old Human Resources Space for Assistant Superintendent Offices 

Installed Elevator Power Loss Return Controls 

Upgraded AC for IT Computer Server Room 

Provided Additional Power to IT Computer Server Room. 

SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 

Carpet Replacement Project (with vinyl tile) Eight Third Floor Classrooms 

Ongoing Window Replacements - Four arch windows installed 

Painting - Eight Classrooms & Bathrooms 

Bathroom Partitions Lower Level Bathrooms 

Replaced LL Boys Bathroom Linoleum 

Replaced Bathroom Fixtures/Sinks 

New Main Air Handler Steam Mixing Valve Installed and Variable Frequency Drive 

Replaced All Toilet Seats 

Installed New Fence on Rear Low Roof 

Major Roof Repairs Completed - Over 200 Slates Replaced & Temporary Repairs to Cupola 

SOUTH ELEMENTERY 

New Carpet Installed Band Room and Adjacent Offices 

Completed Conversion to New DDC Energy Mgt. System - Substantial Energy Savings 

Extensive Interior Painting - Classrooms, Cafe, Kitchen, etc. 

New Storage Container for Snow Blowers Purchased & In Place 

Major Roof Repairs Completed 

WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Partial Roof Replacement Completed (Fifth grade area) 

New Security System - Camera's & Access Control System - Complete & online (all in- 

house labor) 

Installed Ceiling Fans in Cafe 

Installed a Skinned Infield at the 60° Baseball Diamond 

Roof Problem Old Chimney - Removed Old Chimney & Capped Off and Replaced Wall 

Replaced Main Water Line from Street 

Connected All Night Lights to Security System for Energy Savings 

Re-piped Boiler Room Oil Piping 

Replaced Damaged Steam Pipe Insulation in Boiler Room 

Defective Classroom Door Locks Replaced (67 in total) - No Cost to Town 

Exterior Masonry Repairs Completed 

Replaced Front Entrance Curtain Wall (Doors, Windows Etc.) 

Re-piped Boiler Room Oil Supply Piping 

Constructed Adult Handicap Bathroom in Front of A-Pod Area 

WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Asbestos Remediation (tile in corridor to media center) 

Partial Roof Replacement Completed - Corridor to Media Center 

Replaced Boiler Sections on Boiler #2 

56 



Added Custodial Slop Sinks 

Restored Fume Hood 

Refmished Gym Floor 

Added Security Hardware Boys Locker Room Door 

Added Access Control Reader Rear Door to Playground 

PA System Added to Gym, Auditorium & Cafe 

Replaced Boiler Room Exterior Door with Roll-Up Door 

Installed New Girls Locker Room Changing Stalls 

Installed New Toilet Partitions Girls Locker Room 

Interior Painting Completed Six Rooms 

Installed Ceiling Fans Cafeteria 

Repairs to Glass Block Gym Wall Interior & Exterior 

Installed All New Classroom Lock Sets 

New Pilot Study Perimeter Security System on Line 

ALL SCHOOLS 

Playground Inspections & Repairs - Inspection Completed - 80% of Planned Repairs 

Completed 

Parking Lot Striping, Planned Locations Complete 

Summer Work Orders Completed 

Asbestos AHERA Inspection 

Building Sprinkler Systems Inspections 

Landscape -Tree & Shrub Pruning 

Roof Access Safety Ladder Replacement/Repairs Completed - Bancroft School (1), Doherty 

Middle School (3), Andover High School (1), West Elementary School (1), Red Spring 

Road(l) 

Installed Cover Plates Old Fire Alarm Master Boxes 

BALLARDVALE FIRE STATION 
Heating System Upgrades 
Re-Pointed/Rebuilt Chimney 

CEMETERY BUILDINGS 

New Roofs on both Buildings 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Emergency Roof Repairs to Slate Roof Completed 

Parking Area Wall Repair (section replaced) 

Wired Children's Room Computer Stations for Security System 

Relocated Emergency Generator Exhaust Stack 

New Security System Access Control/CCTV System in Process 

SENIOR CENTER RENOVATIONS/PATIO 

Wood Floor & Patio - Bid Awarded (Patio subject to ATM Funding) 
New Casework Shelf Units Installed 



57 



TOWN OFFICES 

Painting Second Floor Offices (Town Clerk & Assessors) 

Painting Third Floor Office 

Painted Main Stairwells 

Security Access Control System Installed 

Installed New HVAC/Humidity Control System for the Town Vault 

Constructed New Office for Assistant Treasurer 

New Carpeting Installed Treasurer's, Town Clerk's & Assessor's Offices 

Installed Elevator Power Loss Return Controls 

Installed Lighting for WWII Memorial 

Upgraded Circulating Pump Controls to Variable Frequency Drives 

Installed new lighting in DCS storeroom 

Added Exterior Lights to the Energy Management System 



TRAFFIC LIGHTS & ANTIQUE STREET LIGHTS 
Replaced Shawsheen Plaza Cabinet & Controls 
Painted Antique Street Light Poles 

WEST FIRE STATION 

Floor Tile Asbestos Remediation 
Installed New Replacement Windows 
New Roof Installed 
Design for New Heating System Completed 



TOWN YARD/TOWNWIDE 

Buxton Court Land Transfer - Complete 

New Heating System Water/Sewer Division 

New Ceiling/Lighting Water Division Offices 

New Windows Forestry & Water Building 

New Perimeter Drain Forestry/Water Building - Complete (by DPW) 

Roof Top Units Red Spring Road 

Two Used 20' Storage Units Installed - Red Spring Road 

Wood Park Study - Design Awarded 

Parking Lot Striping Some Areas 

Paving Red Spring Road Driveway 

Eagle Scout Playground HC Access Project Penguin Park 

Bathroom Repairs/Upgrades Rec. Park 

Install Shrubs Andover Village Parking Lot 

New Parking Lot Fence Installed 

Bald Hill Security Improvements - Jersey Barriers Installed (65 Jersey Barriers Obtained 

Free From Big Dig Project) 

Installed Concrete Base for Vietnam Memorial 



TOWN HOUSE 

Refinished Wood Auditorium Floor 

New Energy Mgt. Work Station Installed 

Exterior Windows- Repainting/Re-glazing First Floor 



58 



PARKS AND GROUNDS, CEMETERY & FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, snow removal, and moving 
heavy items such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area and building and 
repairing park benches and tables. 

Schools Town 



Man Hours 


8,915 


19,551 


Labor & Materials 


$329,645 


$582,085 


Capital Projects 


$5,318 


$6,155 


PARKS DIVISION 







The Parks Division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1.4 million 
square feet of lawn areas. Ball fields and lawns are located on all School and Town building sites 
and other Town property including Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower 
Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, Town-owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, 
triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) 
for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, 
watering, over-seeding, liming fertilizing and weed and insect control. This division also 
maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow 
removal at all Town buildings. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Total reconstruction of two 60 foot baseball diamonds, one at the back field of West 

Elementary and the other at Doherty School, both were converted from grass infields to 

complete diamond mix infields. 

Aerated and Seeded Wood Hill and High Plain Athletic fields three times during the growing 

season. Added 75 yards of screened loam to low spots and goal mouth areas. 

Aerated and seeded all three fields at South School twice during the season. 

Spread 20 yards of loam on Doherty football field to smooth out rough and low areas. 

Aerated and seeded Upper and Lower Shawsheen fields three times during the season. 

Removed 4,000 square feet of turf from Upper Shawsheen loamed, leveled and re-sodded the 

area that had been destroyed due to overuse from athletic teams. 

Re-graded and leveled infield playing area of Rec Park baseball diamond. 

Laser graded infield at Doherty 90 ft. diamond. 

Removed old unsafe swing set at West Elementary School. 

Removed old unsafe playground equipment at Iceland Park. 



59 



CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 2006, there were 57 full 
burials, 22 cremations and 49 gravesites sold for total revenue of $70,475. Cemetery operations 
and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small 
trees, leaf pickup, Town-wide snow removal and other tasks including grounds maintenance in 
Recreation Park and special projects at other Town facilities. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued pruning of low hanging limbs throughout the year and also removed 5 badly 

decayed trees along Cemetery roads. 

Spread 300 cubic yards of safety mulch at playgrounds throughout the Town. 

Assisted PTO groups with landscape improvements and construction of renovated 

playgrounds. 

Started preliminary site work for continued expansion of Cemetery. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. The 
majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of 
undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved 
visibility. The Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town and 
maintains the Bald Hill compost site. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Received Tree City U.S.A. designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation for the 

seventh consecutive year. 

Responded to 105 requests for tree work by Town residents. 

Planted nineteen 2.5- 3.0 inch caliper shade trees along Town streets. 

Responded to nine emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department. 

Continued monitoring & providing support to the composting operation at Bald Hill (this site 

requires a full day each week for one man and a laborer to manage the leaves and grass 

clippings. Grinding and screening of leaves produced 3700 cubic yards of compost. 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday lighting on Main Street. 

Celebrated Arbor Day on April 26, 2006 at Red Spring Road Maintenance building. Lilac 

and Kousa Dogwood trees were planted at the site in memory of two longtime Town 

employees. 

Ground 800 cubic yards of brush and stumps at the landfill with outside contractor. 

Forestry staff attended seminars hosted by New England Growers, Massachusetts Tree 

Warden's Association and Lesco Inc. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent who also is 

60 



responsible for purchasing and material's management for all Plant and Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant and 
Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles and coordinates the purchasing for all new Town vehicles. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 155 Town vehicles and major pieces 

of equipment, 1 8 School and Town buildings emergency generators and 42 smaller pieces of 

equipment. Completed 1,097 work orders totaling 4688 man hours and $334,902 labor & 

material. 

Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 

Supported snow removal operations, maintaining equipment and installation and removal of 

DPW sander units. 

Maintained and repaired all fire apparatus as well as assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the ladder trucks hydraulic and pump systems. 

Annual Fuel Consumption in gallons for all Town departments is as follows: 

2004 2005 2006 

Gasoline 
Diesel 
Total Gallons 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION - FACILITIES SERVICES 

A Facilities Services Supervisor and part-time clerk manage the Municipal Facilities 
Division of Plant & Facilities. This division manages the Andover Town House (Old Town Hall) 
as well as all Town and School field schedules and rentals, School building schedules, and 
rentals and park rentals. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Hosted two Municipal Energy Forums at the Andover Town House. The forums provided 

valuable information to Towns and Schools officials on how to save energy as well as saving 

money on utility costs. 

Implemented new calendar software to streamline the daily scheduling activities, replacing 

the old hand-written calendars. 

Implemented new version of accounting software, which produces permits replacing the old 

hand-written permits, and provides improved tracking capabilities. 

Continue to support the energy management program at all School buildings by consolidating 

the use of buildings in the evening, and closing schools on the weekends. This program has 

provided a large energy cost savings for the School Department. 

Continue to coordinate meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and town officials to 



61 



89,307 


86,684 


84,849 


40,425 


44,574 


37,895 


129,732 


131,258 


122,744 



support field maintenance, scheduled programs, and special projects. 

RENTAL ACTIVITY 

In 2006, the rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the 
accounting system. For every rental request received, a permit is issued and an invoice is 
generated. 

SCHOOLS 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town. Growth was seen in Community 
Service Division and School enrichment program uses. There was a slight decline in school 
rental permits as a result of implementing the energy conservation program. Five schools were 
available for gym rentals only after 6:00PM, and four schools housed mostly Town and School 
programs. Weekend use of schools is not permitted from the end of November until after April 
vacation. 

FIELDS 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 2006. The High School, Department 
of Community Services, and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is not field space available for programs to grow and/or expand. 

RECREATION PARK 

Recreation Park is available for private rentals and is also used by the schools, 
Department of Community Services, and youth leagues. 

OLD TOWN HALL 

The function hall at Old Town Hall is available for rental seven days a week. The 
Department of Community Services is the most frequent weekday user, and they also use the hall 
for various evening dances. Andover Youth Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and 
other events at the Town House. The Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the 
Town House each year. Permits issued by the Municipal Buildings Division are as follows: 

2004 2005 2006 

Schools 

Town Buildings 

Fields 

Total Permits Issued 1,093 818 712 

* The method for tracking permits changed in 2005 - the 581 permits listed does not represent a 
decrease in activity (one permit per group vs. one permit per event). 

62 



871 


581* 


485 


99 


103 


95 


123 


134 


132 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



160 
140 
120 
100 

80 

60 

40 

20 ■- 
- 



TOWN BUILDING 

RENTAL PERMITS 

(Includes Town Hall & Sr. Ctr.) 



59 



99 



100 



79 



95 



2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



1,000 
900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 




SCHOOL BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 



318 



871 



615 



581 



485 



2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



J 



160 
140 
120 
100 

80 

60 

40 \ 

20 




FIELD RENTAL PERMITS 
(Includes Rec Park) 

134 



76 



115 



123 



132 



2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



120 
110 
100 \ 

90 

80 

70 

60 \ 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 




SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



66 



81 



53 



56 



2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 



63 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and 
bids, performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: new 
sidewalk construction on Chestnut Street, Whittier Street and a portion of North Main Street; and 
drainage improvements on Chestnut Street, Whittier Street, Lowell Street, Alden Road and 
several other locations. The Division also performed field survey and preliminary design to 
prepare for upcoming reconstruction of sanitary sewers on Balmoral Street, York Street, 
Carisbrook Street, Argyle Street and Arundel Street. 

The Engineering staff assisted and coordinated with consultants, contractors and residents 
during the design and construction of the sewer extensions for the Contracts No. 4 of the South 
Main Street/Ballardvale Road areas. Various duties performed included utility markouts, 
inspections and resolving complaints. Staff members also worked closely with the consultant and 
contractor on the design and construction of the repairs to the Essex Street Bridge and the new 
traffic signals on Lowell Street at the Raytheon entrance. 

Staff provided assistance and support to the Highway and Sewer Divisions, Police 
Department and residents during the severe floods in May. 

Implementation activities to comply with new EPA Phase II Stormwater Management 
regulations were performed. A total of 139 storm drain outlets were field located and inspected 
in Moderate-High priority sub-watershed areas such as the Wobum Street, Ballardvale Road, 
South Main Street and Tewksbury Street watershed areas. Data was also added to the GIS 
system to create a Town-wide drainage map as part of the requirements. Activity reports from 
various Town departments working on the program were documented and then utilized by the 
Town's consultant in preparation and submission of the annual Stormwater Management report 
to EPA in April. Staff also worked with the consultant and Planning, Health, Building and 
Conservation staff to develop the proposed Stormwater Management Bylaw. 

Work was performed to coordinate the development of the Town's GIS system with the 
consultant; install software, review final data, checkplots and database design, continue 
development of drainage, water and sewer utility layers and updating of the parcel maps for the 
Town Assessor and printed the necessary copies for other Town departments. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of 10 Town streets was prepared with 
assistance given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on these streets. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board and checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of 



64 



proposed roads and utilities. Road and utility construction in new subdivisions and site 
developments such as Harwich Lane, Shandel Circle, Woodman Ridge, Barnard Street, Melmark 
School, Andover Country Club and numerous other sites were inspected and tested to insure 
compliance with Town construction standards. Performance Bond amounts were calculated as 
requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Bay State Gas Company, Verizon, Mass Electric, Comcast and other private contractors were 
issued and the necessary utility markouts and inspections were performed. 

The Engineering Division provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 

Streets Resurfaced (miles) 

Street Opening Permit Issued & Inspected 

Sewer Connections Reviewed for Board of Health 

Assessor Maps Updated 

Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (plans/lots) 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 

Drainage outfalls located, mapped & inspected 

Subdivision Construction Inspection/Tests: 

Water Mains (ft.) 

Sewer Mains (ft.) 

Drain Lines (ft.) 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the fall, spring and summer 
months, two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning winter sand off all streets and 
cleaning road construction areas. A few days per week the sweepers start work at 5 a.m. to take 
advantage of low traffic and parking conditions especially in business areas. The Highway 
Division is responsible for the maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. The Division 
also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to acceptance as public ways. 
The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all storm water culverts and 
drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as maintenance of water 
courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. The Highway Division is the lead agency 
responsible for snow and ice removal and flood control measures; other Town divisions assist in 
these operations. 



65 



427 


595 


746 


34,790 


21,976 


1,124 


1,325 


1,220 


16,619 


4.8 


4.5 


4.1 


298 


203 


209 


160 


242 


170 


51 


59 


55 


21/46 


12/58 


17/40 


6 


12 


14 


298 


97 


139 


8,133 


13,249 


8,080 


1,754 


7,829 


5,904 


3,002 


3,234 


2,862 



HIGHWAY DIVISION STATISTICS 



2004 2005 2006 



12 


12 




4.8 


4.8 


4 


2,434 


8,000 


4,000 


1,350 


1,134 


1,303 


230 


212 


189 


53 


106 


90 


6 


10 


12 


14 


13 


5 


43 


63 


41 


326 


319 


308 


8 


12 


9 



Number of streets resurfaced 

Total number of miles of road resurfaced 

Total number of feet of curbs constructed 

Catch basins cleaned 

Storm drains/culverts cleaned 

Catch basins repaired 

Storm drains repaired 

Snowstorms 

Sanding events 

Signs repaired/installed 

Masonry wall repairs 

SEWER DIVISION 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood Street, Shawsheen Village, 
and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 93 miles of sanitary 
sewers along with eight (8) new pumping stations and 5,850 connections with an additional 24 
miles of mainline sewer and 1600 connections scheduled to come on line over the next three (3) 
years. The raw sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by 
means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's 
Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for treatment. 

SEWER DIVISION STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 

Sewer Mains Rodded - Regular Maintenance 

Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 

SOLID WASTE/RECYCLING 

Andover has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant, 
Wheelabrator, located in North Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, #1 thru #7 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
$30/ton. We earned a total credit of $50,890 last year. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass 
clippings compost site on the High Plain Road, near Bald Hill. The Town screens and grinds the 
material annually with the compost being available to Town residents. 



37 


35 


27 


108 


60 


73 


5 


2 


5 



66 



SOLID WASTE/RECYCLING STATISTICS 



2004 



2005 



2006 



Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of mixed residential paper 

Tons of corrugated containers 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of #1 thru #7 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 



3,452 


12,786 


11,932 


2,596 


2,563 


2,966 


399 


356 


297 


593 


645 


728 


35 


38 


43 


35 


38 


43 


35 


38 


43 


6,200 


7,000 


6,800 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2006, the Water Treatment Plant processed more than 2.2 billion gallons of water 
- a daily average of 6.2 million gallons - to produce over 2.0 billion gallons of finish water 
delivered to the distribution system. To augment available water supplies, 1.04 billion gallons 
were diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump station. 
The Fish Brook station was online for a total of 148 days over the course of the year. The chart 
below illustrates the breakdown of total water consumption. 



2006 Water Consumption 



Lawn/Irrigation 
10% 



Municipal 
2% 



Commercial 
26% 




Residential 
47% 



Ind/Ag 
15% 



I Residential ■ Ind/Ag D Commercial ■Lawn/Irrigation D Municipal 



67 



Weekly, monthly and quarterly sampling was completed, as well as QA/QC testing 
required to maintain full certification of the Laboratory for the analysis of potable and non- 
potable water. More than 430 samples were processed by the laboratory for neighboring towns, 
over two dozen resident-requested samples were analyzed and more than one hundred 
stormwater samples were processed. During the four compliance periods of 2006, volatile 
organic compounds, secondary contaminants, disinfection byproducts and perchlorate levels 
were monitored in the finished water. Annual testing for bromate, nitrate and nitrite in the 
finished water and Abbott Well was completed, and supplementary testing of the raw and 
finished water for synthetic organic compounds was also done. All results were found to be in 
compliance with EPA/MADEP standards and regulations. Weekly monitoring for coliform 
bacteria was conducted at the plant, throughout the distribution system and at Abbott Well; there 
were no violations of the Total Coliform Rule for 2006 and regular monitoring for Giardia, 
Cryptosporidium and enteric viruses suggests 99.9% removal of these organisms during the 
treatment process. 

Routine and preventative maintenance was performed, including a rebuild of the raw 
water pump assemble as per the 4-year plan, replacement of the chlorine pump at the Fish Brook 
pump station and renovation of the alum feed system at the WTP. Online pretreatment 
monitoring systems were installed in all basins, real-time quality control monitoring was 
installed at the Prospect Hill storage area, SCADA control room capabilities were extended into 
critical areas of the WTP and video surveillance systems were expanded with new installation of 
cameras by WTP operators. 

WTP staff was trained and certified in basic first aid, CPR and AED use and Right to 
Know training over the course of the year. All operators maintained current licensing, including 
five operators holding 4C licenses, three holding 4T licenses and two holding 3D licenses. A 
comprehensive safety walk-through was completed to assess and upgrade existing safety 
measures as appropriate. The Emergency Response Plan was updated to include schematics and 
maps of pertinent locations throughout the distribution system. 

WTP staff along with Plant and Facilities staff was awarded the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection STAR-L award in recognition of lead abatement efforts 
in drinking water sources in Andover Public Schools. WTP staff also held a seat on the New 
England Water Works Association (NEWWA) Disinfection Committee, as well as contributed to 
classes offered by NEWWA/MWWA on various pertinent topics. WTP staff also collaborated 
with the Greenscapes North Shore Initiative to bring the Greenscapes Program to Andover in 
fulfillment of Water Management Act and Stormwater Management requirements. 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT STATISTICS 

2004 2005 2006 

Hydrants Repaired 
Hydrants Replaced 
Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 
Hydrants Flushed 



68 



121 


137 


163 


72 


27 


23 


286 


231 


257 


178 


152 


193 



2004 2005 2006 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 

House Service Leaks Repaired 

House Services Renewed 

New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 

Old Water Meters Replaced 

Water Meters Bench Checked 

Water Shut Offs/Tum Ons 

60 Gate Boxes Adjusted 

Gallons of Water Treated (in millions) 

Average Daily Gallons Pumped 

(in million gallons) 6.03 6.72 6.2 

Maximum Day (in million gallons) 10.772 14.296 12.038 



251 


15 


17 


14 


7 


14 


53 


28 


22 


145 


105 


76 


166 


130 


213 


15 


23 


12 


126 


106 


115 


63 


60 


65 


2,199 


2,458 


2,264 



69 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 




/ S #####V#V 






SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 



18,000 

16,000 

14,000 

§ 12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 



-h n <r 
n (m f— , 

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II 



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WATER TREATED 



VI 

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3,000 

2,800 

2,600 

2,400 

2,200 f 

2,000 

1,800 

1,600 

1,400 

1,200 

1,000 



2452 



2102 



23772338 
n n 21672200 



2458 



2264 



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70 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



Offering year-round recreational, enrichment, and cultural programs for residents of all ages, 
DCS embraces diversity and accessibility for all while striving to rate the pulse of the community 
and transform ideas into valued programs. A full-time office staff of four, hundreds of part-time 
adult and student employees, vendors and volunteers provide over 500 programs, events and trips 
while servicing over 20,000 residents annually. 

In addition to traditional recreational programs of leagues, fitness programs and children's 
activities, DCS also sponsors special Town-wide events, a concert series, online courses and themed 
dances held at the Old Town Hall. The Division partners with countless Town organizations in 
encouraging healthy lifestyles for all ages. The latest Division improvement is the new Program 
Booklet format that is easier to read and contains more concise information. The booklet is a major 
marketing piece mailed to all Town residents each January, May and September. 



DCS PROGRAM STATISTICS: 



FALL PARTICIPATION 



Fall Classes Youth ages 2 - 1 8 1,557 

Adults 400 

Holly Balls 388 

Special Events/Trips 558 

Kickin' Kids Soccer League 107 

Total Fall Participation 3,010 

WINTER PARTICIPATION 

Winter Classes: Youth ages 2 - 1 8 1,602 

Adults 661 

Bradford Ski grades 3 - 8 189 

Kid's Basketball League grades 1-3 203 

Father/Daughter, Family & Ballroom Dances 184 

Special Events/Trips 295 

Total Winter Participation 3,040 



71 



SUMMER PARTICIPATION 

Summer Classes: Youth ages 2 -18 1,779 

Adults 168 

Special School-Age Children's Programs: 

All-Day Discovery grades K- 5 1,638 

Summer Theatre grades 2 -10 187 

Drop-in Playground grades K-5 8,840 

Drop-in Field Trips grades K-5 280 

Special Pre-School Age Children's Programs: 

Half Pints ages 4-6 3,185 

Park Events ages 1-6 450 

Pomps Pond: 

Stickers 420 

Daily Attendance 50+/cars 

Average number of people per day 200/day 

Concerts: 

The Park/Fourth of July Festivities - all ages 1 1,680 

Special Events: 

Fourth of July all ages 7,500 

Trips & Events all ages 525 

Co-Ed Adult Softball League adults 600 

Total Summer Participation 37,252 

TOTAL YEAR-LONG PARTICIPATION 43,302+ 



72 



DCS STATISTICS 



RECREATION SERVICES REVOLVING 
FUND REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
D,000 
3,000 
$50,000 
$0 



$150, 
$100, 



a q 



*Dt 



3 



N* 



N* 



csV _cv> 



& 



V nr 'V T> °F T> v 



D Revenues 



D Expenditures 



12,000 
11,000 
10,000 
9,000 
8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 



SUMMER PLAYGROUND 
ATTENDANCE 



11,49 5 




«# 



-v° -^ 



cs 



cO' .cv> 



rfe 



-^ nr V v v 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$240,000 

$220,000 

$200,000 

$180,000 

$160,000 

$140,000 

$120,000 

$100,000 

$80,000 

$60,000 

$40,000 

$20,000 

$0 



it\ — 



J1 = 
[*1 = 



1*1° 

IT C 






= tfl 



a 



1998 



2000 



2002 



2004 



2006 



D Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



JULY 4TH & SUMMER 

CONCERT ATTENDANCE 

(2006 includes fireworks & breakfast) 



15,000 

14,000 

13,000 

12,000 

11,000 

10,000 

9,000 

8,000 

7,000 

6,000 

5,000 

4,000 



cO' _cC> 



o 

00 




& 



^■^■'V'V'V'V'V'V'V 



73 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 



THE CHALLENGE 

As the number of Andover residents presently or soon to be 60+ steadily increases, we 
face the challenge of identifying resources for an increasingly diverse elder population. How 
prepared are we to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 60 to 100+? 
What resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in the 
community? Will we, as a community, be ready as more residents seek assistance, either for 
themselves or for family members? The division will continue to create and provide specialized 
programs and services in fulfillment of its mission, as laid out by the Council on Aging, 
following the charge of the Town Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 

the community; 

Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 

community; and 

Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 

this Article (35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health and nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and to combat 
isolation. We continue to develop creative Intergenerational programs serving both seniors and 
young people from pre-school to college age. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition 
programs provides a variety of opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve health. 
Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, educational and recreational 
programs, intergenerational and volunteer opportunities. 

CONSTRAINTS 

Decreased funding compounds the increased need for services. As we struggle to 
maintain core services with fewer resources, we have increased efforts to offset related costs. 
Advocacy at the state and federal levels, grant writing and outside fundraising become 
increasingly important. We are especially grateful to the newly incorporated 'The Friends of the 
Andover Senior Center' for their support. Fees for service cover most program costs and are 
supplemented by coordinating programs with other agencies. We have recently partnered with 
the Andover/North Andover YMCA in an effort to provide access to a variety of programs that 
would otherwise be limited by space constraints. Offsite programming creates additional 



74 



challenges. Seniors interested in participating in programs scheduled off-site often limit their 
participation to one event a day so they won't have to travel between the Senior Center and 
another site. Others are unable to participate in events not scheduled at the Senior Center 
because accessibility to off-site locations is limited by the lack of affordable and accessible 
transportation services. 

INCREASED NEED 

Requests for services tend to increase in difficult economic times. Direct services, 
including Medical Transportation, Friendly Visitors, Senior Connections and particularly Meals 
on Wheels, have all seen an increase. There has also been a dramatic increase in requests for 
general information from both seniors themselves as well as family members of seniors. The 
need for the supportive services provided by the Geriatric Nurse Specialist to meet increased 
mental health needs of the elder population for seniors has nearly doubled in the past two years. 
We expect these trends will continue as people continue to live longer and to remain in the 
community rather than seek nursing home care. As we have seen most recently at the federal 
level with changes in the Medicare program and locally with fewer insurance providers and 
service options, the negative affects of the economy continue to impact the elderly population 
first, and often, most severely. 



Meals Served vs Revenue 



50,000 - 

40,000 - 

30,000 - 

20,000 - 

10,000 - 
n 


f 


1^ 


u 
■1 






u 


FY04 


FY05 


FY06 


FY07 est. 


tmm MOW Meals 
Served 


14,796 


16,202 


18,206 


20,278 


I I On-Site Meals 
Served 


1 1 ,460 


9,818 


10,570 


9,418 


MOW Revenue 


$22,868.5 


$23,938.3 


$27,759.5 


$40,794.0 


On-Site 
Revenue 


$14,972.4 

7 


$11,537.0 

7 


$11,566.3 
5 


$13,413.0 




MOW Meals Served 
On-Site Meals Served 
MOW Revenue 
On-Site Revenue 



75 






FY 2006 



Grants & 

Sale of 

Service 

18% 



Municipal 

Funding 

50% 




Volunteers 
32% 






76 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



ELDER SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



90,000 r 

80,000 

70,000 

60,000 

50,000 

40,000 | 

30,000 

20,000 

10,000 | 

o4 



§ 



cri 

m 
O 

"3" 



L1 



pN 



^ 



VVV'V'V'F'V'V'V' 



O Revenue 



□ Expenditure 



VALUE OF ELDER SERVICES 
VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 



$485,385 



$494,019 



600 \ $400,525 




$40^525 

!o45>» 
~ $368,498 



$220,782 



r\* _c\V _cv> 



eft 



V<?VT?'\? r \?'\?'\?'V 



$240,000 
$220,000 
$200,000 
$180,000 
$160,000 
$140,000 
$120,000 
$100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 




♦ $108,240 






30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 




SENIOR MEALS SERVED 









is 
o 

00 

■H 

— i 
^° 
H 




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* 




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CO 

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O 

rsi 
*6 





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is 

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o 

s 

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is 

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LTV 
rs! 





■F 



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^ ^ # $> ,/ ^ 



v 



D Meals-on-Wheels DOn-Site Lunches 



77 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

Andover Youth Services aims to provide young people with useful experiences to promote 
healthy growth and development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe 
and challenging youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young 
adolescents and their families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. These programs and services provide a direct link between 
the youth and their community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is the AYS 
mission to develop and maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all 
youth to use their creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the community 
service program, its after school adventure-based program, drop-in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 
24-hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and specialized 
in-school groups. 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people and then takes their 
ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young people, 
whether it is handing out flyers or creating plans for a new Youth Center, the programs created 
and implemented by Youth Services are immediate reflections of what the youth want and need. 
By staying true to its philosophy, each year AYS continues to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups and programs for all of Andover's young people. 

AYS PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Summer Program - Higher Ground - May to August 

The Summer of 2006 was another great adventure at Andover Youth Services. Through a 
series of fun and challenging activities, the young people who participate receive a chance to 
express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, supporting environment. Over a 
thousand young people joined the AYS Summer Program and had the best time of their lives. 
The 8-week Summer Program was entitled Higher Ground and offers a wide variety of trips, 
adventures and services that attract the interest of middle school students. The program 
encourages young people to participate and experience activities that are new, diverse and 
challenging. The outdoor adventures (rock climbing, backpacking, kayaking, etc.) provide 
opportunities to teach the value of natural resources in an exciting and fun manner. 

Ultimate Frisbee -Year round 

Young people indicated they wanted Ultimate Frisbee and AYS began the first middle school 
team in 2003. Based upon the success of the High School Ultimate Frisbee teams, the middle 
school boys and girls learned the multiple throws, offense and defense strategies and other 
skills in this fast-paced sport. 

78 



Field Hockey - Summer - Fall 

The AYS continued to expand a middle school girls field hockey team that competed against 
neighboring towns and brought high school students into a mentoring role by providing 
instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Volleyball - Winter 

The AYS continued its middle school volleyball league where students learned the necessary 

skills of passing, setting, serving, and hitting from high school mentors and coaches. Each of 

the three middle schools entered a separate boys and girls team for the end of the season 

tournament. 

Basketball, Open Gym - Year round 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a street hockey 
program, Open Gym and AYS High School Summer Basketball League became instant 
successes. Open gym provides a similar pick-up atmosphere for high school basketball 
players. The AYS Summer Basketball League was designed and developed by a high school 
senior, Jake Minton, and brings over a hundred players and spectators down to the AHS Field 
House for biweekly games and a season-ending tournament. 

Lacrosse - Year round 

AYS continues to expand Andover's lacrosse program and supports this growing year-round 
program by sustaining fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and volunteers. The youth 
league has experienced an overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional girls and boys 
teams have been added. AYS produced successful beginner programs for youths ages 8-10 
and pick up leagues for middle school boys and girls who wanted to improve their skills or 
learn the sport for the first time. Lacrosse has become a year-round effort offering clinics, 
introductory sessions and pick up sessions. 

Andover Snowboard Club - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share the love for the snow 
and travel to Sugarbush, Mt. Snow, Loon, Sunday River, Stratton for the US Open and more 
for some stellar outdoor recreation. The ASC ventures north monthly and also collaborates 
with the Phillips Academy Snowboard Club. 

Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag football, Field Hockey, Leam to Snowboard, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, spring 
open gym, Ultimate frisbee, Rugby, Middle school Intramurals, Track program, volleyball 
program, Outing Club, Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - September to June 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during holidays and vacation days for middle 
school and high school students. 

AYS EVENTS 

Keep It Wild Fashion Show - December to June 

The 7 th Annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 50 models a 
venue to expose their creative talents. Student designers sewed outfits and recruited models 

79 



who would showcase their work. The magnitude of the show required that the AHS Field 
House be transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing music and a 100- 
foot runway. 500 people turned out to this unique June event. 

Other Events 

Making Connections Check it Out - Police Forum Service Club annual event 

Concerts/Shows - Year round 

AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on concerts, 
dances, and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average we produce 
one to two shows per month. 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK - May to December 

The Skate Park is a positive and safe environment open to all ages and abilities, which 
promotes and encourages individual expression, and learning. It provides a positive atmosphere 
centered around respect for others and, most importantly, fun. The Skate Park continues to play 
an influential AYS role. Aside from normal hours of operation, many young people have the 
opportunity to participate in skateboarding lessons and clinics. High school mentors instruct 
youth on the various skateboarding tricks and ramp riding techniques. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year round 

Community Service - The willingness and enthusiasm of young people to serve their 
community is demonstrated over the course of several Community Service Days held 
throughout the year. 

Venture Out Program - Offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. 
The program creates a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ 
relationships. The young people are challenged mentally, physically and socially. By 
participating in this group, the youth will develop vital self-confidence that will carry into 
every aspect of their lives and community. 

Drop in and flexible office hours 

Court-related services 

Volunteer and intern opportunities 

Hospital visits 

Referrals 

Employment network 

College and Employment Recommendations 

Fundraising for youth programs 

Crisis intervention 

Outreach 

24-hour emergency response 

Parent support and education 

Discussion groups 

Specialized in-school groups 

Transportation 

80 



NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services remains dedicated to establishing a community-wide 
network of supportive services for young people. AYS works directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of these groups concentrates on developing programs, sendees and outreach to 
those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: Andover 
Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Inc., Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee, and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

Andover Youth Council 

AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. The council is comprised of 
thirteen high school students and three adult members from the community. The mission of 
the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth, to bring more services pertaining to issues 
relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower young people in the community by getting 
them involved with community organizations, schools, town government, in order to create 
opportunities for youth. The council has become an official part of the Town structure and 
their office is located in the Town Offices next to the Youth Services office. 

Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a youth center for the 
youth of Andover. 

Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency, and 
increasing a sense of belonging in the community of Andover. 

AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities and their 
goal is to be a community which is comfortable, inviting and accessible for people of any 
age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. 

Outward Bound, Girls Coalition, West Middle School PAC 

ADMINISTRATION - Year Round 

Hiring, supervising, and training seasonal, part-time staff, and volunteers. 



81 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover's 2,400 veterans and their families. In 2006, the Office 
responded to inquiries or requests from over 800 local veterans and provided direct financial 
assistance for fuel, food, housing, burials and medical needs to several dozen Andover families. The 
Town annually receives reimbursement from the Commonwealth for 75% of the funds provided to 
local veterans under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic ceremonies in observance of Veterans 
Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, and the anniversary of September 1 1 th and placed over 6,800 flags on 
the graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year 
were also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

Formal ceremonies were held on Memorial Day, Flag Day, July 4 th , POW/MIA Day, 
Veterans Day and Pearl Harbor Day. 

In 2006 the Office continued its long-standing practice of mailing "care packages" to those 
Andover residents serving in combat areas. 59 packages were prepared and mailed at NO expense 
to the taxpayers due to the generosity of Town employees and local citizens. 

Some highlights of 2006 include the completion and dedication of Andover's new Vietnam 
Veterans' Memorial and the finalization of the design process for the proposed Korean War 
Memorial. The monuments will be paid for entirely from private funds. The office was active in the 
local coordination of the new Commonwealth of Massachusetts Afghanistan/Iraq bonus program 
which pays service members deployed to combat zones a $1,000 bonus and those called to active 
duty outside combat zones S500. Record upgrading continued to be a priority in the office as was 
obtaining Federal benefits for local veterans. Although VA statistics are running substantially 
behind, Andover residents receive approximately 52,700,000 in tax-free Federal veterans' benefit 
dollars annually. An on-going project to compile all possible records on Andover Civil War veterans 
is nearing completion and will be the subject of a book when finalized 

The Veterans Services Office Director also serves as the Town's Graves Registration and 
Burial Officer. During 2006, eighty- four Andover veterans died - fifty were World War II veterans, 
twenty-six were Korean War veterans and twelve were Vietnam veterans. Several of these veterans 
fought in more than one war. 



82 



ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS - 2006* 



1) MILL, Jr., Victor J. 

2) SHEEHY, John 

3) SPARKS, James K. 

4) MORGAN, John G. 

5) DeVOIR, William E. 

6) POTHIER, Lomer J. 

7) SHARRY, James J. 

8) KIMBALL, Charles J. 

9) NO YES, Thomas B. 

10) McKEW, Charles A. 

11) ROCKWELL, Francis W. 

12) WERTHEIMER, Walter 

13) GORDON, Michael K. 

14) WILSON, Alan H. 

15) CRAIG, Hamilton G. 

16) IOVINO, John E. 

17) HEARL, Lance S. 

18) PAGEAU, Raymond A. 

19) SMITH, Lawrence A. 



Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


MM 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


Vietnam 


USAF 


Korea 


USCG 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 



83 



20) DUNN, Richard H. 

21) PASCUCCI, Vincent 

22) PROCTOR, John A. 

23) GERARD, William A. 

24) MUNN, James O. 

25) KEALLER, David 

26) HARHEN, Robert 

27) BENNETT, Jr., Allen S. 

28) BERNARD, Andrew J. 

29) WINN, Peter F. 

30) JACKSON, Carl 

31) O'Hagan, John J. 

32) FRACKIEWICZ, Boguslaw 

33) GRIGGS, Albert N. 

34) KATZ, M.D., Richard A. 

35) BALDWIN, Robert H. 

36) MURNANE, John J. 

37) MARKMAN, Ernest 

38) COLLINS, James Everett 

39) McMANAMIN, Edward 



Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


RAF 


Korea 


USCG 


Korea 


USAF 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


PA 


WWII POW 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 



84 



40) RANDIG, Wesley H. 

41) MURPHY, John J. 

42) JANNETTI, Carl 

43) MORGAN, William F. 

44) McGOWAN, Louis 

45) WASHBURN, Edwin D. 

46) PALENSKI, Edward A. 

47) BELISLE, Walter 

48) BURNS, Donald S. 

49) BUCK, Kenneth 

50) HOBIN, William P. 

51) HAGGERTY, James E. 

52) FINNERAN, William M. 

53) THOMPSON, Kenneth P. 

54) NADER, George J. 

55) WELDON, James P. 

56) VON KAHLE, Bernard B. 

57) MALLON, Dana J. 

58) HUGHES, Charles E. 

59) LAFITT, Roger J. 



Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII, Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII, Korea 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


USCG 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII, Korea 


USAF 


Korea 



85 



60) McKITTRICK, Lawrence G. 

61) RUSSELL, Francis 



62) COLE, Edward "Ted" 

63) NARTIFF, John J. 

64) PEARSON, Bradford C. 

65) DAVIS, Harrison 

66) HEVEHAN, Donald 

67) ROEHR, Andrew J. 

68) LUCY, Robert F. 

69) MARTIN, Bertrand R. 

70) SHIONIS, Charles 

71) RIKEMAN, Robert 

72) LAWSON, Jr., Edward R. 

73) MCNULTY, James F. 

74) CASWELL, John H. 

75) VANNETT, David L. 

76) KEARNS, Donald A. 

77) NAMAN, Alfred 

78) STOTT, Fred 

79) DARWIN, Richard 



USAF 


Vietnam 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


AAC 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Army 


Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 


USMC 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


Korea 


Navy 


Korea 


USAF 


WWII, Korea 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


USMC 


WWII 


Army 


Korea 



86 



80) CASELDEN, James E. Army, Navy Korea 

81) GORRIE, Everett R. Army WWII 

82) CURTIN, Thomas H. AAC WWII 

83) GALLANT, Roland J. Navy WWII 

84) BRUNO, Alfred E. Army WWII 



* The Andover Veterans Director compiled the above list. It is accurate to the best of his 
knowledge. Please report errors or omissions to him at (978) 623-8218. 



87 




ANNUAL REPORT 

2006 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, 

is to provide students with the knowledge, skill, and qualities 

required to be successful in a diverse society. 

During 2005 and 2006 the School Department was able to restore a few of the programs and services 
that had been reduced or eliminated in 2003. This gradual rebuilding was particularly noteworthy 
given the economic challenges of rising health insurance, utilities, and out-of-district SPED costs. The 
Rebuilding in 2006 was made possible with a modest increase in state aid, and to the commitment of 
this community to having an excellent school system. 



Restoration of Programs and Services in 2005-06 an 

For 2005-2006 
Buy Back Plan 

5.000: 

• Elementary Health Teachers 

• Elementary Reading Specialists 

• Middle School Health Teacher 

• Middle School Librarian 

• Middle School Music Teacher 

• Middle School Technology/Engineering teacher 

• High School Assistant Track Coaches 

• High School scheduler stipend 

• Program Advisors Salary Adjustments 

These positions were not funded in the rebuilding portion of 
budget; rather, from contingency and certification funding, as 
a result of the NEASC report. 1 



d 2006-07: 
For 2006-2007 

Year One of Five-Year Rebuilding & Advancing Plan 
9,000: 

• 5 th Grade PE Teachers 

• 3 rd Grade Instrumental Music 

• Elementary adjustment counselor time and reading 
support 

• Elementary School Nurse 

• Middle School Guidance/psychologist 

• AHS Assistant Principal 

• AHS Social Studies Teacher* 

• AHS Social Worker 

• AHS Music Teacher* 

• AHS Chinese Language Teacher* 

• AHS Clubs 



The 2006 funds were not sufficient to restore all programs, 2 nor did they enable the School Department 
to eliminate the fees that have been in place since 2003. 3 

Despite substantial financial constraints since 2003 we have managed to preserve our core curricular 
and athletic programs. 4 As a result our students have excelled in their academic work, and Andover 
Schools received prestigious awards. 
Our recent awards: 



1 The NEASC report stated that the high school might lose its accreditation if we did not increase course offerings to 
ensure that all students would be able to take the classes they needed. 



" The Five Year Plan outlines the needed restorations year-by-year. 

3 We charge fees for bus transportation for 7 through 12 th graders, athletics, all-day kindergarten, after school activities, 

and parking spaces at the high school. 

As we state in the Executive Summary of the 2007 Budget, "Four years ago, when we made substantial reductions, the 
Principals and I were determined to preserve core programs, and maintain class size at the elementary level. To keep our 
core programs, our high school class sizes increased and we decreased programs at all levels in physical education, 
health, reading, music, and guidance. We also eliminated administrative positions. As a result, our system has remamed 
strong in the core academic areas, and our students, with a SSlled staff and supportive parents, have excelled on 
standardized tests, in their core subjects, and in athletics." 



• MCAS scores are in the top 5 - 10% in the State 

• 95.7% of our students go on to post secondary education 

• 2006 Promising Practice Award to WMS's Engineering Program 

• 2005 Vanguard Model Award to AHS 

• 2005 DOE's Commonwealth Compass Award to AHS 

• Outperformers designation by Standard & Poors (three years in a row) 

• Gold Medal Designation by Expansion Management Magazine (two years in a row) 

• Ernest Dalton Memorial Award presented by the Boston Globe for overall excellence in high 
school athletics for division 1 schools (two years in a row) 

The FY07 Budget, with the exception of $370,000 for Rebuilding, was a level service budget. As a 
result, staff and parents voiced concerns during the 11 budget input sessions we hosted in fall 2006 that 
our students were lacking important programs and services, that our principals' workload was 
excessive, and that fees continued to place a financial burden on parents. 

Enrollment in our six elementary schools remained essentially unchanged with 2,809 students in 2005 
and 2,802 students in 2006. The middle schools saw an increase, going from 1,443 students in 2005 to 
1,459 students in 2006. The largest increase was at Wood Hill with 21 additional students. The high 
school saw a decrease in 2006 by 27 students, but with a total of 1,757 students, the school increased by 
over 350 students over last 9 years. Due to the high enrollment at the high school and to an increasing 
need for additional space in both the high school and our elementary schools, especially for special 
needs services, in fall 2005 the school department commissioned NESDEC 5 to do a space needs and 
enrollment projection study, which was completed in spring 2206. As a result of the study, in fall 2006 
the School Committee, in conjunction with the Board of Selectmen, appointed a Facilities Task Force to 
analyze reports by NESDEC and the Massachusetts School Building Authority and based on their 
findings make a recommendation to the School Committee for further action. The Task Force was 
made up of parent and community representatives, Town and School administrators, and 2 liaison 
members each from the School Committee, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee. 6 The Task 
Force, chaired by Mark Johnson, will report back to the School Committee spring 2007. 

The School Department's administrative team in 2006 remained stable, but three key administrators 
will retire in June 2007. They are: Steve Jankauskas, Principal of Sanborn Elementary School, Susan 
O'Brien, Pupil Personnel Administrator, and Michael Kistler, Out of District Coordinator. In order to 
prepare for increasing administrative shortages, Andover School Department hosted the Salem State 
TILE program. 7 T.I.L.E. classes began in 2005 at Wood Hill Middle School for the first cohort of 15 
aspiring administrators, four of whom were Andover teachers. We also embarked on an aggressive 
recruitment and retention program for both teachers and administrators, and joined with 14 other 
districts in organizing our 2 nd annual Merrimack Valley Recruitment Fair held in March 2006. The 
2007 Fair will be held in March. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND CENTRAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

The five elected members of the School Committee typically met twice monthly during 2006. Dr. 
Arthur Barber and Dr. Tony James were re-elected in March, 2006. In April, attorney Debra 
Silberstein stepped down as Chair, replaced by Dr. James. Mr. Arthur Barber was elected secretary. 
During the summer, the School Committee completed its evaluation of the superintendent and 
approved the Goals and Objectives for the 2006-2007 school year. 



5 New England School Development Council 

6 Members of the Task Force are: Mark Johnson, Chair, Diane Costagliola, Tom Deso, Alix Driscoll, Dennis Forgue, 
Ruth Galvin, with liaison members, Jon Stumpf and Mary O'Donoghue (Finance Committee, Art Barber and Tony 
James (School Committee), and Brian Major, Ted Teichert, and John Hess (Selectman) Buzz Stapczynski, Evan Katz, 
Claudia Bach, Joe Piantedosi 89 

7 T.I.L.E .... Get full name 



The goals are: 

• Goal: Student Achievement 

We will maintain programs and practices that ensure that all students meet clearly defined high standards 
that result in on-going improved performance, and where needed, we will design, develop, implement, 
and evaluate new programs and practices. 

• Goal: Educator Quality 

We will attract and retain well-trained highly motivated teachers and administrators who are committed 
to enhancing student achievement and to lifelong professional development. 

• Goal: Finances/Budget 

We will engage in an inclusive open budget process that is driven by need to ensure student achievement 
while maximizing the use of taxpayers' dollars. 

• Communications and Action Planning 

We will create a dynamic and comprehensive plan, which ensures collaboration and partnership among 
the Andover Public Schools, Town government, and the Andover community. 

The School Committee held work sessions during the summer 2006 to discuss the 2008 budget and 
prepare for collective bargaining. The School Committee also held meetings in the summer and in the 
fall and winter 2006 with the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee to review budget 
assumptions and discuss health insurance costs and upcoming collection bargaining. Contract 
negotiations between the School Committee and the Andover Education Association commenced in fall 
2006 and are underway at this time. A sub-committee of the School Committee continued to work with 
MASC's 8 Mike Gilbert in a comprehensive Policy review, and expects the revamped Policy Book to be 
completed in 2007. 

Assistant Superintendent - Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment and Professional Development 
Curriculum and Instruction: 

The administration, teachers, and staff continued to work diligently to provide a coherent and 
challenging curriculum and instructional program to all students in the Andover Public Schools. The 
review and revision of curricula programs and instructional practice are ongoing in the district and 
aligned with the district goals. The district leadership for teaching and learning is led by the Assistant 
Superintendent in concert with the content area Curriculum Councils, the Principals, the building level 
curriculum leaders and teacher leaders in all disciplines. This year, as always, the groups brought 
forward program revisions and textbook adoptions and instructional technology needs. $255,000 
funded the purchase of materials and programs in mathematics, science, English/language arts, social 
studies, and foreign language. The focus in 2006 was on Elementary Balanced Literacy Model, Middle 
School Engineering/Technology program and Expeditionary Learning Model, and the High School 
Integrated Math Program. Additionally, at the High School, the introduction of Chinese in the Foreign 
Language department provided increased opportunities for students to expand their language 
acquisition. At the Elementary Schools, an instructional program in music with focus on the strings 
introduced more students to instrumental music. 

Professional Development: 

Administrators and faculty continued to participate in the model of building professional learning 
communities, a vision and model of continuous improvement and learning for both adults and children. 
In 2006 each level determined a focus. High School: at-risk students, Middle School; the Middle School 
Model for Adolescents and Learning, and Elementary: Differentiating Instruction to Reach All 
Learners. Through a vigorous professional development program, over forty-four courses were offered 
to teachers and staff, involving over 680 participants. With enhanced pedagogy and deepened content 
knowledge, teachers and administrators brought more informed and enlightened thinking to their 
work. One of the components of the federal No Child Left Behind Act required teachers to meet the 
standard of "highly qualified" aligning with the state requirements regarding licensure and 
recertification. 

90 



8 Massachusetts Association of School Committees 



Assessments: 

Students in grades one through eleven participated in local assessments to evaluate their learning in 
mathematics, English/language arts, science, and social studies. The Massachusetts Comprehensive 
Assessment System (MCAS) was administered to students in grades three through eight and grade ten 
with an increase in testing in science and social studies. Andover students continued to achieve a solid 
performance on these assessments. All students in the class of 2007 passed the MCAS test which is a 
mandatory for graduating students. Additionally all of our schools achieved "Adequate Yearly 
Progress" as a benchmark for achieving proficiency for all students by the year 2014 as required by the 
federal No Child Left Behind Act. In the college admission process, 470 students participated in the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). In the class of 2007, there were six semi-finalists for the National 
Merit Scholarship Program and twenty-seven commended students. In terms of the Advanced 
Placement tests which qualify students who pass to receive college credit, two hundred ninety-one (291) 
students took five hundred and six (506) exams with an average score of 4.01 (scale 1-5). Of those 
students, eighty-three (83) were deemed AP Scholars, a distinction given to students who receive grades 
of 3 or higher on three or more AP exams. In total 95.7% of our students went on to post secondary 
education with 87% going on to four-year colleges and universities. 

Business Office 

The first full year of operations under Business Administrator Evan Katz included improvements to 

existing services and introduced some new approaches. Highlights included: 

New Bus Contractor For Athletics and Field Trip— improved reliability and quality of athletic and 

field trip bus service with new vendor. 

Expanded Budget Format - revised budget presentation to improve clarity of school budget, 

including grants and non-tax supported spending. 

Food Service Director - hired new food service director who immediately increased sales and 

introduced a healthier menu. 

Town Hall Relations - strengthened relations with Town Hall in the areas of budget, facilities 

maintenance, and other areas of mutual concern. 

Grants Management - simplified grant management by reducing number of staff whose salary is 

paid from grant funds and a second source. 

Personnel Tracking - expanded personnel tracking and budget monitoring by working with 

administrators and principals to develop a comprehensive work location personnel roster. Also 

added non-tax supported staff to personnel tracking system. 

Expanded Support for Transportation Services - increased staff dedicated to management of 

transportation services in order to improve oversight of bus transportation and crossing guard 

management. 

Energy Management - Reduced electricity and heating oil consumption by implementing with the 

Plant and Facilities Department a system wide energy conservation program. 

• Custodial Services - assisted principals in management of custodial staff; also established a 
substitute custodian pool for to maintain building services during staff vacancies or illness. 

• Contracts - Negotiated successor labor agreements with Food Service workers and custodians. 
Food service contract included one-time incentive compensation based on sales performance. 

• Ongoing School Support - 

o Photocopier Replacement - ensured lowest cost and correct copier service bundle. 

o Reduced Paperwork - replaced some purchase orders with faster, simpler internal 

requisition approval process; introduced electronic transmission of payroll data. 
o Copy Center - marketed availability of Central Office printing services. 

The overall responsibilities of the Business Office are managing financial operations and selected 
support services. This includes developing the annual budget, processing payables, payroll, labor 
contract negotiation and compliance, purchasing, fee collection, financial reporting, development of the 
Capital Improvement Plan and grant management. The Business Office, which includes the Copy 
Center, works with the entire school system and many Town Departments. In addition to financial 
oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities management (in cooperation with the Plant 



and Facilities Department), student transportation, school and district emergency management, 
custodial services and food service. 

Human Resources Office 

Much time and effort was devoted in 2006 in exploring ways to computerize processes and bring 
innovative and affordable software solutions to our work. To date, we have looked at ways to manage 
employee attendance, the application process, and substitute teacher placement through innovative 
software solutions. We will continue to explore technological solutions to our needs in order to 
maximize our productivity and service efficiencies. 

Andover Public Schools was one of 37 communities, of which only 16 participants were successful, in 
transmitting tremendous amounts of teacher data to the Department of Education. This project, 
known as EPIMS (Education Personnel Information Management System), is part of a federal 
requirement under the No Child Left Behind Act to track and monitor teachers state-wide. The 
Human Resource staff spent months collecting very comprehensive data about teachers' educational 
backgrounds, their daily teaching schedule, and the licensing to date. Successful transmission of this 
data was made to the DOE in December. We have now completed an enormously time consuming 
federal mandate that lays ahead for many other cities and town in the Commonwealth. 

We also developed a strategic plan to address wellness initiatives as part of a grass roots strategy to 
contain health care costs. A team of town and school employees will work with the Benefits and 
Compensation Manager to bring several wellness programs into every work site. To date, our staff has 
organized weight watcher programs and various exercise challenges and friendly competition among 
departments. We provide employees with monthly wellness bulletins. And, finally, we have reached 
out to our smoking employees with information about a number of smoking cessation programs. 

We have also worked to bring leaders from Town and School together to address the issue of building, 
supporting and celebrating a diverse workforce and community in Andover. Team members have 
spent four intensive days with Visions, Inc., a leader in providing organizations with the training and 
support needed to develop multicultural awareness in the workplace. This work is on going and an 
action plan is forthcoming. 

As always, training and recruitment were constant activities for human resource staff. In 2006, 
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination provided training to a large percentage of our 
school staff. Our relationship continued with Northern Essex Community College and employees were 
given an opportunity to join a Teambuilding class. Competition for teachers is fierce in today's 
market. Andover has taken a step toward insuring a healthy applicant pool by working with 30 
communities in the Merrimack Valley to host a Teacher Recruitment Fair. This year, as in the last two 
years, the results have been very successful. Approximately 700 teacher candidates attend this annual 
event. 

REPORTS FROM THE SCHOOLS: 
Andover High School 
Foreign Language Department 

In an increasingly competitive and open world, the demand for students to be "global trade literate, 
sensitive to foreign cultures, and conversant in different languages" (Time magazine) is rising. In order 
to meet this demand the Foreign Language Department has taken several steps. The most exciting 
initiative was the addition of Mandarin Chinese as a pilot program this year at the high school. The 
second year course will be added in September '07 as this program will continue to expand. To further 
meet the global demand for multilingual students, the Foreign Language Department is actively 
encouraging students to take two sequential language courses in one year to accelerate them through 
the program, thus attaining a higher level of proficiency upon graduation. Other students are opting to 
study two languages. Following the "Year of Languages" of 2005, 2006 was declared the year of 
"Discovering Languages", with an emphasis on encouraging students to study abroad. For the third 
year, Mr. Thomas Powers led a group of students #2VIexico for an immersion experience during 



February vacation that included both intensive morning classes and a family home-stay. All of these 
initiatives are moving us slowly forward to meet the needs of our changing world. 

Mathematics Department 

In 2006 the mathematics department developed new electives for the next school year. Discrete 
Mathematics and The History of Mathematics will be offered to students in the 2007-2008 school year. 
Also, due to our partnership with the University of Lowell in 2006 we had fourteen students taking a 
course in Engineering Differential Equations for college credit. This course met at Andover High 
School in the evening. 

Science Department 

The science department implemented new electives in Earth Science, Astronomy, and Geology in 2006. 
These course offerings helped to diversify our elective program and give students additional 
opportunities to expand their science knowledge. Also, we were in the process of developing a new 
Physical Science course for juniors and seniors who completed the Life Science sequence. After 
completing this course the students will be able to take advantage of several other science offerings 
such as Chemistry and Physics. 

Social Studies Department 

In conjunction with K-12 Curriculum Council, the Social Studies Department revised and refined its 
foundation benchmarks (in line with Massachusetts State Frameworks) in both the grade 9 World 
Civilization and grade 10 U.S History courses. The department began researching new materials, texts, 
and technologies to better implement our revised foundation curriculum. Staff development work 
during the summer of 2006 and continuing during the school year focused on the following elective 
offerings: Contemporary World Issues, Psychology, Broadcast Journalism and Advanced Placement 
European History. Additionally two Democracy and Media Literacy teachers participated at this year's 
National Conference on Media Reform in Memphis. The Social Studies Department began designing a 
new course offering in global economics and piloting a new course, Democracy in Action, Senior 
Internships. Along with its required academic work relating to the workings of democracy, the course 
affords high school seniors an opportunity to engage actively in the community by working at a 
government office or nonprofit organization. In the summer of 2006 and in the current school year, 
AHS social studies teachers took training in a cross-disciplinary approach to improve Adolescent 
Literacy. Five members of the department were actively engaged in the K-12 professional mentoring 
program run by one of the department members. 

English Department 

Based on our K-12 Curriculum Council, on data analysis of MCAS results, and on revised SAT 
requirements, the English Department continued to revise its curriculum, course offerings, and 
instructional practices. MCAS data past two years demonstrated noteworthy gains in understanding 
poetry and classic (non-contemporary) texts. In addition, MCAS testing continued to show high scores 
for Andover students in Standard English grammar and mechanics. Central to these successes were 
revised foundation curricula in grades 9 and 10, the adoption of new texts, and professional 
development work on instructional practice in poetry, classic texts, and language instruction. 
Similarly, elective offerings for juniors and seniors were revised and improved through the addition of 
new texts, supported by professional development for teachers; these included Modern American 
Literature, Dramatic Literature and Creative Writing. In 2006 the department piloted a new elective 
offering for juniors and seniors: Cultural Revolutions investigates the literary woks of Saharan Africa, 
India, Iran and Iraq, and China. The department was especially pleased with its role in working to 
improve literacy instruction: along with their middle school/high school colleagues in other disciplines, 
English teachers and their Special Education counterparts helped research, design and implement new 
strategies to improve reading skills for all adolescent readers. 

Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department was pleased to welcome Toni Kirby, Social Worker, back to Andover High 

School. Mrs. Kirby rejoined the team after workin!g3n the Student Assistance Program at Nashua High 



School in New Hampshire. A tremendous social worker, Mrs. Kirby took on a full caseload of 55 
students who were dealing with a variety of emotional issues. In addition to the individual sessions, 
Mrs. Kirby co-facilitated the Grief Group with Michael Wartman and was scheduled to begin a group 
for students suffering from anxiety. 

During the first semester of the school year, the Counseling Department worked diligently with seniors 
on the college application process. By the January 1 st deadline, 422 students (95%) had submitted 
2,465 transcript requests to 359 different colleges. Early admission results were encouraging and 
included acceptances from Assumption College, Babson College, Bates College, Boston College, Cornell 
University, Georgetown University, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Northeastern University, 
Northwestern University, Providence College, Vassar College and Wheaton College. 

The kick-off event of the College Admissions Process for junior parents was a great success. John 
Mahoney, the Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Boston College, addressed over 300 very 
attentive parents and students on the college admissions process and factors in admission. During the 
February I s ' evening program, organized by Peggy Cain and Alicia Linsey, parents were provided with 
a written guide for supporting their students in the college planning process. In addition, TCCi Family 
Connection by Naviance, an online resource for college counseling, was demonstrated. On February 
15th, all juniors attended a class meeting where a panel of college representatives from Bentley College, 
Boston University, Clark Univeristy, Northern Essex Community College, Tufts University and 
UMASS Amherst, discussed what admission officers are looking for in candidates, admissions criteria 
and recent trends in college admissions. Upcoming College Counseling events included small group 
and individual sessions for juniors, where they complete several self-assessment activities, explore 
factors to consider in selecting colleges, and receive tips on college visits, essays, interviews, and college 
admissions criteria. In addition, on April 1 0"' the juniors will attend a field trip to the National College 
Fair being held at the Boston Bayside Expo Center. Counselors will also meet with all underclassmen 
to discuss the course selection process for the 2007-2008 school year. 

Doherty Middle School 

The year 2006 saw several new teachers hired to replace those who either retired or moved to different 
districts. New to the staff were Thomas Desjardins (Science), Erik Smith (Special Needs), Stephanie 
Schlie (English), Melissa Sessions (Mathematics), Sonia Tammaro (Guidance/Psychologist) and 
Andrew Long (Foreign Language). The addition of these highly qualified educators enabled Doherty 
Middle School to continue its commitment to the team concept and the overall middle school 
philosophy that has been part of the Andover Public Schools since 1988. Due to the efforts of the 
Doherty School Improvement Council, the Superintendent of Schools, and the Andover School 
Committee, Doherty was in a position to strengthen the guidance services at the school. In addition, 
with the help of the Board of Selectman a significant change was made in the traffic pattern around the 
school that improved student safety. 

West Middle School 

West Middle School has continued to focus on values that enhance our school climate and that build 
character. With the support of our School Council, our faculty worked hard in the spring (and a 
smaller cohort worked in the summer) to develop a learning model we call "Taking a Stand." Within 
this model, our 6 th graders explored "Appreciating Diversity." Our 7 th graders were "Building 
Bridges," and our 8 th graders were finding ways to build "Leadership" within our school. A correlate 
to "Taking A Stand" is a program we call "WEB" - "Where Everyone Belongs." Students selected in 
the spring were trained in the summer so that we could launch "WEB" in the fall - 8 th grade mentor- 
leaders who worked throughout the year with clusters of 6 tb graders. Thus, every 6 th grader knew an 
8 th grader as his/her "WEB Leader." The early enthusiasm for "WEB" led us to build other leadership 
roles for students within our school. On a different note, the Engineering program that we launched in 
the fall of 2005 was recognized as a "Promising Practice" Program by the Mass Insight Education and 
Research Institute. This fall we also united our library/media and technology programs, so that all of 
our students were introduced to 21 st century research skills, integrated with existing team-based 
curriculum. We brought to WMS the IMove program to promote more nutritious lunches at WMS. 
And finally, we continued to reap great benefits from our parent volunteers, coordinated through our 



tireless PAC, who, among so many projects, helped our library and office to hum, and our courtyard to 
flower. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

Wood Hill Middle School can no longer consider itself to be in the rookie years. In 2006 we were five 
years young and have made major strides in becoming a "true" Middle School. Expeditionary 
Learning continued to be our vehicle to reach our vision. The teachers of Wood Hill put their energy 
into implementing well researched practices that were seeing major benefits for all of our students. It 
is important to note that Expeditionary Learning has been completed funded by organizations such as 
ACE, Andona, Wakefield Inc., Service Club, and by anonymous individual. We are also excited that 
Wood Hill started a new Support Classroom in 2006, which educated students with more serious 
learning disabilities, such as autism. This has been a benefit for both those students and the Wood Hill 
community as a whole. It is only right that every child have an opportunity to be educated in their 
neighborhood school. As we move forward there are positions that we would like to put in place to 
ensure that all our students are well equipped for the 21st Century. These include an Integrated 
Technology position as well as Engineering. As one of our staff members said, "The students of Wood 
Hill are going to create miracles in the future." We greatly appreciate the community's support as we 
move forward. 

Bancroft Elementary School 

"Community is the basic lesson of the classroom" -Greg Henry Quinn 

Bancroft School, an open-concept school built in 1969, was designed to be different in every way. 
Providence architect William W. Warner conceived of a building that would integrate the imaginative 
qualities of a castle (with towers, moats and arches) and an old fashioned New England barn (with 
exposed beams and expansive lofts). Today, this "openness" of design truly lends itself to the strong 
feeling of community within our school with students, parents and staff working together toward a 
common goal of life-long learning. Community, however, does not end at the classroom door - it is a 
pervasive and overarching philosophy throughout the Bancroft School. In 2006 special relationships 
with Phillips Academy, Andover High School, the Andover Senior Center, the Andover Rotary Club 
and the Doherty Middle School enabled our students to experience a unique mentoring program. 
Additional partnerships with the Andover Historical Society and Memorial Hall Library enabled the 
students and their families to extend and link the curriculum they have learned in the classroom. 
Naturally, partnerships between the school and home environment are key to the success of the 
children in all aspects of their education. Parental involvement is vital to making Bancroft a 
community of learners. In 2006, opportunities for parental involvement included classroom volunteers, 
participation in the PTO, and as instructors in our extended day programming "Expanding Horizons." 
On behalf of our staff and students, I want to thank all of the agencies, organizations and people who 
helped to make Bancroft School a special place to learn and grow. 

High Plain Elementary School 

Celebrating its five year anniversary, High Plain Elementary established "The Key Is Me - Unlock 
Your Talents" as its school wide theme. The staff met prior to the opening of school to create classroom 
projects and instructional strategies to celebrate the multiple intelligences and to promote social 
responsibility through community service. Parents were important partners in all these initiatives. In 
2006 our PTO challenged every student and family to make a difference by selecting a community 
service project from a list of over 100 possible ideas to work as individuals, groups or teams and share 
a common goal to help others. This challenge was fulfilled in many ways from making blankets for the 
homeless, to disaster relief packages, and personal letters for our military and veterans. Parent 
volunteers continued to facilitate ELF (Environmental Learning for the Future) a hands-on science 
program for grades K-5 now in its third year and the Agilent Technology physical science workshops 
for grades 4 and 5. Our Senior volunteers offered reading support for grade K-2 students and packed 
"book bags" of suggested 'just right reading materials' for home use. The combined leadership of 
teachers and parents enhanced the variety of enrichment programs offered during and beyond the 
school day. Cooking Club, Stock Market for Beginning Investors, "The Think Tank", Special Art, 
"Food Fun and Fitness", and Media Messages werf put a few of the new course offerings in addition to 
the new third grade instrumental program that was established throughout the district this year. We 



also welcomed back the return to two periods of physical education in grade five and thank the 
Andover community for their support. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Our school theme, "Celebrate Learning", set the tone for the year. All Sanborn faculty members 
participated in the district-wide early release day workshops dedicated to the implementation of our 
"balanced literacy" approach to reading instruction. With the assistance of our PTO Enrichment 
Committee, we highlighted each academic area with activities such as Author's Teas, Math Survivor 
Day, a school-wide Science Fair and Biography Projects. A new Student Council approach involved 
almost every fourth and fifth grade student as a participant on one of our ten student directed 
committees. Student Council members employed Sanborn's four Rs, Respect, Responsibility, 
Resourcefulness and Reflection, to carry out a number of community service projects including raising 
money for: the Greater Boston Food Bank through the Turkeys for America Challenge, Neighbors in 
Need and the Katrina Relief Fund, the Cystic Fibrosis Fund, the donation of books and games to 
Children's Hospital, and participation in the annual Toys for Tots collection sponsored by the United 
States Marine Corps. After thirty-seven years as a teacher, special educator and administrator, I, 
Principal Steve Jankauskas, will be retiring at the end of the current school year. On behalf of our 
present and future students, I want to thank the citizens of Andover, our town and school employees, 
our loyal cadre of volunteers and our many private benefactors for your continued support. 

Shawsheen Primary School 

In addition to our overarching theme The Golden Rule, the school wide theme beginning in September 
was Countries of the World . Each class studied a certain country and buddied with other classes for 
projects and sharing. The PTO sponsored many cultural events celebrating diversity and other 
cultures. Our integrated preschool program continued to grow, ending the year with 82 students. 
Weekly all school assemblies were devoted to diversity, cultural enrichment, Reader's Theatre, music 
and student authored plays. We continued our involvement with Marland Place seniors and are 
partnering with the Merrimack Valley Jewish Coalition for Literacy, which trains and provides 
individual tutors for students. Several student teachers worked in classrooms in 2006. The PTO 
funding also provided an opportunity for us to participate in the Four Winds Science Program which 
trains parent volunteers to present four hands-on science projects to each classroom. Our first annual 
Math-a-Thon raised almost $14,000 for curriculum enrichment, balanced literacy materials and 
beautification projects for Shawsheen. The cafeteria was completed with PTO purchasing cabinets and 
new cafeteria tables. Parents and children continued to plant and maintain the flower garden facing the 
street. Capital Improvement: All classrooms on the second floor were painted and new floors installed. 
The boys' bathroom on the lower floor was redone with new stalls, tiled floor and sinks. The cupola 
was fixed and some roof tiles replaced. 

South School 

"Unlocking the Keys to Learning Success" set the theme for the 2006 school year at South Elementary. 
This theme centered on the keys of respect, responsibility, kindness, and creativity. Embracing our 
theme, we engaged in meaningful learning experiences. In order to make these opportunities 
successful, we were grateful for the tremendous contributions of our parents, teachers, staff members, 
and business partnerships. South continued to have a highly involved parent community and high 
achieving students. Parents volunteered in classrooms, chaperoned field trips, assisted in the selection 
of cultural enrichment programs, organized visits and presentations by authors and illustrators and 
served on teacher interview committees, and helped to procure foundation monies and grants. The 
PTO which has over 20 committees continued to give tremendous financial support to the children and 
programs at South. We continued to have a strong professional learning community at South. 
Teachers engaged in many staff development initiatives to add best teaching practices to their 
repertoires. This year teachers discussed two books, Wlxat Great Teachers Do Differently and Whatever 
It Takes. Another staff initiative was focused on our Balanced Literacy work and differentiated 
instruction to benefit all learners at South. South students were engaged in many school wide and 
classroom learning experiences. Here are some highlights of our school year: Tide pool presentation, 
Celebration of Writing, Pen Pals in Lowell, PoetrycJ^Judy, Eminent Person Projects, Andover Historical 
Society visits, Space Center 3-D, Massachusetts Book Award Program, Readers Cafe, Morning 



Readers, Art Expo, Social Health: Community Health, Teamwork/Cooperation and our school play, 
Charlotte's Web. Our technology program included NetSmartz, Internet Safety/Ethics, and Research 
Skills. Our students were active in student government where they had a voice in the school through 
Student Issues, Community Service, and Spirit Committees. Our year ended with the retirement of 
Antonia Kulcsar, a dedicated second grade teacher. We appreciate and thank the Andover 
Community for supporting the important work of education our children. 

West Elementary School 

West Elementary School students once again engaged in a number of academic and community-wide 
activities that extended beyond the regular curriculum and the school day. Our March of Dimes event 
raised more than $3,500, again making West Elementary one of the better fundraisers among the New 
England Affiliate participants. The Easter Seals Shoot Out again raised more than $4,000 in 2006. 
West Elementary's Math Olympiad teams continued to do well by once again placing in the top ten 
percent of all participating schools, including those who have sixth grade team members. WERAWC, 
West Elementary Readers and Writers Conference, held in March, featured writers, performers, and 
artists. Featured artists this year were, Valerie Tutson, Matt Tavares, Ted Scheu, Peter Birle, Amy 
Anne Broyles, MaryAnn Cocco-Leffler, Jacqueline Davies, Ben Edwards, Mitali Perkins, and Penny 
Kohut. The student council collected goods for the People's Pantry and The Community Day Care 
Program in Lawrence. West Elementary also had a council-sponsored school store that raised money 
for student activities, a Before-School Enrichment Program, Grade 4/5 Chorus, Grade 3 Chorus, Chess 
Club, Destination Imagination, Wyeth Institute Science Enrichment program. Johns Hopkins Talent 
Search, and Buddies-Upper grade classes paired with primary classes. The final phase of the asbestos 
abatement and renovation project was completed during the summer of 2006. 

DISTRICT DEPARTMENTS: 

Pupil Personnel Department 

Pupil Personnel Administration continued to oversee special education services to approximately 1,000 
identified students between the ages of 3 and 22. Programs were available to address the needs of 
students with mild to moderate learning disabilities as well as those with more severe multiple 
handicaps. To the extent possible, special education students attended their neighborhood school and 
participated with their typically developing peers in the general education setting. The Department 
continued its commitment to work with families to retain students in the district (rather than sending 
them to out-of-district programs), and provided consultation, training, and support to in-district staff 
in order to meet the complex needs of some of our students. One important aspect was our ongoing 
collaboration with Melmark New England, a school for autistic children and those with severe 
behavioral challenges, which relocated to Andover in November 2006. Melmark consultants continued 
to visit schools regularly to assist in behavioral planning. They played a key role in helping to design 
and support a new class for six students with intensive special needs at Wood Hill Middle School. Staff 
members and parents were able to access training (oftentimes free) through Melmark, so having the 
school located in our town has proved to be an asset. In addition to supporting our special needs 
students, the Pupil Personnel Department also oversaw programs for educating English Language 
Learners (ELL). While Andover continued to be a 'low incidence' district in terms of actual numbers 
of ELL students, we saw an increase in the number of ELL students in our district, as well as changes 
in how those students were distributed among the schools. In addition, new state mandates now 
require that we provide training for general education staff that have ELL students in their classrooms. 
As a result of the increasing numbers of ELL students and the training two of our ELL teachers will be 
providing later this spring, we had to add some ELL teaching time in the district. 

Health Education Department 

The Andover Health Education Department supports, delivers, and evaluates a coordinated health 
education program for all students. Health educational professionals align the curriculum with the 
Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework recommended by The Massachusetts Board of 
Education. Health teachers infused our elementary school children with instruction on building 
positive self-concepts and decision making techniques. Secondary students were given accurate, current 
health knowledge so that they may achieve their highest potential for well being. 



Community network teams such as Andover's Community Health Advisory Team met to build safe 
schools and community. Peer Leadership, G.U.T.S. (Growing Up Taking A Stand), and G.L.A.M. 
(Girls, Leaders, Advocates & Mentors) membership at Andover High taught students to take an active 
role as models for positive health decisions. S.A.D.D. increased awareness of alcohol and drug misuse. 
The Parent-to-Parent Speaker Series established a program of speakers that directly tied curriculum 
initiatives to parent awareness. Speakers introduced parents to topics such as resiliency, stress, and 
resolution of conflicts. Dr. Robert Brooks spoke on "Raising Resilient Children" and Dr. Michael 
Bradley addressed "Teens and Their Parents". A panel of local experts led a discussion of "Risky 
Business." 

Fine and Performing Arts Department 

Performing Arts: 

Students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. There are 620 Grades 3-12 participating in 

choruses. Instrumental and vocal students continued to participate through the audition process for 

district and state ensembles, and earned the following awards: 5 students - Senior District, 1 vocal, 4 

instrumental ( 1 Orchestra, 3 Band), 13 students - Junior District, 8 vocal, 5 instrumental (4 Orchestra, 

1 Band) 

Visual Arts: 

At Andover High School 21 student's artwork was submitted to The Boston Globe and earned the 
following awards: 1 Silver Key, 3 Gold Key, 12 Honorable Mentions, 1 Gold Keys - Senior Portfolio, 2 
AHS students were nominated to Art All-State, 1 Gold Key with National Recognition. AHS presented 
a 3 rd Annual Art Show at Andover Historical Society named "Contemporary Artists' Series". Some of 
the AHS art students were accepted at the following colleges: One student accepted to RISD, one to 
Parsons in New York, one to MICA. At GLEC - the Collaborative Visual Arts Show in Lawrence at 
the Heritage Park Museum in May - we had seven students exhibit in 2006. JooHee Yoon won National 
Scholastics Award in Painting in May 2006. Her work was displayed in Washington DC. She received 
her award at Carnegie Hall, NYC. Only 1200 students were recognized at this level in the country. 

Dramatic Arts: 

Curricular: Our Technical Theatre course continued to attract many students and was flourishing. We 
continued to offer Survey of American Film, Art of Theatre, and Musical Theatre Workshop and 
Improvisation and Advanced Acting and enrollment continues to be high in all. 

Extra-curricular: The year 2006 was a particularly fruitful one for the Andover High School Drama 
Guild. Our entry in the MHSDG Festival Competition, The Dining Room, by A.R. Gurney went all the 
way to the final level of competition in Boston, as one of 15 finalists chosen from an original field of 
over 100 schools. It was the first time in over 50 years that AHS had advanced to the final round of 
state competition. The Dining Room received many acting and technical awards at each round of 
competition. In March 2006 auditions were held for our annual Spring Drama Production, Our 
Country's Good, by Timberlake Wertenbaker. In April Drama Guild's Production of Joseph and the 
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat had been nominated for nine (9) aw ards as a part of the North Shore 
Music Theater Spotlight Awards including Best Musical. Auditions were held also in September for the 
fall production of Into the Woods and culminated in five well-attended performances in November 
2006. Into the Woods was selected to participate in the North Shore Music Theatre Spotlight Awards, 
one of 25 schools that were selected. 

Technology Department 

The Technology Department strove to meet our continuing goal of enhancing student learning with the 
application of technological tools to assist our students with accessing, collecting, authenticating, 
managing, assessing, and analyzing information effectively and ethically. We also supported the 
administrative functions of the schools district and the monitoring operations of the Town's Plant & 
Facilities Department. In all, we supported 6800 users, 2400 computers and 900 e-mail accounts. Due 
to budget constraints we have had to move from a five year computer replacement schedule to a seven 
year computer replacement schedule. We continued to repurpose our legacy equipment, moving 

98 



existing equipment that has been replaced by new computers to other locations within the school 
district replacing our oldest equipment. 

The Health, Media Specialist, and Instructional Technology Specialist implemented the NetSmartz 
Internet Safety program in 2006. In support of our Internet Safety program, Microsoft Corporation 
generously donated 2500 NetSmartz mouse pads worth an estimated $7,500 to our elementary schools 
and students. These colorful mouse pads display the NetSmartz Online Safety Rules. Eighteen 
NetSmartz presentations were held in 2006 informing parents of the benefits, challenges and risks of 
the Internet. Please visit www. netsmartz.org for more information. 

Physical Education Department 

Our K-12 Physical Education teachers strove to instill in their students an understanding of the 
importance of physical fitness and activity and the critical role it plays in their overall lifetime health 
and well-being. Implementing a comprehensive curriculum that was based upon the National 
Association for Sport and Physical Education standards as well as the Massachusetts Health 
Curriculum frameworks, our PE teachers taught students a wide variety of movement concepts, health 
related components and skill related components of physical fitness as well as sports skills and activities 
that promote a healthy and active lifestyle. In addition to these curricular offerings elementary and 
middle school physical education teachers ran successful American Heart Association Jump Rope for 
Heart and Hoops for Heart programs. A school district fifth grade track and field meet as well as 
separate 4 th and 5 th grade and middle school cross country meets were conducted by the respective 
physical education staffs. High School Physical Education teacher Carol Martini continued to serve on 
the AAHPERD national committee for teaching standards. Brian McNally, department coordinator, 
served as the state MAHPERD vice-president for the division of Boys and Men's Athletics. Several 
members of the Physical Education department presented sessions at the MAHPERD state convention. 

Athletic Department 

The Athletic Department is committed to the philosophy that participants are students first and 
athletes second. Interscholastic athletics is a co-curricular activity with the practice and contest arena 
serving as an extension of the classroom. Along with the skills and strategies of their particular sport 
coaches taught the values associated with discipline, teamwork, commitment, accountability, 
citizenship, confidence and leadership. Andover High School for the second year in a row was recipient 
of the Ernest B. Dalton Award from the Boston Globe for combined boys and girls winning percentage. 
Andover boys with a 147-56-3 record and girls with a 162-33-13 record led the state of Massachusetts 
in total wins. Andover won the league championship in fifteen different sports. The girls swimming and 
diving team won their eighth straight Massachusetts State Championship led by Coach Marilyn 
Fitzgerald at Harvard University. 

On behalf of students, parents and staff, I thank the town of Andover for its ongoing support of our 
schools. This is support that continues to ensure that Andover is a place where people want to live, to 
work, and to raise a family. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Dr. Claudia L. Bach 
Superintendent of Schools 



99 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution serving 
1462 students from the communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover. The 
school's staff of nearly 200 includes 22 educators who live in Andover, including teachers, 
paraprofessionals and members of the leadership team. 

There was a dramatic increase from 2005-06 to 2006-07 in the number of students 
enrolled from Andover and applications for next Fall are higher than at this time a year ago. 

GLTS is fully accredited by the New England Association of Schools & Colleges 
(NEASC). About 30% of the school's graduates go directly to college following graduation, 
while a significant number of the remaining students combine a full-time career with college 
classes. 

The school restructured to a five-academy model several years ago, with the Freshman 
Academy and four career clusters or academies that create smaller learning environments for 
students and encourage integrated career and academic projects. 

Career academies include Advanced Science & Technology, with majors in Allied Health, 
Biotechnology, Electronics, Machine Technology, and Information Support Services; Business 
Communications, with majors in Fashion Design, Graphic Communications, Marketing and 
Office Technology; Construction, with majors in Carpentry, Electrical, Metal Fabrication, and 
Plumbing; and Service, with majors in Autobody, Automotive, Cosmetology, and Culinary Arts 
& Hospitality. 

Greater Lawrence offers a full academic program as well as career education in seventeen 
vocational-technical areas. Students and staff enjoy the rotating or "week about" schedule in 
which students spend one week in academic classes and the alternate week in their chosen career 
area. 

Some of the accomplishments and milestones of 2006 include: 

National gold medals in Community Service at SkillsUSA in Kansas City in June for 
a project that benefited the Lazarus House shelter in Lawrence, a months-long effort 
that involved students from all 17 career areas. The school's 3-person presentation 
team took a gold medal in Massachusetts and came in first in the country among 53 
competing projects. 

Drama Club presentation in December of "Romeo & Juliet: Straight Out Da Hood," 
written and produced by two GLTS English teachers who are working on their second 
play for an enthusiastic and growing club. 

Great sports achievements in 2006, including the State vocational championship and 
State quarter-final qualification by girls basketball, the fourth Commonwealth 
Athletic Conference title by indoor track, a fifth-year-straight conference title by the 



100 



wrestling team, and the first win in 20 years in a State playoff game by the varsity 
softball team. 

Participation in the University of Massachusetts Lowell Assistive Technology Design 
Fair in April. Under the tutelage of their physics teacher, twenty-three students 
created such items as a paper folding machine for a woman with cerebral palsy, a 
boosting chair for a client with lupus, and a doorbell system for a deaf person. 

The Automotive Technology program was recertified by NATEF. 

Greater Lawrence Tech students won the Culinary Knowledge Bowl for the first time. 

Achievement in career areas, as more students competed and placed in DECA and 
SkillsUSA district and state competitions. GLTS had its first SkillsUSA state 
qualifier in Cabinetmaking. 

A second successful Tech Prep Week resulted in more students exploring both 
college and career options after high school and 100 more registering for this national 
program that gives students college credit for work completed at GLTS. 

A new administration was welcomed in August of 2006. Superintendent-Director Dr. 
Judy Ann DeLucia and her staff have implemented a number of positive changes including a 
new security system to enhance a safe environment for students and staff, construction of a 
tutoring center for students to help them build academic skills for success in MCAS and the 
extension of tutoring services to all freshmen and sophomores. GLTS and Andover are 
discussing a partnership for the Fall of 2007 that would pilot after-school programs for Andover 
middle school students. 

"A Community of Learners Dedicated to Service and Excellence" is the school's motto. 
The School believes that community service is an important part of being a good citizen; in 
technical education, rendering service can provide mutual benefits. Each year the member 
communities and nonprofit organizations within the Greater Lawrence area submit requests for 
consideration. Requests can be for services or projects that will have educational value for the 
students who complete them. The following projects for Andover organizations were completed 
during 2006: 

Andover Community Trust House Project 

Andover Chamber of Commerce "Taste of Andover" participant 

Pike School Pre-K Program in the Bakery 

Wood Hill Middle School PTA Teacher Appreciation Luncheon 

Senior Citizens Center Activities with Cosmetology and Culinary Arts 

Andover Education Improvement Association: 30 white boards for classrooms 

Printing services including programs, yearbooks, invitations and phone directories by 

the Graphic Communications career area for New England Singers, South Elementary 

School, West Middle School, Shed Kids Club, High Plain Elementary School, 

Andover Chamber of Commerce, Andover Troop 828 and Andover ABC. 



101 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

The mission of the Andover Commission on Disability is to address Andover's needs for 
the Town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. 

The Andover Commission on Disability is a commission of nine volunteers serving three- 
year terms and appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability-related issues. 
The majority of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to disability. The 
goals of the Commission are as follows: 

To advocate for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in the Town 

of Andover. 

To research the needs and problems of people with disabilities in the Town of Andover. 

To advise and assist Town officials and employees in addressing the needs of people with 

disabilities. 

To provide information, referral, guidance and technical assistance to individuals, public 

agencies, business and organizations in matters pertaining to disability. 

To participate to the maximum extent possible in disability-related programs of a local, 

regional, state and federal nature. 

To support training related to disability to people who reside or work in the Town of 

Andover. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

The Commission's areas of concentration during 2006 were: 

Project Lifesaver 

Access as part of the Main Street Project 

Curb Cut Access 

Penguin Park Playground 

Sponsored School Library Books on Disability 

Handicap Parking Program 

CAM Training 

Emergency Preparedness 

Information Resource 

PROJECT LIEESAVER 

The Commission continues to be actively involved in the Project Lifesaver Program. 
There are now six participants in the program - 4 children, 2 adults and their families. As the 
sponsor of the program, the Commission has a sub-committee working with the Andover Police 
Department to maintain its commitment to the program. The Commission's current focus is 
outreach into the community by presenting this unique, lifesaving tool to local service groups as 
well as educational, medical and professional members of the Andover public. The Commission 
will continue to be available to the community and share its first-hand knowledge and experience 
with neighboring communities. 



102 



ACCESS PROJECT - MAIN STREET PROJECT 

In anticipation of the Main Street Project, the Commission's sub-committee on Access 
has conducted a study of the accessibility of entrances and passage in businesses with a Main 
Street address. Over a year's time, and with the consent from business owners, site visits were 
completed at thirty-six buildings which house 198 businesses open to the public. After each site 
visit, a follow-up letter was sent to both the business and property owners informing them of the 
sub-committee's observations. Once the business and/or location met all ADA (Americans with 
Disabilities Act of 1990) requirements, a window decal was given stating that the business was 
in full compliance and approved by the Andover Commission on Disability as disability-friendly. 
If the facility was not in compliance with ADA specifications, each point of non-compliance was 
outlined with reference given to the federal and state laws on disability access. Corrections are 
the responsibility of both the property and business owners. Further follow-up to these 
businesses, particularly during the Main Street renovations, will be made so that all citizens and 
visitors to Andover can benefit from the improvements made to Main Street. Compilation of the 
statistical data will be presented to the Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and general public. 

ACCESS PROJECT - CURB CUTS 

Each year, the Commission identifies curb cut priorities based on the requirements of the 
ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) which are then presented to the Department of 
Public Works. In 2006, focus was on completing the curb cuts on and near Main Street that are 
required but will not be part of the Main Street Project funding. The Department of Public 
Works has completed all the curb cut work that was requested. The Commission is now 
planning next year's curb cuts priorities which is always accompanied by photographic 
documentation. The Commission reviewed all public gathering places, churches and schools that 
should be accessible and submitted a map and pictorial report for updating in the Spring and 
Summer construction schedule. 

PENGUIN PARK PLAYGROUND 

Boy Scout Troop 76 completed a valuable volunteer disability-related in 2006. Penguin 
Park was chosen to be the focus of their community service project and now has an accessible 
pathway made with crushed stone. The new and improved pathway allows kids and adults in 
wheelchairs as well as parents with baby carriages and strollers to easily access the park. The 
project was a combined effort of the Plant and Facilities Department, the Disability Commission 
and most importantly, the Boy Scouts. 

SPONSORED SCHOOL LIBRARY BOOKS ON DISABILITY 

In keeping with its mission to create an awareness of all disabilities, the Commission was 
pleased to provide the necessary funding to purchase books dealing with the subject of 
disabilities. The books were placed in all of Andover's public schools. The School 
Department's media specialists worked collaboratively to ensure that the Town would have a 
variety of books on different subjects. Media specialists from The Pike School and St. 
Augustine's School, while not provided with funds, also ensured that their media centers 



103 



had books dealing with perspectives on disabilities. Individual schools purchased between 16 
and 20 books. Many of the books deal with individual subjects and others were purchased to be 
used as reference by both teachers and other professional that interact with the Town's school- 
age children. 

HANDICAP PARKING PROGRAM 

For several years, designated members of the Commission have been trained and 
authorized to ticket vehicles illegally parked in the Town's handicap parking spaces. In 
collaboration with the Police Department, such parking violations are documented, photographed 
for the Police Department and then citations are issued in the amount of $100. 

CAM TRAINING 

The Commission once again attended a two-day training program on Community Access 
Monitoring. New members of the Commission joined their counterparts as certified CAM 
monitors who are registered with the Massachusetts Office on Disability for assignments in the 
local area. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 

In collaboration with State initiatives, the State Department of Health and the Homeland 
Security Program, Commission members attended various emergency preparedness programs 
locally, regionally and at the state level. The Commission will be working closely with the 
Board of Health and regional emergency personnel to revise and implement disaster plans. Its 
focus is on the needs of the disabled during and after evacuations from either natural or man- 
made disasters. This effort is part of its mission statement and a high priority for the coming 
year. 

INFORMATION RESOURCE 

The Commission publishes a newsletter in their continuous effort to educate the public 
and report on its activities throughout the Town. The newsletter is available at various locations 
including the Town Offices, the Senior Center, Old Town Hall, Memorial Hall Library, the 
Public Safety Center and the Commission's website. 

The Commission's website can be reached at http://andoverma.20v/boards/disabiIitv . 
It is intended to inform residents of new programs and services for the disabled as well as areas 
of concern needing advocacy. 



104 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in 
the following areas 

DEMOLITION DELAY BYLAW 

The Commission heard demolition requests for five properties and imposed delays of to 
12 months. Two historically significant building will be demolished after the delay periods end. 
One proposal was withdrawn. Two structures were determined to be not historically significant 
and were demolished. Fifteen applications were reviewed for historic appropriateness. 

DIMENSIONAL SPECIAL PERMIT/HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

Two requests were submitted - one was approved and one was withdrawn. 

LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS 

The Preservation Commission and Ballardvale Historic District Commission work 
cooperatively on issues of mutual interest. Member Lynn Smiledge represents the Preservation 
Commission on the BVHDC. 

WEST PARISH GARDEN CEMETERY COMMITTEE 

Commission member James Batchelder reported the development of a website to promote 
the cemetery and chapel. He offers guided tours of this historic cemetery and landmark 1909 
Chapel each October. (See www. wcstparishgardenccmetery.org for further information). 

HERITAGE EDUCATION 

The 16 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held in May at the Memorial Hall 
Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and Ballardvale Historic District 
Commission to recognize outstanding examples of historic preservation in the community. Ten 
property owners and one individual received recognition for their efforts. 

PROJECTS OF NOTE 

Historic Building Survey Project 

Commission Member Lynn Smiledge is directing the first phase of a project to update and 
add to the Andover Historic Building Survey, a collaborative effort of the Preservation 
Commission, the Andover Historical Society and Memorial Hall Library. The goal is to 
digitize the general survey of Andover's historic buildings from the late 17th century through 
the early 20th century. Dean Baumeister, Memorial Hall Library Systems Coordinator, has 
created the searchable database that can be sorted by category or modified as new information 
becomes available. Upon completion, the web site, hosted by Memorial Hall Library, will 
provide researchers and Town departments with internet access to this information. 

105 



Design Review Task Force 

The Commission remains vitally interested in the downtown, its historic buildings and 
character. In 2006, Commission Chair Karen Herman chaired the newly-appointed Design 
Review Task Force which consisted of members from the business community, an architect, 
a Design Advisory Group member, a professional engineer, Margaret Salafia representing the 
Preservation Commission and Town Planning staff to study and recommend design review 
standards for the downtown. The DRTF will recommend an article for the 2007 Annual 
Town Meeting to improve the existing design review bylaw. The Committee also developed 
a set of design review standards as a tool for use by applicants and the Design Advisory 
Group. Member Lynn Smiledge is the Commission's representative on the Design Advisory 
Group. 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
community character. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of the 
Dimensional Special Permit for Historic Preservation. Two preservation restrictions were 
approved this year. The Commission also encourages individual homeowners to consider 
preservation restrictions or easements for the long term protection of their historic properties. 

Acting in its advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources assist individual building owners in understanding 
the meaning of historic preservation, instructs them on the selection of appropriate materials 
and directs them to appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. As always, the 
Commission is willing to advise building owners on their historic preservation projects. 



106 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



2004 2005 2006 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of animals testing positive for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of dogs quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of horses 

Number of donkeys 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 1, 2006 at the Andover 
Animal Hospital on Lowell Street. Sixty-seven animals were vaccinated for Rabies. 



21 


24 


20 


5 


10 


14 











63 


52 


54 


28 


3 


16 


19 


17 


17 


14 


4 


2 


20 


6 


3 


3 


3 


3 


73 


64 


76 


4 


4 


4 








3 


1 


4 


3 


65 


85 


90 


2 


1 


1 



107 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During 2006, the Trustees acted on thirteen cases, disbursing S20,266.67 on approved cases 
(which numbered thirteen) and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is 
available. The principal of 5345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income are invested 
under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon 
vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 3 1 , 2005 $ 1 04,726.97 

Receipts - 2006 17,824.99 

$122,551.96 
Disbursements - 2006 20,266.67 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2005 $102,285.29 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved three applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/05 $51,81 7.54 

Income - FY-2006 1,866.18 

Expenditures - FY-2006 1,800.00 

Balance as of 6/30/06 $51,883.72 



108 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. The Monthly Meetings are 
held on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room located at 100 
Morton Street except during the months of January, May and October when meetings are held at the 
Frye Circle Community Room, 256 North Main Street. The Housing Authority Board members and 
Director are as follows: 

James Cuticchia - Chairman Calvin Deyermond - Vice Chairman & State Appointee 

Janice Burkholder Daniel T. Grams - Assistant Treasurer 

Francis O'Connor - Treasurer Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Executive Director 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of State-aided housing for 
elder/disabled people on Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court and 56 
units of family housing on Memorial Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. 
Chapter 689 program and administers ten Alternative Housing Vouchers (AHVP) for a total of 292 
State-aided units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits 

1 person -$41,700 3 people - $53,650 5 people- $64,350 7 people - $73,900 

2 people - $47,700 4 people - $59,600 6 people- $69,150 8 people - $78,650 

Apartment Turnover: 34 Elder/Disabled Units ( 1 6%) 1 1 Family Units (20%) 

Average Rent: $296 - Elder/Disabled Program $369 - Family Program (includes utilities) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 

Stowe Court - Sprinkler System Installation completed - $289,774 
Stowe Court Roof Replacement completed - $62,000 
Grandview Terrace - Water Re-mediation - $86,000 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons for Youth Program 

An after school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the Andover 
Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance Program. 

State/ AH A Rent Escrow Program 

Allows Memorial Circle tenants to escrow partial rent payments, specifically, to transition out of 

public housing. Two tenants remain in the program. 

Federally- funded Programs 

The AHA administers 127 vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Program through 
HUD. Section 8 income limits are as follows: 

1 person -$ 27,350 3 people - $35,200 5 People - $42,250 7 People - $48,500 

2 people -$31,300 4 people- $39,100 6 People- $45,350 8 People- $51,800 



Family Self Sufficiency Program 



my oeu aumciency rrugram 

Currently 9 participants with 5 escrowing partial rent payments monthly. 



109 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF: December 31, 2006 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

Money Market Fund 

STOCKS & BONDS 

500 000 Shs. Atmos Energy Corp. 

300 000 Shs. Diebold, Inc 

300 000 Shs General Electric 

300.000 Shs. Honeywell Intl. Inc. 

300 000 Shs. Keyspan Corp 

200 000 Shs Kimberly Clark Corp. 

300 000 Shs Meadwestvaco Corp. 

200.000 Shs NY Times Co A 

300 000 Shs National City Corp 

800 000 Shs Pelrohawk Energy Corp 

300 000 Shs Pioneer Nat Res Co. 

300 000 Shs Raytheon Co New 

400 000 Shs Southern Co 

500.000 Shs Todco CI A 

300 000 Shs Unilever PLC 

400 000 Shs Vectren Corp. 

300 000 Shs Hugoton Royalty Trust UBI 
40000.000 FHLB.4 28%.1 1/05/07, Callable 5/05/06 

TOTAL STOCKS & BONOS 



TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 
Reserve for Lower of Cost /Market 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknorth 

TOTAL FUNDS 







Market Value 


Book 


Market 


Over/(Under) 


Value 


Value 


Book Value 




31-0ec-2006 
$25,24027 


31-Dec-2006 
$0 00 


$25,240.27 


$10,529 50 


$15.955 00 


$5,425.50 


$11,050.26 


$13,980 00 


$2.92974 


$10.02481 


$11,163 00 


$1,138.19 


$10.673 98 


$13,572.00 


$2.898 02 


$11.164 35 


$12,354.00 


$1,189.65 


$11.696 03 


$13,590 00 


$1.893 97 


$9.80524 


$9,018.00 


-$787.24 


$5.65513 


$4,872.00 


-$783 13 


$10.55235 


$10.968 00 


$41565 


$10,436.25 


$9.200 00 


-$1,236 25 


$9,898 25 


$11.907 00 


$2,008.75 


$9.446 23 


$15.840 00 


$6,393.77 


$12.047 25 


$14.744 00 


$2.696 75 


$9,269 80 


$17.085 00 


$7,815.20 


$11,631 94 


$15,022 80 . 


$3,390 86 


$9.91228 


$11,312.00 


$1,399.72 


$8,009.59 


$7,380 00 


-$629 59 


$40.000 00 


$39,687 60 


-$31240 


$211.803 24 


$247.650 40 


$35,847 16 


$237,043.51 


$272,890.67 


$35,847.16 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$237.04351 


$272,890 67 


$35,847 16 


========= 


- 




$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 



$0 00 



$0 00 



$0 00 



Capital Fund Market value as of 12/31/05 
Change in Market Value from 12/31/05 





$258 39 


$258 39 


$0 00 




$237,301.90 


$273,149.06 


$35,847.16 


$258,068.08 




$15,080.98 





110 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - December 31, 2006 

PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2006 

LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



4/19/2006 


Sold 


500 Shs Pepco Holdings Inc 


5/1/2006 


Sold 


250 Shs Peoples Energy Corp 


6/20/2006 


Sold 


300 Shs Tribune Co New 


9/5/2006 


Sold 


1 Sh Hanesbrand Inc 


9/22/2006 


Sold 


62 Shs Hanesbrand Inc 


11/3/2006 


Sold 


200 Shs Verizon Communications 


12/7/2006 


Sold 


500 Shs Sara Lee Corp 
TOTAL Sold 


ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



2/13/2006 Bought 300 Shs Tribune Co. New 

2/21/2006 Bought 200 Shs N Y TimesCo. A 

4/21/2006 Bought 800 Shs Petrohawk Energy Corp 

5/22/2006 Bought 300 Shs Hugoton Royalty Trust UBI 

8/1 5/2006 Bought 300 Shs General Electric 

TOTAL Acquired 

BOOrv VALUE - iU ,12006 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2006 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 

None 

TOTAL Sold/Matured 
ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 
None 

TOTAL Acquired 
BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 





$179,369.99 




$11,321.75 


$10,050.03 


$1,271.72 


$9,042.82 


$10,937.75 


-$1,894.93 


$9,459.61 


$9,292.88 


$166.73 


$10.50 


$13.00 


-$2.50 


$1,298.36 


$1,635.25 


-$336.89 


$7,306.62 


$9,714.50 


-$2,407.88 


$8,408.83 


$9,342.00 


-$933.17 



$46848.49 $50,985.41 



$9,292.88 
$5,655.13 

$10,436.25 
$8,009.59 

$10,024.81 

$43,418.66 
$171,tfG&24 

BONDS/NOTES 



$40,000.00 



0.00 



$0.00 



0.00 $0.00 
$40,000.00 



-$4,136.92 



$0.00 



$0.00 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve and Principal Funds- 12/31/2006 
TDBN Checking account 12/31/2006 



Total 
$211,803.24 Gain/(Loss) 

-$4,136.92 
$0.00 

$211,803.24 

$25,240.27 
$258.39 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 12/31/2006 



$237,301.90 



111 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Capital Account 
DETAILS OF MISC. OPERATING EXPENSES 

TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2006 





1-Jan-06 


1-Jan-2005 






thru 


thru 






31-Dec-2006 


31-Dec-2005 


Variance 


Copying/Printing Costs 


$18.09 


$31.11 


-$13.02 


Postage 


$0.00 


$21.40 


-$21.40 


Office Supplies 


$0.00 


$20.98 


-$20.98 


Other expenses 


$172.20 


$0.00 


$172.20 


Fidelity Insurance 


$0.00 


$100.00 


-$100.00 


Treasurer's Honorarium 


$600.00 


$600.00 


$0.00 



Total 



$790.29 



$773.49 



$16.80 



112 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 



STATEMENT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED: December 31, 2006 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 









Apportioned 














Misc 


Income 




Less 




Scholarships 




Beginning 


Additions 


1^lul-2005 




2005-2006 


Ending 


Awarded 




BALANCE 


to 


thnj 


BALANCE 


Scholarship 


BALANCE 


after 




1-Jan-2006 


Pnnapal 


30-Jun-2006 


30-Jun-2006 


Awards 

$0 00 


30-Jun-2006 


l-Jul-06 


H.W&M P.BARNARD 


$1,133.01 


$0 00 


$82.57 


$1,21558 


$1.21558 




J W.BARNARD 


$7.94128 


$0.00 


$578.75 


8.520.03 


100.00 • 


8.420.03 




ALICE M.BELL 


$1,192 14 


$0.00 


$86 88 


1,279.02 


0.00 • 


1.279.02 




THOMAS BLACK 


$15.67292 


$0 00 


$1.142 22 


16,815.14 


500 00 


16,315.14 


$1,000.00 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


$2.69170 


$0 00 


$19617 


2.887.87 


30.00 * 


2,857.87 




FRED W DOYLE 


$10.603 17 


$0 00 


$77275 


11,375.92 


0.00 


11,375.92 


$1,000.00 


WARREN F DRAPER 


$1,754 11 


$0 00 


$127 84 


1.881 95 


1000 • 


1.871.95 




WILLIAM G GOLDSMITH 


$3,025 95 


$0 00 


$22053 


3.246 48 


000 


3.246 48 




ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


$1.23271 


$0 00 


$89 84 


1.322 55 


1000 * 


1.312.55 




MYRON E.GLTrTERSON 


$1.664 68 


$0 00 


$121.32 


1.786 00 


000 


1,786 00 




ANDOVER GRANGE 


$3,01141 


$0 00 


$219 47 


3,230.88 


50.00 • 


3.180 88 




NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 


$20.07929' 


$0 00 


$1.463 36 


21.542.65 


500.00 


21.042.65 


$1,000.00 


MAKGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 


$31,292 88 


$0 00 


$2.280 59 


33,57347 


000 


33,573.47 


$1,000.00 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


$11.11251 


$0 00 


$809 87 


11.922.38 


300.00 * 


11,622.38 


$500 00 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 


$28,032 52 


$0 00 


$2.04298 


30,075.50 


00 


30.075.50 


$1,000.00 


HENRY WYATT 


$13.002 58 


$989 00 (A 


$1.01969 


15,01127 


500.00 (B 


16.151.27 


$500.00 


A.F.B. &W.A. TROW 


$91.884 63 


$0 00 


9.48821 


101.372.84 


8.000 00 


93.372.84 


$8.000 00 


RES FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 


$0 00 


$0 00 


000 


0.00 


00 (C 


3,12517 






$245.327 49 


$989 00 


$20.743 03 


$267,059.52 


$10,000.00 


$261,824.69 


$14.000 00 



(A — Add'l funds contnbuted by Town Employees- 7/05 
(B - plus SI 640 00 from Summer 2006 golf tournament) 
(C- plus S312S.17 income OUul06-31Dec06 held as Reserve) 
' - Funds' combined to add up to $500 Given as one scholarship 

SUMMARY-INCOMEr(EXPENSE) as of 30Jun2006. the end of the School/Town iscal year 



Interest Income - Broker MM 
Dividend Income - Secuntles/MF 
Capital Gam Distributions - MF 
Gam. (Loss! on Sale of Securities 



Interest Inc Broker MM - Trow 
Div Inc MF - Trow 
Caprtal Gain D.stnb - Trow 
Maintenance Pee 



$270 65 
$4.835 95 
$3,275.87 
$2.872 35 



Total Broker Sec/MF Income 



Total - Trow Fund Income 
Total Income 30Jun2Q06 



Expenses 

2005-2006 Schol Awards 



Net Income 30Jun2006 



$1 1.254 82 (gets apportioned to the other funds) 

$22522 
$3,505 39 
$5,770.10 

■312 :o 



$9.488 21 (adds directly to Trow pnnapal) 
$20,743.03 

$10.000 00 



$10,743.03 



TD BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT 

FEDERATED CAPITAL RES MONEY MARKET FUND 

2.578 907 Shs AMERICAN BALANCED FUND 

885.319 Shs CAPITAL INCOME BUILDER FUND 

14.529 012 Shs FRANKUN INCOME FUND 

1.203 435 Shs TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 

Total - Individual Scholarship Funds 

FED. CAP RES MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 
1.011.476 Shs. PIONEER EQUrTY INCOME/TROW FUND 
517.003 Shs PIONEER SMALL CAP/TROW FUND 
4,900.601 Shs. PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND 

Total - Trow Scholarship Funds 
RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

Total value of funds held 



FUNDS HELD (31Dec2006) 



Market Value (MV) 
31-Dec-2006 



$0 00 
$14,91642 
$49,050.81 
$54,101 84 
$38,647 17 
$30.146 05 
$186.86229 

$11.855 22 
$32.144 71 
$16.64233 
$53.02450 
$113.466 76 
$0 00 

$300,329.05 



Book Value (BV) 



$0 00 
$14,916.42 
$47,329.79 
$46.52350 
$36.100 00 
$22,509.73 
$167,37944 

$11,655.22 
$27,068.18 
$10,721.85 
$45.000 00 
$94,445.25 
$0.00 

$261,824.69 



$0 00 
$0.00 
$1,721.02 
$7,57834 
$2,547,17 
$7,636.32 
$19.482 85 

$0.00 
$5.076 53 
$5.92048 
$8.024 50 
$19,021 51 

$0 00 

$38.504 36 



112.1 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - December 31, 2006 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2006 

LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 

TOTAL Sold 
ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



TOTAL Acquired 
BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 
235,253.05 

0.00 

0.00 
235,253.05 



BONDS/NOTES 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2006 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 
ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 



TOTAL Acquired 
BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2006 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve Funds and Checking Account - 12/31/2006 
Federated Capital Reserve MM Account - TROW -12/31/2006 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 
0.00 

Total 

235,253.05 Gain/(Loss) 

0.00 

0.00 

235,253.05 

14,916.42 
11,655.22 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 12/31/2006 



261,824.69 



112.2 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER. MASSCHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

June 30, 2006 

Governmental Fund Type Proprietary Fund Type 

General Water Sewer Capital Special 
Fund Enterpnse Enterprise Projects Revenue 






Revenues: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Other Excise 

Penalties and Interest on Taxes and Excises 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Fees 

Charges (or Services - Water 

Charges for Services - Sewer 

Departmental Revenue - School 

Departmental Revenue - Library 

Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 

Other Departmental Revenue 

Licenses and Permits 

Special Assessments 

Fines and Forfeits 

Investment Income 

Other 

Intergovernmental 

Real Properly Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Tax Titles 

NESWIC One Time Revenue 

Special Revenue/Grant Revenue 
Offset Receipts 

DCS 

Elder Services 

Rentals 

Off Duty Admin Fee 

Cemetery Internment Fees 

Ambulance Fees 

Medicare 

Bond Premiums 

Total Revenues 



Fiduciary 
Internal Expendable 

Service Trust 



5.000.633 15 

713.732 00 

279.899 98 

2.016.00 

65.96935 

000 

0.00 

24.763 40 

19.304 40 

000 

285.82057 

1.785.481 58 

1.037 40 

451.046 60 

870.581 28 

000 

9.740.755 31 

83.590.315 13 

1.509.478 02 

87.499 34 

3.610.286 93 

000 

524.575 04 
183.77508 
69.78365 
73.70500 
56,810 00 
802.615 75 
410.437 62 



6.510.53862 



3.425.377 11 



(8.547 42) 



23.360.00 



3.364.54823 



1.558 62 1.405.439 53 



144.047 76 



13.040 09 



77.917.00 



39.524.47 127.31636 

9.682,000.00 



3.846.000 00 



10.062.982 59 



Total 

(Memorandum 

Only) 



5.000,633.15 

713,732.00 

279,899.98 

2.016.00 

65.96935 

6.510.538.62 

3.425.377 11 

24.76340 

19.304 40 

23,360 00 

3.649,253 44 

1,785.481.58 

1,408.035.55 

451.046 60 

1.194,509 96 

9.682,000 00 

13.664.67231 

83.590,315.13 

1.509,478.02 

87,499 34 

3.610.286 93 

10,062.98259 

524.57504 

183.77508 

69.783.65 

73.70500 

56,810.00 

802.615.75 

410.437.62 



00 


29.469 06 


122.191 71 










151.660.77 


110 165.322 58 


6.693.046 IS 


5,035.416 02 


3.846.000.00 


10,062.982 59 


13.086.072 70 


150.676 36 


149.034.518.37 



Expenditures 

General Government 

Community Development 

Community Service 

Elder Services 

Municipal Maintenance 

Public Safety 

Water Entepnses 

Sewer Enterprise 

Public Works 

Library 

School 

Fixed 

Insurance 

Debt Service 

Retirement 

State & County Assessments 

Special Revenue/Grant Expenditures 

Total Expenditures 



3.206.538 70 

1.406.89146 

938.103 62 

696.239 66 

4.124.375 93 

12.162.467 08 

000 

00 

4.996.696 09 

2.424.857 65 

51.781.39145 

500.000 00 

10.341.326 41 

12.091.880 53 

3.961.248 00 

1.983.594 77 



3.559.30074 



1.737.857 38 



1.153.15315 
1.574.168.89 



744.031 76 
376.744 74 



6.082.367 36 

36.735 84 

2.682.32479 



47,31033 



13.249.317 95 



4,407 

2,981 

938 

696 

4.868 

12.539 
3.559 
1,737 

11,079 
2,461 

54,463 
500 

23,590 

12,091 
3,961 
1,983 



002.18 
060 35 
103.62 
23966 
407 69 
211 82 
30074 
,857 38 
06345 
,593.49 
.71624 
,000 00 
.644 36 
.880 53 
.248.00 
.594.77 



00 








9,954.056 60 






9,954,056 60 


110.615.611 35 


3 559.300 74 


1,737.85^ 36 


12,649,52653 


9,554 056 60 


13,249,317 55 


47.310.33 


151,812.980.88 



Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Long Term Debt Proceeds 12/09/2005 
Water Pollution Abatement Trust 
Operating Transfers 
Other Financing Sources(Uses) 

Total Sources (Uses) 



3.396.225 22 (3.403.367,00) (2.671.651.00) 
(10.936.88) 



5.300.000 00 

823.01832 

2.684,000 00 



(10.000 00) 
500.000.00 



3.385.28834 (3.403.367 00) (2,671,651.00) 8,807.018.32 



4.79278 



000 490,000.00 



5.300,000.00 

823.018.32 

(0.00) 

489,063.12 



6,612,081.44 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 

Fund Balance July 1, 2005 

Fund Balance June 30, 2006 



2.929.99957 (269.62162) 625.909 64 3.491.79 113.718.77 

6.178.277.48 3.499.740.75 (63.918.21) (4,864.241.19) 3.747,401,34 



(163.245.25) 593.366.03 

1,069.128.72 3.391,82954 



9.108,277 05 3.230.119.13 561.991.43 (4.860.749 40) 



3.861.120,11 



905.88347 3.985,195,57 



3,833.618,93 
12.958.218.43 



16,791.837.36 



114 



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115 



Town of Andover 

General Fund Special Articles 

June 30 , 2006 



ARTICLE 
NUMBER 



ANNUAL 
ART 69 1999 
ANNUAL 



ARTICLE 
TITLE 



UNPAID BIUS 
OPPOSE GAS PLANT 
FIREWORKS FUND 



ASSESSORS REASSESSMENT 



WETLAND BYLAW 



CONTINUED 


OTHER 


APPROPRIATION 


ACCOUNTS 


000 




7866 




9 186 62 





APPROPRIATION 



TRANS 


EXPENDED 


ENCUMB 


CONTINUED 


FROM 






APPROPRIATION 


OTHER 






000 




7866 




000 




9.186 62 




9,000 00 



9.26528 


00 


9,000 00 


00 


9.265.28 


00 


9.000 00 


25.275 00 








22.275 00 




3.000 00 


25.275 00 


000 


00 


000 


22.275 00 


00 


3,000 00 


1 461 19 












1.461 19 



ART 44 1987 
ART 65-4, 199f 
ART 98. 1999 



ELM SQ TRAFFIC SIGNAL 
TRAFFIC SIGNALS 
BALLARDVALE SIGN 



ART 43. 1996 DISPATCH CENTER 



5.313 08 
1.599 10 
4 000 00 



5.313 08 
1.599 10 
4.000 00 



10.912 18 


000 


000 


00 


00 


00 


10.912 18 


857 80 












857 80 



ART 48 1997 
ART 49. 1997 



ART 31.1999 
ART 21. 2000 
ART 22. 2000 
ART 16.2002 
ART 39. 2005 



RIVER ROAD LAND 
BURTT ROAD 



SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 
SENIOR TAX VOUCHER 
ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 
ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 
ELDERLY DISABLED TRANSPORT 



5.000 00 
100 00 



ART 45. 1992 WAR MEMORIAL 



TOTAL GENERAL FUND 



4,000 00 

2 000 00 

191 50 

14.867 16 

000 







5.000 00 






100 00 


00 


00 


5, 100 00 

4.000 00 

2.000 00 

191.50 


13.413 66 


1.453.50 


000 




12.000 00 


00 



21 058 66 
1.034 63 


000 


12.000 00 


000 


13 413 66 


13.453 50 


6.191 50 
1.034 63 


1.034 63 


000 




000 


000 


000 


1.034 63 


74,964 74 


000 


21 000 00 


00 


44,953 94 


13,453 50 


37.557 30 



116 






Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2006 



FUND/TITLE 



BALANCE 
07/01/05 



INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



DEPART- 
MENTAL 



TOTAL 
EXPEND 



OFU 



BALANCE 
30-Jun-06 



ELECTION OT GRANT 

STATE GENERAL GOVERNMENT GRANTS 



2.472 14 



FY03 TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT 
FY03 COMMUNITY POLICING 
REGIONAL EMERG RESPONSE PLAN 
LOCAL PREPAREDNESS GRANT 
ASSISTANCE TO FIREFIGHTERS GRANT 
FIREFIGHTER SAFETY EQUIPMENT 
DISASTER REIMBURSEMENTS 
POLICE ANTENNEA 

AMBULANCE TASK FORCE MOBILIZATION 
HOMELAND SECURITY NIMS TRAINING 
MV YOUTH COURT 
ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING 
STATE PUBLIC SAFETY GRANTS 

PWED 

PWED G-9403 

CHAPTER 90 

STATE PUBLIC WORKS GRANTS 

HEALTHY COMMUNITY 

LAHEY CLINIC NUTRICIAL GRANT 

RECYCLE INCENTIVE 

SERVING PEOPLE WITH DIABILITIES 

MOTHER GOOSE ASKS WHY GRANT 

ARTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 

RIGHT TO KNOW 

NATIONAL LEADERSHIP GRANT 

SECONDHAND SMOKE INITIATIVE 

LIBRARY AID CH 78 SEC 19A 

NEW HORIZONS FOR YOUTH 

FY03 COA FORMULA GRANT 

OTHER STATE GRANTS 

OFF STREET PARKING 

CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS FUND 

SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

WETLAND FILING FEES 

RECEIPTS RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATION 

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY 

SPED ENTLTLEMENT 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION 

SPED IMPROVEMENT 

SPED IMPROVEMENT 

SPED SUIMMER INSTITUTE 

SPED MCAS ALT ASSESSMENT 242 

SPED MCAS ALT ASSESSMENT 242 

CHAPTER 70 

50/50 PROGRAM 

CIRCUIT BREAKER 

DRUG FREE SCHOOLS 

TITLE I READING 

Title VI 

Title V 

TECH LIT\ENHANCED ED 

TECH LITXENHANCED ED 

TITLE 1 

KATRINA ASSISTANCE GRANT 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

PROF DEB TEACHER QUALITY 140 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

AHS WORKFORCE GRANT 

COMPASS GRANT 

CORPORATE GRANTS 

ANDOVER HIGH DONATIONS 



-2.852 11 

-1,862 64 

35.93970 

00 

8.930 00 

6.580 68 

12.900.61 

21.083 06 

0.00 

000 

000 

300 00 



81.019.30 

72.86274 

55.502 81 

-228.93290 



-100,567.35 

13,006 94 

7.666 17 

38.545 46 

1.143 98 

5.124 98 

18.455 42 

97330 

264 36 

1.000.00 

92.309 20 

000 

364 79 



178,854.60 

198.956.20 

5.227 33 

18.87000 

42.327 36 



265.38089 

000 

59.80243 

000 

00 

5.443 19 

00 

000 

24.92 

-52.714 39 

43.596 00 

150.000.00 

0.00 

63.545 63 

0.00 

3.591 22 

0.00 

6.366 00 

0.00 

000 

000 

9.921 17 

00 

52.07 

0.00 

0.00 

40.106.64 

849 03 



16.982 16 
35.116.56 
123.544.00 
12.000 00 
78.366 00 



2.000 00 

21000 

8.876 57 



17,037 69 

13.037.11 

114,551.28 

12.000 00 

87.176.29 

6.580 68 

14.80631 

12.523 70 

00 

21000 

10.875 22 

00 



12.90061 



296,609.82 



693.969 15 



0.00 

2.639 73 



0.00 9.348.52 



288.798.28 

00 

00 

463.92493 



55.921 65 



693.969 15 
85.597 30 



43.639 73 
29.614 00 



164.981 03 



0.00 
970.155 00 



24,411.00 
15.000.00 



1.650.00 
1.470.00 



1.282.325 00 
22.191 00 

8.044 00 

8,414.00 

175,32000 
59.000 00 
90.255 00 



600 00 
10.000.00 



5,033 16 



463,924.93 

86.86348 

00 

12.606 67 

1,14398 

5.21942 

8.558 49 

00 

00 

00 

40.730 88 

94659 

28.628 78 



55,921.65 



5.033.16 

157.941.39 



184.698.29 

00 
000 
00 
0.00 



0.00 

210.934 00 



21.847.08 



0.00 

1.174,45972 

59.802 43 

24.359 41 

14.052.28 

5.443 19 

000 

1.329.82 

00 

00 

00 

1.147,514.21 

22.191 00 

63.54563 

7.251 51 

3.591 22 

6.690 33 

6.36600 

206.34036 

15.330 00 

112.620 52 

9.921.17 

5.400 00 

52.07 

600.00 

10.000 00 

35.83920 

475.00 



216.934 00 



-2.907 64 

20.21681 

44.93242 

000 

119.71 

00 

4.708 22 

13.524.44 

2.000 00 

0.00 

2.384 79 

300 00 



85.278.75 

75.50247 
-418.84 
1.111 32 



76,194.95 

11.740 76 

7,66617 

25.93879 

000 

-94 44 

16.026.93 

973.30 

264 36 

1 .000 00 

95.21805 

4.086 57 

1.35001 



164,170.50 

145.963.59 
5.227 33 
18.87000 
71.856 06 



241.91698 

-204.304 72 

000 

51.59 

947 72 

0.00 

1.650.00 

140 18 

24 92 

-52.71439 

43.596 00 

134,810.79 

000 

0.00 

79249 

00 

1,723.67 

0.00 

-31.020 36 

43.67000 

-22.565.52 

0.00 

-2.700.00 

000 

000 

00 

26.114.52 

374 03 



117 



Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2006 



FUND/TITLE 

ENGINEERING GRANT 

OTHER GIFTS AND GRANTS 

ANDOVERCAR.ES 

AIRS 

COLLINS CTR REVOLVING 

SANBORN GIFTS AND GRANTS 

WEST MIDDLE GIFTS AND GRANTS 

REVOLVING FUNDS EDUCATION 

ATHLETIC REVOLVING 
REVOLVING FUNDS ATHLETIC 



BALANCE 
07/01/05 



INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



00 
23.37922 
2.547 40 
16.80121 
47.53971 



18.487.00 



DEPART- 


TOTAL 


MENTAL 


EXPEND 




5.115.00 


44.62500 


61.583,18 


2.500.00 


1.665 95 


1.449 66 


933.26 


167.320 05 


188.21060 


8.500.00 


4.920 38 


1,450 00 


163 88 



BALANCE 
30-Jun-06 

13.372 00 
6.421.04 
3.381.45 
17.317.61 
26,649 16 
3,579.62 
1.286 12 



420,851.45 


2,690.022.00 


0.00 


0.00 


247,691.79 


3.195,967.32 


150.000.00 


12,597.92 


14.832 32 








352.688 03 


346.603 81 




20.916.54 



346.603.81 



CDP CH44 SEC 53E1/2 

C44 S53 DCS REVOLVING 

CH 44 S53 YOUTH SERVICES 

COA CH44 SEC 53E 1/2 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 LIBRARY AUDIO/VISUAL 

REVOLVING CHAPTER 44 53 E 1/2 



37.235 96 
148.944 43 
56.12048 
57.036 10 
70.750 96 
24.041 29 
13.290 50 



90.691 92 
325.60106 
225.64936 

84.552 78 

23.147 98 
39.287 89 



68.965 02 
271.401.28 
128,784 53 

74,924 08 
000 

21.277 75 

31.257 05 



70.750 96 



58,962 86 
203.14421 
114.285 31 

66,664 80 
000 

25,911 52 

21.321 34 



407.419.72 



788,93099 



596,609.71 



490,290.04 



FRONTAGE ROAD 
DMM FIELDS REVOLVING 
RECYCLABLE BATTERY PROGR 
P&F DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
TOWN DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
PUBLIC SAFETY DAMAGE REST 
PUBLIC WORKS DAMAGE REST 
LIBRARY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
OTHER REVOLVING FUNDS 



3.855 66 
11,798 38 

1.293 84 
18.929 93 
31.428 04 

4.444 25 

9.549 49 
18.310 65 



52.44290 

4.360 00 

250 00 

20.690 43 
7.380 03 



000 

61.275 08 

4000 

51,759 45 

978 36 

0.00 

8.494 17 

7.825 84 



3.855 66 
24.999.55 

1.253 84 
19.613.38 
34.809 68 

4.694.25 
21.74575 
17.864 84 



99.610.24 



159.599 61 



130,372.90 



128,836.95 



EARLY CHILDHOOD REV 
SCHOOL DAMAGE Ch 55 sec 53 1/2 
COMMUNITY ASK REVOLVING 
PARENT TO PARENT REVOLVING 
ANDOVER BUDDY CORPS 
ALL DAY KINDERGARDEN 
EXTRA CURRICULAR REV 
INTRUMENTAL MUSIC REVOLVING 
FINE ARTS 
PHYS ED REVOLV 
LOST BOOKS 

STUDENT TEACHER REVOLVING 
OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES REV 
AND/LAW COLLAB REV. 
TRANSPORTATION REVOLVING 
SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS EDUCATION 

FOOD SERVICES 
SCHOOL LUNCH 

SHED CONTRIBUTIONS 

VETERAN'S SERVICES GIFTS 

CABLE TV COMMUNITY ACCESS 

VETERAN'S WORLD WAR 1 1 MEMORIAL 

GIFT - FIREWORKS 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY GIFT 

OLD TOWN HALL RESTORATION 

TOWN GIFT & DONATIONS 

CONSERVATION GIFT 

CONSERVATION TRAIL ACCOUNT 

DCS-GIFT 

YOUTH SERVICES GIFTS/CONTRIBUTIONS 

DARE CONTRIBUTIONS 

LIBRARY GIFTS & DONATIONS 

HOME FOR THE AGED GIFT 

CHOLESTEROL SCREENING 

A18 2004 ACCUM BENEFITS 

A24. 2005 ACCUM BENEFITS 



33.258 09 
00 

2.252 09 
15.838 41 

1.827 00 

297.186 56 

40.345 46 

12.941 16 

15.024 00 

7.098 74 
41.857 54 

1.040 07 
91.863 76 

1.672 26 
200.193 60 



7.263 81 

2.100 69 

2.514 60 

5 00 

00 

690.474 58 

468 78 

1.308 94 

4.964 14 

234 85 

1.045 68 

43.618 50 

80523 

31.332 68 

68.755.86 

1.317.24 

280.463 30 

300.000 00 



67.963 00 
1.160 00 

11.190 00 

848.471 69 

204.661 47 

12.59500 

55.14658 



90.009 89 

1 .000 00 

462.390 00 



77.10803 

000 

00 

8.271 51 

1.827 00 

834.234 93 

190.157 54 

15.649 40 

54.032 48 

336 62 

11,702 53 

1.04007 

111.421 22 

1,000 00 

329,055 43 



097,833.17 


1.214.209.68 




000 


4500 


5.00 




1.890 63 




0.00 


3.000 00 


813.38 


111.106 76 


000 




00 


17,100 00 


16,24000 




00 




000 


2.830 00 


0.00 


55,72600 


25.24954 




0.00 


18.888 72 


15.96521 




16.99500 




1,146.14 




280,463.30 




24.35371 



24.11306 

1.160.00 

2.252 09 

18.756 90 

0.00 

311.42332 

54.849 39 

9.88676 

16.138 10 

6.762 12 

38.983 50 

00 

70.45243 

1.672 26 

333.528 17 



762.39874 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1.763,416.12 


1,635,836.76 


0.00 


889,978.10 


352.251 12 








1,097.833 17 


1.214.209 68 




235.874 61 



235.874.61 

7.26381 

2.14069 

623 97 

5.00 

2.186 62 

801.581 34 

46878 

2.168 94 

4,964.14 

234 85 

3.87568 

74,094.96 

805.23 

34,256 19 

54,214.83 

171.10 

0.00 

275.64629 



118 



Town of Andover 

Special Revenue/Grants Rollforward 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2006 



A15. 2006 ACCUM BENEFITS 
BALLARDVALE HISTORIC DISTRICT 
POLICE GIFTS AND DONATIONNS 
FIRST TIME HOMEBUYERS 
OTHER SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 



BALANCE 
07/01/05 



INTERGOVTAL INTEREST 



130.72 
00 
00 45.000 00 





DEPART- 


TOTAL 


OFS 


MENTAL 


EXPEND 


400,000 00 




000 
78 50 




5.000.00 


000 
40.000 00 



BALANCE 
30-Jun-06 

400.000 00 

52.22 

5,000 00 

5.000.00 



1,436,804.60 45,000.00 2,453.97 400.000.00 213,696.48 423,200.41 0.00 1,674,754.64 

3,927.974.76 3,890,582.00 5,093.70 400,000.00 4.831,707.96 8.482.694.23 545,207.22 4,027.456.97 



AGENCY ACCOUNTS 

MEALS TAX 

FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 

POLICE OFF DUTY 

FIRE OFF DUTY 

AMBULANCE AGENCY ACCOUNTS 

FIREARMS PERMITS 



0.00 
0.00 
-177.20839 
-2.88669 
0.00 
-0 50 



967.94 

7.108 00 

1.234.300 00 

46.65839 

38.777 10 

7.787 50 



967 94 

7.108 00 

1.213.01661 

49.72824 

43.231 92 

7.787 50 



000 

000 

-155.92500 

-5.956 54 

-4.454 82 

-0 50 



•180,095.58 


000 


0.00 


0.00 


1,335.598.93 


1,321,840.21 


0.00 


-166,336.86 


3.747,879 18 


3.890.582.00 


5,093.70 


400.000.00 


6.167.30689 


9,804,534.44 


545.207.22 


3,861.120.11 



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122 



FUND 

80231 SPRING GROVE 

80251 SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 



80261 EMILINE LINCOLN 
80291 EMMA J LINCOLN 
80301 CONSERVATION FUND 



80141 J GREELEY 

80391 EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 



80001 STABILIZATION 

82031 A & A V LINCOLN 

80201 A J LINCOLN 

80361 ALLEN 

82071 AMERICAN LEGION 

80351 BALLAROVALE MEMORIAL 

80041 CD WOOD 

82081 CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 

82061 CONROY 

80181 DAVID 4 LUCY SHAW 

82011 DRAPER 

80211 El RAYMOND 

80061 ESTATE S P WHITE 

80341 FARRINGTON 

82091 HOLT 

80171 JOHN CORNELL 



80161 MARGARET G TOWLE 
80151 MARGARET G TOWLE 



80071 POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 



BENEFICIARY 



AVIS 
AVIS 
CONSERVATION 



LIBRARY 
LIBRARY 



TOWN 

SPELLING BEE 
NEEDY CHILDREN 
FLOWERS 
HIGH SCHOOL 



SOUTH SCHOOL 



HIGH SCHOOL 



WELFARE/FLOWERS 



SPRING GROVE 



WOOD & COAL 



PRINCIPAL 
INCOME 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

TRUST -CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2006 

BALANCE 

:iPAL July 1. 2005 DEPOSI 



BALANCE 
June 30, 2006 



856,721 05 


23.360 00 




32,058 52 


10,000 00 


902.139 57 


856.721 05 


23.360 00 


00 


32,058 52 


10.000 00 


902.139 57 


35,595 30 






1.298 68 


1.475 00 


35.418 98 





35.595 30 


1,000 00 


1.711 05 




950 42 




56.090 44 




58,751 91 


5,000 00 


6,352 21 


45.000 00 


53,122 43 



62 70 

34 31 

2,043 10 



229 98 
1,938 62 



1.773 75 

984 73 

58,133.54 



6.582 19 
55.061 05 



59.474 64 


00 


00 


2.168 60 


00 


61,643 24 


475,507 61 


500.000 00 




17,569 28 




993,07689 


475.507 61 


500,000 00 


00 


17.569 28 


00 


993.076 89 


7.766 24 






232 29 


6.983 83 


1.014 70 


7.766 24 


00 


00 


232 29 


6.983 83 


1,014 70 


20.212 40 






861 76 




21,074 16 


20,212 40 


00 


00 


861 76 


00 


21.074 16 


267 98 






9 81 


15 00 


262 79 


267 98 


00 


00 


9 81 


15 00 


262 79 


1,108 90 






40 41 




1.149 31 


1,108 90 


00 


00 


40 41 


00 


1.149 31 


1,276 75 






46 56 


25 00 


1.298 31 


1,276 75 


00 


00 


46 56 


25 00 


1.298 31 


1,185,243 66 






43,186 25 




1.228.429 91 


1,185,243 66 


00 


00 


43.186 25 


00 


1.226.429 91 


4,613 66 






168 83 




4,782 49 


4,613 66 


00 


00 


168 83 


00 


4,782 49 


1,503 87 






54 81 




1.558 68 


1,503 87 


00 


00 


54 81 


00 


1.558 68 


41 169 96 






1.500 40 




42,670 36 


41,169 96 


00 


00 


1,500 40 


00 


42.670 36 


14,803 05 






539 28 




15.342 33 


14,803 05 


00 


00 


539 28 


00 


15.342 33 


2,525 09 






92 10 




2,617 19 


2,525 09 


00 


00 


92 10 


00 


2.617 19 


13,781 46 






587 58 




14,369 04 


13,781 46 


00 


00 


587 58 


00 


14,369 04 


171990 






62 70 


15 00 


1 767 60 


1,71990 


00 


00 


62 70 


15 00 


1.767 60 


674 43 






24 54 




698 97 


674 43 


00 


00 


24 54 


00 


698 97 


51,817 54 






1,866 18 


1.800 00 


51.883 72 


51.817 54 


00 


00 


1 .866 1 8 


1.800 00 


51.883 72 


345.825 50 










345,825 50 


104.879 32 






16.073 46 


27,873 09 


93,079 69 


450 704 82 


00 


00 


16.073 46 


27.873 09 


438,905 19 


24626 30 






2.752 66 


7,547 00 


19.831 96 



82051 RAFTON (INTEREST) 
82041 RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 



82021 RICHARDSON 

80331 SMART 

80221 TAYLOR 

80091 TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 

80411 ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 

80191 WL RAYMOND 



INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 

80011 INSURANCE 

80021 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

80031 TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 

HEALTH INSURANCE W/C DEPOSIT 

80371 WORKERS COMPENSATION 

TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 
GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



SCHOLARSHIP 



SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 



3.241 85 






246 19 




3.490 04 


598 50 










598 50 


3.840 35 


00 


00 


248 19 


00 


4,088 54 


5 682 27 






114 22 


1,561 41 


4.235 08 


5,682 27 


00 


00 


114 22 


1.561 41 


4.235.08 


13 436 40 






489 53 


15 00 


13,910 93 


13.436 40 


00 


00 


489 S3 


15 00 


13.91093 


1.785 24 






65 04 




1.850 28 


1.785 24 


00 


00 


65 04 


00 


1,850 28 


7,687 18 






279 82 




7 967 00 


7,687 18 


00 




279 82 


00 


7,967 00 


2,472 00 






1,069 98 




3.541 98 


2,472 00 


00 


00 


1,069 98 


00 


3.541 98 


47,059 58 






1,714 77 




48 774 35 


47,059 58 


00 


ooo 


1 714 77 


00 


48774 35 



3,391.829 54 

219.692 92 
209.721 05 
265.039 34 
292.900 00 

81,77541 



9.597,000 00 
85,000 00 



9.366 79 
6,906 27 
23.249 41 



94,873 53 

12.968.108 42 

107.300 00 

79,036 00 



1,069,128 72 



9 682,000 00 



13,249,317 95 
13 306 628 26 



3,985,195 57 

229.059 71 
121.755 79 
281.728 56 
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TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND OUTSTANDING 

June 30, 2006 (Updated 05/12/2006) 



ARTICLE 



PROJECT NAME 



NEW 
AUTHORIZATION AUTHORIZATIONS 
June 30, 2005 



BONDING AUTHORIZATION 
June 30, 2006 



ART 41, 1999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 

ART 44, 1999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

ART 74, 1999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

ART 12, 2001 LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 

ART 10-1, 2002 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (ADD'L FUNDING) 

ART 1 1 , 2002 NEW SCHOOL ADDITIONAL FUNDING 

ART 12, 2002 WEST ELEMENTARY ASBESTOS REMOVAL 

ART 23, 2002 CONSERVATION FUND 

ART 48, 2002 MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 20, 2003 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 32, 2004 SENIOR CENTER PLANS 

ART 35, 2004 SO MAIN/ROGERS BROOK SEWER 

ART 2A, 2004 SOUTH MAIN AREA SEWERS 

ART 1 1 , 2005 SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATIONS/REPAIRS 

ART 12, 2005 SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY 

ART 33, 2005 MORAINE STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 34, 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 34, 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVE (WPAT) 

ART 41, 2005 FISHBROOK PUMPING STATION 

ART 51 2005 SIDEWALK RECONSTRUCTION 

ART 54 2005 BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION 

ART 17 2006 SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENTS 

ART 33 2006 REPAIR/REPLACEMENT SANITARY SEWER 

ART 37 2006 FIRE PUMPER TRUCK 

ART 43 2006 LANDFILL CAP/LEDGE ROAD 

ART 46 2006 TOWN HVAC REPLACEMENTS 

ART 46 2006 SCHOOL HVAC REPLACEMENTS 



8,500,000.00 

2,200,000.00 

254,000.00 

2,000,000.00 

580,000.00 

350,000.00 

300,000.00 

500.000.00 

269,500.00 

2,472,000.00 

30,000.00 

1,250.000.00 

2.500,000.00 

500,000.00 

235,000.00 

0.00 

1,833,365.00 
4,666,635.00 

300,000.00 

858,000.00 

250,000.00 

1,115,000.00 

500,000.00 

440,000.00 

500,000.00 

250,000.00 
200,000.00 



4,002,000.00 
500,000.00 

1,100,000.00 

200,000.00 
100,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

1,000,000.00 
235.000.00 



858,000.00 
250,000.00 



4,498,000.00 

1,700,000.00 

254,000.00 

900,000.00 

580,000.00 

350,000.00 

100,000.00 

400,000.00 

269,500.00 

1,472,000.00 

30,000.00 

1,250,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

500,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

1,833,365.00 
4,666,635.00 

300,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

1,115,000.00 

500,000.00 

440,000.00 

500,000.00 

250,000.00 
200,000.00 



32,853,500.00 



0.00 9.245,000.00 23,608,500.00 



130 



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131 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1 , 2006 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 6, 2006 the Inhabitants of said Town who 
are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and Nine are to 
vote at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY- EIGHTH DAY OF MARCH, 2006 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have 
notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house and 
in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by publication in 
Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two School 
Committee members for three years, one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years, 
one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School District for three years 
and five Trustees of the Punchard Free School for three years. 

All of the above candidates are to be voted on one ballot. The polls will be open from seven o'clock 
A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of 
Chapter 39, Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to Monday, April 24, 2006, at seven 
o'clock P.M. in the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, then and 
there to begin acting upon articles that follow in this warrant. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 24, 2006 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1393 voters admitted to the meeting. 

James D. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M. 

The opening prayer was giving by Father Christopher Makiej, Sts. Constantine & Helen Church, 71 
Chandler Road. 

Mrs. Katerina Makiej, 7 Aspen Circle, sang the opening song "America the Beautiful". 

Salute to the flag was led by Ted E. Tiechert, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit ninety-eight (98) non-voters to the meeting and 
escort non-voters to the non- voting section thereafter. 



132 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon motion made by Margaret Kruse, President of the League of Women Voters, and duly seconded, 
it was voted by a Majority vote that a time limit of five minutes would be imposed during the 2006 
Town Meeting for presenters and that audience speakers would be limited to three minutes. Speakers 
needing additional time may appeal to the Moderator for more time. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) and no cell 
phones in the Gymnasium. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

The Moderator introduced Mark Merritt, the Town Meeting "Ombudsman", and reminded meeting 
members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to 
articles. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two School 
Committee members for three years, one member if the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical School District for three years, one Andover Housing Committee Member for five years and 
five trustees of Punchard Free School. 

All candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 28, 2006. The Polls were open from 7:00 
A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 



Moderator 

Board of Selectmen 

School Committee 

Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical School 
District 



For One Year 
For Three Years 

For Three Years 

For Three Years 



James D. Doherty 

Brian P. Major 
Ted E. Teichert 

Arthur H. Barber 
Anthony H. James 

Gerald H. Silverman 



Andover Housing Authority For Five Years 

Trustee of Punchard Free School For Three Years 



Daniel T. Grams 

Earl G. Efinger 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Eric Stubenhaus 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Norman C. Frost 



ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

On request of the Town Clerk 
133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority to elect Edward J. Morrissey, 
189A Andover Street, be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years 

Board of Selectman Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise and 
appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the 
Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 
1, 2006 and ending June 30, 2007 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

ARTICLE 4 - 2006 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,169,121 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,170,601 
TOTAL 3,339,722 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,341,885 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 122,750 
TOTAL 1,464,635 

including 6,000 from wetland filing fees 

134 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES/YOUTH 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 695,316 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 278,706 
TOTAL 974,022 
including 517,000 and 52,605 in receipts from Community Services 

and Youth Services programs and activities. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

ELDER SERVICES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 526,614 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 133,772 
TOTAL 660,386 
including 68,000 in federal grants and 42,000 in user fees. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

PLANT & FACILITIES 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,899,795 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 1,296,991 
TOTAL 4,196,786 
including 100,000 in rental receipts, 25,000 from perpetual care 

income and 54,000 from cemetery fees. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

11 PERSONAL SERVICES 11,109,201 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 1,169,761 
TOTAL 12,278,962 

including 144,490 in parking receipts, 60,000 in detail fees, and 
785,000 in ambulance collections. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

PUBLIC WORKS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,518,043 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 3,910,350 
TOTAL 5,428,393 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

SEWER 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 371,979 

16 OTHER EXPENSES 1,668,375 
TOTAL 2,040,354 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

WATER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,722,242 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 2,309,150 
TOTAL 4,031,392 
including 250,000 from Water reserves 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

LIBRARY 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,956,358 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 560,080 
TOTAL 2,516,438 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES: 

21 COMPENSATION FUND 1,037,421 

22 RESERVE FUND 200,000 
TOTAL 1,237,421 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was moved to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT DEPARTMENT 

23 PERSONAL SERVICES 43,113,662 

24 OTHER EXPENSES 11,940,198 
TOTAL 55,053,860 
including 300,000 in Medicaid receipts 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend the School 
Department Budget appropriation to reduce line item 23 Personal Services 
to $42,734,350 and line item 23 Other Expenses to $11,940,198 for a total 
of $54,674,548. 

The amended motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote 



136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 
Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
25 GREATER LAWRENCE ASSESSMENT 
TOTAL 



248,000 
248,000 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote. 



FIXED EXPENSES 

26 DEBT SERVICE 

27 STABILIZATION FUND 

28 GENERAL INSURANCE 

29 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

30 RETIREMENT FUND 

31 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 
TOTAL 



Finance Committee Report: 
Selectmen Report: 
School Committee Report: 



Approval at $54,372,600 
Approval at $54,372,600 
Approval at $55,053,860 





12,741,612 



800,300 



4,111,283 








9,606,000 




27,259,195 


GRAND TOTAL 


120,729,566 


less dedicated Revenues 


(2,404,095) 


NET TOTAL 


$118,325,471 



ARTICLE 4 - 2006 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
SPECIAL ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 



Article 8 



Free Cash FY 2007 



$744,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 

Article 7 FY 2006 School Department - Personal Services 

FY 2006 Health Insurance 

Article 14 Stabilization Fund 

Article 15 Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 

Article 27 Fireworks 

Article 41 Ballardvale Green Improvements 

Article 48 Land Transfer - Buxton Court 



$163,449.00 

$250,000.00 

$500,000.00 

$400,000.00 

$9,000.00 

$25,000.00 

$13,000.00 

TOTAL $1,360,449.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

NONE 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 

Article 17 School Roof Replacements $1,115,000.00 

Article 33 Repair/Replacement Sanitary Sewers $500,000.00 

Article 37 Fire Pumper Truck $440,000.00 

Article 43 Landfill Cap/Ledge Road $500,000.00 

Article 46 Town & School HVAC Replacements $450,000.00 

TOTAL $3,005,000.00 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

Article 32 Transfer of Funds From the Following Warrant Articles: 

Article 18, 1985 - Sewer Mains $303,413.18 

Article 20, 1999 - Sewer Plans - West Andover $3,160.00 

Article 3 1 , 2000 - Bridle Path Sewer Station $1 ,582.40 

Article 13, 2000 - Sewer Mains West Andover $7,148.86 

Article 37, 1 987 - Water Mains $395,390.46 

Article 46, 1992 - Water Mains $289,305.10 

TOTAL $1,000,000.00 
to be appropriated to the following : 

Replacement of Water Meters $1 ,000,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 

Article 13 A Community Development and Planning Department $70,000.00 

Article 13 B Memorial Hall Library -Lost Damaged Materials $20,000.00 

Article 13 C Health Clinic $20,000.00 

Article 13 D Division of Community Services $300,000.00 

Article 13 E Division of Youth Services $225,000.00 

Article 13 F Field Maintenance $80,000.00 

Article 13 G Division of Elder Services $200,000.00 

Article 13 H Public Safety $50,000.00 

Article 131 Memorial Hall Library Audio/Visual $36,000.00 

TOTAL $1,001,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 



138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1. 2006 



Article 5 Capital Projects Fund 

A motion was made and seconded to move the sum of 
$2,245,000 to fund FY 2007 Capital Projects Fund. 
A motion to amend the motion to $1,679,688 was 
moved and seconded and was defeated. 
An amendment to the original motion was made and 
seconded to reduce the School Capital request from 
$379,312 to $633,688 and was ruled out of order by 
Town Counsel. 

A motion was made and seconded to appropriate 
$2,058,135 for FY 2007 Capital Project Fund with the 
intent to hold out $379,000 from School Projects until 
the Town gets additional monies from the State. The 
motion passed by a Majority vote (see minutes for 
the exact motion). 



$2,058,135.00 



Article 16 Elderly & Disabled Transportation Program 



TOTAL 



$12,000.00 
$2,070,135.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER & WATER RESERVES 



Article 31 Transfer funds from Water Reserves 
and appropriate to: 
Water Main Replacements 



$500,000.00 



$500,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM CONSERVATION FUND 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 



NONE 



139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM PARKING RECEIPTS 

Article 47 Pay & Display-Shawsheen Square $69,000.00 

Electric Vehicle for Parking Clerk 
Message Board 

A true record 
ATTEST 



/XfindalC^. fiffliuxrvL^ 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,315,000 
for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2007 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve the sum of $2,245,000 for the purpose 
of funding the Fiscal 2007 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund. 

A motion was made to amend Article 5 to vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$1,679, 688 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2007 appropriation for the Capital Projects 
Fund or take any other action related thereto. 

The Amendment was defeated by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made to amend the main motion to reduce the School Capital requests by $379,312 to 
$633,688. 

The amendment was ruled out of order by Town Counsel, Thomas Urbelis. 

The original motion was WITHDRAWN by the proponent. 

A motion was made and seconded to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,058,135 for the 
purpose of funding the Fiscal 2007 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund and the intent is that the 
$379,000 that we have as a budget gap right now, that we hold out those projects from the School's 
Capital Project request until we get additional monies from the State. 

The motion was approved by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval at $2,058,135 
Selectmen Report: Approval at $2,245,000 

School Committee Report: Approval at $2,315,000 

140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the 
2005 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 6 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 2005 Annual Town Meeting or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that the Town transfer the sum 
of $413,449 from Free Cash and appropriate to the following FY 2006 Budget appropriations: 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES $1 63,449 

HEALTH INSURANCE $250,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash to 
reduce the Fiscal Year 2007 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2006 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that the Town permit the 
Assessors to use $744,000 from Free Cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 2007 tax rate and to affect 
appropriations voted at the 2006 Annual Town Meeting 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash in 
the treasury. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 9 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles or take any other action 
related thereto: 

141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply 
for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to 
Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under any State or Federal 
grant program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with the 
Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the construction 
and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as 
amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for Fiscal 
Year 2006 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 59, Section 5 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of Schools to solicit and 
award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five years, including any renewal, 
extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of 
the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the School Committee, as appropriate, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to accept 
grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the 
Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

G. Granting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to grant 
easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board and the 
Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1. 2006 

On request of the Town Manager 

H. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town Meetings or take 

any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 10A through 10G by a Majority 
vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 10H be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay 
unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 1 1 be WITHDRAWN by a Majority 
vote. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary easements 
by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction or any other 
federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move to approve Article 12 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 12 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for certain 
Town departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 2006 or take any other action related thereto: 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-2007 Limit 


A. Community 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 


Applicant Fees 


$40,000 


Development & 




hearing notice 






Planning 




expenses for 






Department 




permit 
applications 







T4T 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 


B. Memorial 


MHL Director 


Replacement of 


Restitution 


$20,000 


Hall Library- 




lost/damaged 


payments 




Lost/Damaged 




library materials 


/charges to 




Materials 






borrower or 
patron 




C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 


Clinic supplies 


Clinic 


$20,000 




Director 


and other 
expenses 


participant fees 




D. Division of 


Community 


Trips, ticket 


Participant fees 


$260,000 


Community 


Services 


sales and special 






Services 


Director 


programs and 
activities 






E. Division of 


Youth Services 


All programs 


Participant fees 


$175,000 


Youth Services 


Director 


and activities 
expenses, part- 
time help 






F. Field 


Plant and 


Field 


Field rental fees 


$50,000 


Maintenance 


Facilities 
Director 


maintenance, 
upgrade and 
related expenses 






G. Division of 


Elder Services 


Senior programs, 


Participant fees 


$200,000 


Elder Services 


Director 


classes and 
activities 






H. Public Safety 


Chief ofPolice 


Maintenance and 
purchase of 
public safety 
radio and 
antennae 
equipment 


Lease 

agreements for 
antenna users 


$50,000 


I. Memorial 


MHL Director 


Purchase of 


Rental of 


$36,000 


Hall Library 




audio/visual 


audio/visual 




Audio/Visual 




materials 


materials 





On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 13 B, C, G, H, and 
I, Revolving Accounts, be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 13A be approved in 
the amount of $70,000. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 13D be approved in 
the amount of $300,000. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 13E be approved in 
the amount of $225,000. 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 13F be approved in 
the amount of $80,000. 

144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to create a Stabilization Fund for the purpose of funding 
future one-time unforeseen costs of the Town, and to see if the Town will vote to transfer and 
appropriate a sum of money from available funds to the Stabilization Fund in accordance with MGL 
Chapter 40, Section 5B, as amended by Chapter 46, Sections 14 and 50 of the Acts of 2003, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to create a Stabilization Fund 
for the purpose of funding future one-time or unforeseen costs of the Town, and to see if the Town will 
vote to transfer and appropriate a sum $500,000 from Free Cash to the Stabilization Fund in 
accordance with MGL Chapter 40, Section 5B, as amended by Chapter 46, Sections 14 and 50 of the 
Acts of 2003. 

Article 14 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds 
and appropriate a sum not to exceed $400,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account for 
funding accrued employee vacation and sick leave liabilities upon being eligible for retirement under 
the Andover Contributory Retirement System and terminating employment with the Town, or take any 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 15 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $400,000 from Free Cash. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to exceed 
$12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled transportation subsidy 
program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 16 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant in the amount of $12,000 from taxation. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1,1 15,000 for the purpose of paying costs 
of school buildings roof reconstruction and renovation as more fully described in the five year Fiscal 
Year 2007-201 1 Capital Improvement Program and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause(3A) of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $800,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of school buildings, roof reconstruction and renovation as more fully described 
in the five year Fiscal Year 2007-201 1 Capital Improvement Program and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7, Clause (3 A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to amend the motion sum to $1, 1 15,000. The motion passed 
by a Majority vote. 

The amended motion was Approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval at $1 ,1 1 5,000 
Selectmen Report: Approval at $ 800,000 

School Committee Report: Approval at $ 1 , 1 1 5,000 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to reduce the interest rate charged on property taxes 
deferred by eligible seniors under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5 (41 A), as 
amended by Chapter 136, Section 1 of the Acts of 2005, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Town reduce the interest 
rate charged on property taxes deferred by eligible seniors under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
59, Section 5, Clause 41A from 8% to 5% with such reduced rate to apply to taxes unused for any 
fiscal year beginning on or after July 1, 2006. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 1 of Chapter 157 of the Acts of 2005 
which would provide an accidental disability retiree who is also a veteran with an additional yearly 
benefit of $15 for each year of creditable service or a fraction thereof, up to a maximum yearly benefit 
of $300, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 19 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 2 of Chapter 157 of the Acts of 2005 
which would provide the benefit accepted in Section 1 retroactively to the retirees date of retirement, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 20 be approved as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:00 P.M., until Tuesday, 
April 25, 2006 at 7:00 P.M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 2006 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed nine hundred and fifteen (915) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by James D. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit sixty (60) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non- 
voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the 
Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer 
to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Mark Merritt and reminded voters that he would help 
them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to articles. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1,179,000 for the purpose of paying costs 
of reconstructing sidewalks within the Town as more fully described in the five year Fiscal Year 2007- 
201 1 Capital Improvement Program portion of the Town's Sidewalk Master Plan, so-called, and for 
the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and 

147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $673,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of reconstructing sidewalks within the Town as more fully described in the 
five year Fiscal Year 2007-201 1 Capital Improvement Program portion of the Town's Sidewalk 
Master Plan, so-called, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to 
meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 21 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Approval at $673,000 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town with authorize the Board of Health to enter into a Memorandum of 
Understanding with the member communities of the Greater Lawrence Coalition Emergency 
Preparedness Region 3B to provide mutual aid and assistance in responding to public health 
emergencies, on terms and conditions the Board of Health deems in the best interest of the Town, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Health 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 22 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority 
vote. 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,500,000 for the acquisition 
of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire this land 
by gift, purchase or eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7, Clause(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $900,000 be appropriated to pay 
costs of acquiring land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, that the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission are hereby 
authorized to acquire this land by gift, purchase or eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 

148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 23 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 316 NO: 228 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 

Selectmen Report: Approval at $900,000 

Conservation Committee Report: Approval 

VIRGINIA COLE AWARD 

The Moderator introduced Ted E. Tiechert, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and Debra 
Silberstein, School Committee Chairman, to present the Virginia Cole Community Service Award 
to Dorothy Bresnahan, 7 Argyle Street. Dorothy Bresnahan has been an active member of the 
Andover community for many years. She has served on the Council on Aging for nearly twenty years, 
ten of which was served as Chairman. Dorothy has also been an active member in the Haven 
organization, served as the Director of Volunteers at the Lawrence General Hospital and now 
volunteers her time at the Senior Center in the Senior Connections Intergenerational Program. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum of $596,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curbing along Highland 
Road between Salem Street and Summer Street. 

On petition of Barbara Pattullo and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $596,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curbing along 
Highland Road between Salem Street and Summer Street, and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (5) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 24 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $460,000 for the purpose of 
constructing a paved walkway on the east side of High Street from a southerly point starting at the end 
of the existing sidewalk at approximately 109 High Street and proceeding north to connect to the 
existing sidewalk at Meredith Village at the corner of High Street and Haverhill Street; and further to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain such land or easements as may be required for this paved walkway; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

On petition of Richard M. Sweitzer and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $460,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of constructing a paved walkway on the east side of High Street from a 
southerly point starting at the end of the existing sidewalk at approximately 1 09 High Street and 
proceeding north to connect to the existing sidewalk at Meredith Village at the corner of High Street 
and Haverhill Street, and for the payment of all costs incidental and related thereto; that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said 
sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause(5) of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, and, further, that the Board of Selectmen 
is authorized to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land or 
easements as may be required for this paved walkway. 

Article 25 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the 
following five (5) streets: Barron Court, Green Meadow Lane, Jordyn Lane, Stirling Street and 
Whittemore Terrace as further described below: 

A. Barron Court (formerly known as Birmingham Court), as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board entitled "DEFINTIVE CLUSTER SUBDIVISION, LAYOUT PLAN, 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS, BIRMINGHAM ESTATES", dated February 5, 2003 
(revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 14528; 

B. Green Meadow Lane , as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"LOT LAYOUT PLAN GREEN MEADOW LANE, GREENWOOD & CHANDLER 
ROADS, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS", dated September 8, 2003 and recorded in the 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 14580; 

C. Jordyn Lane , as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"DEFINTIVE PLAN SUDIVISION, JORDYN LANE ESTATES IN ANDOVER, 
MASSACHUSETTS (Essex County)", dated August 4, 2000 (revised) and recorded in the 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 13969; and 

D. Stirling Street and Whittemore Terrace , as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 
Board entitled "DEFINTIVE SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND, STIRLING WOODS, 
ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS", dated April 29, 1998 (revised) and recorded in the Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 13424; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 



150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Jordyn Lane be accepted as 
a Public Way as printed in the Warrant and that Barron Court, Green Meadow Lane, Stirling Street and 
Whittemore Terrace be WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $9,000 for a Fireworks 
Program as part of the Fourth of July Program from available funds or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On petition of Gerald H. Silverman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 27 as printed in the Warrant in 
the amount of $9,000 from Free Cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept as a gift, 
for general municipal purposes, the real property at River Park Terrace containing approximately 4,500 
square feet and as shown on Assessors' Map 139, Lot 77, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 28 as printed in the Warrant by 
a Majority vote. 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care custody and control of the lands listed 
herein to the Conservation Commission pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, and 
General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 9, for open space use pursuant to those statutes. 

10 David Drive (4.4 acres), Tax Map 155, Lot 5K, Book 2826, Page 89, Pendleton Estates 
Subdivision; 

6 Black Birch Way (2.4 acres), Tax Map 208, Parcel 7, Book 2826, Page 208, Golden Oaks 
Subdivision; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move to approved Article 29 as printed in the warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 29 to transfer the care, custody 
and control of the lands listed in the article to the Conservation Commission pursuant to the General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, and General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 9, for open space use pursuant 
to those statutes, reserving, however, to the inhabitants of the Town of Andover, in the care and 
custody of the Board of Selectmen, the right to maintain existing drainage easements and maintain 
existing grass areas within 30 feet of the public rights of way to preserve the character and appearance 
and public safety of the neighborhoods in question. 

151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1, 2006 

The amendment to was declared DEFEATED by the Moderator. A Majority Vote is Required. 

The original motion was Approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Selectmen Report: Approval without amendment 

Planning Board Report: Approval without amendment 

Conservation Committee Report: Approval without amendment 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the lands listed 
herein to the Conservation Commission pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, and 
General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 9, for open space use pursuant to those statutes. 

8 Hearthstone Place (16.80 acres), Tax Map 178, Lot 1A, Book 3547, Page 320, Hearthstone 
Village Subdivision; 

19 Hearthstone Place (26.86 acres), Tax Map 201, Parcel 17, Book 3547, Page 320, 
Hearthstone Village Subdivision; and 

10 Keystone Way (.64 acres), Tax Map 179, Parcel 38, Book 3547, Page 320, Hearthstone 
Village Subdivision; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was move to approved Article 30 as printed in the warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 30 to transfer the care, custody 
and control of the lands listed in the article to the Conservation Commission pursuant to the General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, and General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 9, for open space use pursuant 
to those statutes, reserving, however, to the inhabitants of the Town of Andover, in the care and 
custody of the Board of Selectmen, the right to maintain existing drainage easements and maintain 
existing grass areas within 30 feet of the public rights of way to preserve the character and appearance 
and public safety of the neighborhoods in question. 

The Amendment to Article 30 was Approved. 

VOTE: YES: 354 NO: 311 A Majority Vote Required 

The amended motion was APPROVED 

VOTE: YES: 616 NO: 32 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Selectmen Report: Approval without amendment 

Planning Board Report: Approval without amendment 

Conservation Committee Report: Approval without amendment 

152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $500,000 from water reserves and 
appropriate $500,000 for the purpose of replacing and/or cleaning old water mains including costs 
incidental and related or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to approve Article 31 as printed in the Warrant in 
the Amount of $500,00 from Water Reserves by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to exceed $1,000,000 from 
unexpended water and sewer articles to fund the replacement of water meters or take any action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to by a Majority vote to transfer and appropriate 
the sum of $1,000,000 from unexpended water and sewer articles to fund the replacement of water 
meters as follows: 



Article 18, 1985 Sewer Mains 


$303,413.18 


Article 20, 1999 Sewer Plans- 
West Andover 


3,160.00 


Article 31, 2000 Bridle Path 
Sewer Station 


1,582.40 


Article 13, 2000 Sewer Mains- 
West Andover 


7,148.86 


Article 37, 1987 Water Mains 


395,390.46 


Article 46, 1992 Water Mains 


289,305.10 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the sum of 
$500,000 for the purpose of repairing and/or replacing sanitary sewers including costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $500,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of repairing and/or replacing sanitary sewers, including the payment of any 
and all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Article 33 was APPROVED. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend Article VIII of the Andover Zoning By- 
law by deleting the following language: 

"7.4. ELDERLY HOUSING 

7.4.1. Purpose. The objectives of this section are to achieve the following public purposes: 

1 . To provide for the development and use of alternative housing and nursing care for the 
elderly in accordance with the Town's Master Plan. 

2. To create home health care, housing and other supportive services for the elderly 
population outside of an institutional setting. 

3. To encourage the preservation of open space. 

4. To provide alternative housing for the elderly that cause relatively little demand on 
Town services. 

5. To preserve the Town's residential character. 

6. To provide such accommodations in a manner harmonious with the surrounding land 
uses while protecting natural resources and open space. 

7. To provide housing which is affordable to the elderly population who are Andover 
Residents." 

and replacing it with: 

"7.4. SENIOR HOUSING 

7.4.1. Purpose . The objectives of this section are to achieve the following public purposes: 

1. To provide for the development and use of alternative housing and/or nursing care for 
persons 55 years of age or over in accordance with the Town's Master Plan. 

2. To create home health care, housing and other supportive services for the senior 
population outside of an institutional setting. 

3. To encourage the preservation of open space and the Town's residential character. 

4. To provide a type of housing which reduces a residents' burdens of property 
maintenance. 



154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

5. To promote flexibility in land use planning in order to improve site layouts and protect 
natural features. 

6. To provide such accommodations in a manner harmonious with the surrounding land 
uses while protecting natural resources and open space. 

7. To provide a less expensive means of housing for a maturing population." 
and by deleting the following language: 

"7.4.8. Independent Living Residence - Dimensional Requirements and Design Standards . 

1. The provisions of Section 7.6.2 for conversion of a one- or two- or more family 
dwelling, shall apply. 

2. Parking Requirements. The provisions of Appendix A, Table 3, Section A.5.d shall 
apply." 

and replacing it with: 

"7.4.8. Independent Living Residence (ILR) 

1. Permitted Uses 

Single family dwellings, duplex structures, and/or multifamily structures. An 
Independent Living Residence development may include common areas, a common 
dining facility, accessory structures and space for the provision of social, psychological 
and educational programs. 

2. Dimensional Requirements 

a. Minimum Lot Size. A special permit for ILR shall be permitted in a SRA, SRB and 
SRC District within a single lot containing a total area of at least 5 acres. 
Contiguous lots must be combined and shown as one lot. In the SRC District, the 
minimum lot size shall contain at least five acres of uplands. For the purposes of 
this section, uplands shall mean lot area located outside the wetland margin as 
identified on maps entitled "Wetland Areas of Andover, MA" approved by the 
Andover Conservation Commission. 

b. Unit Calculation. The number of dwelling units shall be limited to 7 units per acre 
in SRA and SRB and the number of dwelling units shall be limited to 4 units per 
acre in SRC. The area for purposes of dwelling unit calculation, shall be exclusive 
of (i.e. minus): 

i. Common Open Space (as defined in Section 7.4.8. 2.g.), 

ii. Wetland Areas, 



155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

iii. Slopes greater than 25% not included in Common Open Space 

(Area for Unit Calculation = Lot - Common Open Space -Wetland 
Areas - Slopes greater than 25% not included in Common Open Space) 

When calculating the total number of dwelling units, a fractional unit 
equal to or greater than 0.5 dwelling units shall be regarded as the next 
higher whole unit. 

The maximum number of units allowed on a lot is seventy-five (75) 
units. 

c. Building Coverage. The maximum building coverage, including accessory 
buildings and existing structures, shall not exceed thirty percent (30%) of the 
total lot for new construction or the expansion of existing structures. This 
requirement shall not apply to the reuse and renovation of existing structures 
within the existing footprint. 

d. Height. Any addition or new construction shall not exceed thirty-five (35) feet 
in height. The Planning Board may increase the height limitation to no more 
than forty (40) feet and no more than three (3) stories; taking into careful 
consideration the character of the neighborhood. This requirement shall not 
apply to the reuse and renovation of existing structures that may exceed this 
height limit. 

e. Frontage. The minimum lot frontage shall conform to the requirements of the 
district where such use is located. The Planning Board may reduce the frontage 
requirement to not less than 90 feet of frontage on a public way as part of the 
Special Permit, provided that a suitable private access road into the lot will be 
used at that location and can be constructed with the reduced frontage. 

f. Perimeter Setback. All buildings and parking areas shall be a minimum of fifty 
feet from the perimeter lot line. This provision excludes internal lot lines such 
as a lot later conveyed as common open space. Access roads, common open 
space, underground utilities, and pedestrian paths are allowed in the perimeter 
setback. The Planning Board may reduce the width of the perimeter setback to 
no less than 30 feet at appropriate locations, taking into account the character of 
the surrounding neighborhood. This section does not preclude the reuse and 
renovation of existing structures that may not meet this perimeter setback. 
When feasible, the perimeter setback shall remain in a natural state to preserve 
the visual character of the parcel being developed 

g. Common Open Space. There shall be an area of common open space equal to at 
least thirty percent (30%) of the lot. The common open space shall be 100% 
upland unless otherwise determined by the Planning Board. Such common open 
space shall either be: (i) conveyed to the Town of Andover Conservation 
Commission and accepted by the Andover Conservation Commission and Board 
of Selectmen; or (ii) conveyed to a nonprofit organization, approved by the 
Planning Board, the principal purpose of which is the conservation of open 
space for the benefit and use of the general public; or (iii) encumbered by a 
Conservation Restriction to be held by the Andover Conservation Commission 
and approved by the Secretary of Environmental Affairs in accordance with 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 184, Section 32. Each of the above 
conveyances shall allow access to the general public and be subject to the 
following permitted uses: (a) easements for the installation, repair and 
replacement of underground utilities including, but not limited to, water, sewer, 
telephone, electric, cable; (b) grading as shown on the approved plan; and (c) 
walking and bicycle paths. The application shall state which of the foregoing 
options the applicant proposes. No occupancy permit shall be issued until the 
recording at the Registry of Deeds of either (i) the conveyance to the Andover 
Conservation Commission or an approved non-profit organization, or (ii) the 
Conservation Restriction as approved by the Secretary of Environmental Affairs. 

Building and Landscape Design Standards. 

a. The application requirements of subsections 9.5.3 and 9.5.4.1 and 9.5.4.2 shall 
apply. 

b. Additional Application Requirements: 

i. An Existing Conditions Site Plan that identifies the existing topography, 

site features worthy of preservation, existing dwellings, and any 
noteworthy natural, scenic and cultural resources. The Planning Board 
may require the plan to show mature vegetation such as trees over 24" 
caliper. 

ii. An Overlay to the Existing Conditions Site Plan that identifies the 

perimeter setback, wetlands, slopes greater than 25%, and proposed 
common open space. Noteworthy trees and vegetation shall be 
preserved and integrated into the design when possible. 

iii. A Site Plan showing the location of buildings, streets, parking areas, 
pedestrian and bicycle paths, and other built features of the development. 
The design should reflect an integrated community, with emphasis on 
consistency with the neighborhood's existing development pattern. It 
should illustrate the connections and relationships to adjacent amenities. 
All buildings shall be arranged so as to preserve visual and audible 
privacy between adjacent buildings. Walking and bicycle paths shall 
provide access to adjacent conservation lands, if any, and neighboring 
streets and sidewalks, when feasible. 

iv. A unit calculation study that illustrates total lot minus proposed common 
open space, existing wetland areas, and slopes greater than 25% not 
included in common open space. 

v. An aerial photograph of the lot and the surrounding neighborhood with 

at least a .25-mile radius. 

vi. If the project is to be phased, all phases of the proposed development 
shall be shown on a plan, the scope of each phase, and a preliminary 
timetable shall be provided. 

vii. Building elevations and a schedule of building materials shall be 
provided. Individual buildings shall be related but not identical to each 
other in design, mass, material, placement, and connection. The Planning 
Board may request sample floor plans. 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

c. Up to twenty five percent (25%) of the units may have three bedrooms; the 
remainder of the units shall have a maximum of two bedrooms per unit. For the 
purposes of this provision, each room in excess of sixty-four (64) square feet 
with a closet and an exterior window shall be considered a bedroom (excluding 
the kitchen, living room, dining room, and all bathrooms). Floor plans shall 
identify each room type. 

d. The development shall be served by the Town of Andover public water supply. 

e. All projects proposed under the ILR shall be connected to a public sewer system 
whenever possible. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Planning Board may 
allow an alternative wastewater disposal system approved under either Title 5 of 
the State Environmental Cod (310 CMR 15.000) or a wastewater disposal 
system approved as part of a groundwater discharge permit issued by the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to 314 CMR 
5.00. The alternative wastewater disposal system must comply with all 
applicable local and state wastewater bylaws and regulations, and receive 
written approval from the Andover Board of Health. 

f. All service areas, equipment, parking, sewerage facilities and recreational areas 
shall have screening. Suitable indigenous shrubs, vegetation, flora, deciduous 
shrubs and/or trees, other plant materials and fencing shall be used for screening. 

g. All utilities shall be underground. 

h. Exterior lighting shall not be detrimental to abutting properties, and shall be 

planned, installed and operated so as to best serve each building and the 
neighborhood as determined by the Planning Board. 

Parking and Circulation Design Standards 

a. There shall be an adequate safe and convenient arrangement of pedestrian 
circulation facilities, roadways, driveways, aisles, visitor and off-street parking, 
and snow disposal. 

b. One parking space for each studio and one bedroom unit and two parking spaces 
shall be provided for each two or more bedroom unit, in reasonable proximity to 
the dwelling, or in garages. Additional parking in proximity to any clubhouse or 
other facility serving the residents in common shall follow the requirements of 
Appendix A, Table 3, Table of Off-Street Parking Requirements. 

c. Driveways shall be a minimum of 18 feet to accommodate the length of a 
vehicle. 

d. The Planning Board may authorize a decrease in the number of parking spaces 
by 30% of the total number required. The reserved spaces shall be set aside and 
shall not be intended for immediate construction, but shall be properly designed 
(rough graded with loam and seed) as an integral part of the overall parking 
layout. Such spaces shall be labeled as "Reserve Parking" on the plan. Prior to 
the issuance of the first building permit the applicant shall secure the obligation 
to complete the Reserve Parking by cash, a letter of credit, or surety bond as 
determined by the Planning Board. Said security shall be returned to the 
applicant if the Reserve Parking is not required by the Planning Board 3 years 
from the date of the issuance of the first building permit. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

e. Parking facilities shall be designed with careful regard to the arrangement, 

topography, landscaping, and ease of access, and shall be developed as an 
integral part of the overall design. 

Affordability Component 

a. At least 15% of the dwelling units shall be affordable to an individual or 
household whose annual income is eighty percent (80%) or less of the area- wide 
median income as determined by the United States Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD), adjusted for household size, with income computed 
using HUD's rules for attribution of income to assets. When calculating the 
total number of affordable units, a fractional unit equal to or greater than 0.5 
affordable units shall be regarded as the next higher whole unit. 

b. The Planning Board shall ensure that each affordable unit is eligible for 
inclusion in the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community 
Development's (DHCD) Subsidized Housing Inventory for the Town of 
Andover using the DHCD's Local Initiative Program (760 CMR 45.00) or other 
program acceptable to DHCD. 

c. Affordable units shall be dispersed throughout the building(s) and shall have 
exteriors that are equivalent in design and materials to the exteriors of other 
housing units in the project, and shall also be comparable to the market-rate 
units in terms of location, size, and exterior character. 

d. Nothing in this subsection shall preclude the applicant from setting aside more 
than the required number of affordable units or from setting aside additional 
units for higher but limited income groups or from setting aside more units for 
lower-income groups. 

e. Each unit of affordable housing shall be subject to an affordable housing 
restriction which shall be a deed restriction meeting statutory requirements of 
M.G.L. c. 184, Section 31 and the requirements of this Section 7.4 which shall 
be recorded with the appropriate registry of deeds or district registry of the Land 
Court, and which contains the following: 

i. specification of the term of the affordable housing restriction which shall 

be perpetual or the longest period of time allowed by applicable laws. 

ii. the name and address of an "administering agency," as defined in 
Section 7.4.8.5.h., with a designation of its power to monitor and enforce 
the affordable housing restriction; 

iii. a description of the unit of affordable housing by address and number of 
bedrooms; 

iv. a reference to a housing marketing and resident selection plan to which 
the affordable housing is subject, and which includes an affirmative fair 
housing marketing program, including public notice and a fair resident 
selection process. The housing marketing and selection plan may 
provide for up to a 70% local preference, or such percentage otherwise 
permitted by law, for Andover residents during selection for the 
affordable housing units; the plan shall designate the household size 
appropriate for a unit with respect to bedroom size and provide that the 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

preference for such unit shall be given to a household of the appropriate 
size. For the purposes of this section "Andover residents" shall be 
defined as a current Town of Andover resident, an immediate relative of 
an Andover resident, or an employee of the Town of Andover and such 
other persons and such other persons as may be designated by the 
Planning Board. 

v. a requirement that residents will be selected at the initial sale or initial 

rental and upon all subsequent sales and rentals from a list of eligible 
households compiled in accordance with the housing marketing and 
selection plan; 

vi. a reference to the formula pursuant to which rent of a rental unit or the 
maximum resale price of a homeownership will be set; 

vii. a designation of the priority of the affordable housing restriction over 
other mortgages and restrictions, provided that a first mortgage of a 
homeownership housing unit to a commercial lender in an amount less 
than maximum resale price may have priority over the Affordable 
housing restriction if required by then current practice of commercial 
mortgage lenders as reasonably determined by the DHCD; 

viii. a requirement that only an eligible household may reside in an affordable 
housing unit and that notice of any lease or sublease of any unit of 
affordable housing shall be given to the administering agency; 

ix. a provision for effective monitoring and enforcement of the terms and 
provisions of the affordable housing restriction by the administering 
agency; 

x. the restrictions shall contain a right of first refusal by the Town of 
Andover or its designee at the restricted sale value, and a requirement 
that the owner provide notice of such right of refusal to the Town of 
Andover or its designee prior to selling the unit; 

xi. a provision that the owner[s] or manager[s] of affordable rental unit[s] 
shall file an annual report to the administering agency, in a form 
specified by that agency certifying compliance with the affordability 
provisions of this bylaw and containing such other information as may 
be reasonably requested in order to ensure affordability; and 

xii. a requirement that residents in affordable housing provide such 
information as the administering agency may reasonably request in order 
to ensure affordability and compliance with this Section 7.4. 

An administering agency which may be the Andover Housing Authority, a 
regional or local non-profit housing agency, an affordable housing trust, or other 
qualified and experienced housing entity shall be designated by the Planning 
Board. In a case where the administering agency cannot adequately carry out its 
administrative duties, such duties shall devolve to and thereafter be administered 
by a qualified housing entity designated by the Planning Board or, in the 
absence of such timely designation, by an entity designated by the DHCD. In 
any event, such agency shall ensure the following: 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

i. prices of affordable homeownership units are properly computed; rental 

amounts of affordable rental units are properly computed; 

ii. income eligibility of households applying for affordable housing is 

properly and reliably determined; 

iii. the housing marketing and resident selection plan conforms to all 
requirements and is properly administered; 

iv. sales and rentals are made to eligible households chosen in accordance 
with the housing marketing and resident selection plan with appropriate 
unit size for each household being properly determined and proper 
preference being given; and 

v. affordable housing restrictions meeting the requirements of this section 

are recorded with the proper Registry of Deeds. 

g. The applicant may, with the consent of the Planning Board, provide that in lieu 
of affordable unit(s), the applicant may contribute to the Town of Andover 
Housing Trust Fund, a cash contribution equal to the difference between the 
maximum price of an affordable unit and what the market rate sales price of the 
unit would be. The Planning Board and the applicant shall agree on the amount, 
timing and method of such payments to ensure that such payments are made. 
The funds shall be used solely by the Town of Andover for the preservation and 
creation of affordable housing in the Town of Andover solely for the benefit of 
low and moderate-income households. 

Additional Requirements 

a. No lot shown on a plan for which a permit is granted under this section may be 
further subdivided, and a notation to this effect shall be shown upon the plan. 

b. Copies shall be provided to the Planning Board of the condominium or 
homeowners' association or other legal structure formed for the operation, 
maintenance, management and enforcement of this development, including a 
master deed and bylaws of the organization before the issuance of an occupancy 
permit for any of the units in the project. 

c. All Independent Living Residence dwelling units shall be subject to an age 
restriction described in a deed, deed rider, restrictive covenant, condominium 
documents, or other document approved by the Planning Board that shall be 
recorded at the Registry of Deeds or Land Court before the issuance of an 
occupancy permit for any of the units in the project. All such documentation 
shall reference the purpose of the special permit for Independent Living 
Residence and the requirement that 1 00% of the units shall be occupied by at 
least one person who is fifty-five years of age or older (the "Qualified 
Occupant") consistent with the "Housing Laws" (as defined below); provided, 
however, that in the event of death of the Qualified Occupant(s) of a unit, or the 
foreclosure or involuntary transfer of a unit, a two year exemption shall be 
allowed to allow for the transfer of the unit to another Qualified Occupant (the 
"Age Restriction") so long as the provisions of the "Housing Laws" are not 
violated by such occupancy. The Age Restriction is intended to be consistent 
with, and is set forth in order to comply with, the Federal Fair Housing Act, 42 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

USC Section 3607(b), as amended, the regulations promulgated thereunder at 24 
CFR Section 100.300 et seq., Subpart E - Housing For Older Persons, as 
amended, and MGL c. 15 IB, Section 4 (collectively, the "Housing Laws"). 

d. The Planning Board shall provide written notice to the Inspector of Buildings 
that the premises have been built in accordance with the conditions of approval 
and according to Section 7.4.1. and 7.4.8. prior occupancy permits. 

e. The total number of Independent Living Residence dwelling units erected under 
this special permit in Andover shall not exceed 2% of the total housing units as 
calculated by the most recent decennial census for Andover at the time of 
application. 

7. Special Permit . The Planning Board may grant a special permit if it finds all of the 

following: 

a. The design standards and criteria in Section 7.4.1 Purpose and 7.4.8. 
Independent Living Residence (ILR) and Section 9.4.2 Criteria have been met; 

b. The intersections and roadways likely to be affected by the proposed 
development are of sufficient capacity and design to accommodate the proposed 
development; 

c. The proposed development encourages the preservation of open space for the 
benefit and use of the general public; 

d. The proposed development is integrated into and harmonious with the 
surrounding neighborhood; and 

e. The project provides an alternative means of housing stock in Andover." 
and in Section 10: Definitions by deleting the following language: 

"INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE: A dwelling that provides accommodations in dwelling units 
for elderly persons. These residences may include common areas, a common dining facility and space 
for the provision of social, psychological and educational programs." 

and replacing it with: 

"INDEPENDENT LIVING RESIDENCE: a dwelling unit constructed or converted for use and 
residency by at least one person who has achieved a minimum age required of fifty-five (55) years of 
age or older in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 15 IB, Section 4, Subsection 7, the Federal Fair 
Housing Act, 42 USC Section 3607(b), as amended, and the regulations promulgated thereunder at 24 
CFR Section 100.300 et seq., Subpart E - Housing For Older Persons, as amended. A development 
that contains such units may include common areas, a common dining facility, accessory structures and 
space for the provision of social, psychological and educational programs." 

and to amend Appendix A, Table 1, Section 3.1.3 Table of Use Regulations, A.5.d, under SRC, change 
from "N" to "PB". 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 
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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 34 as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 34 to delete the following 
sentence in paragraph 7. 4. 8,2., a, "In the SRC District, the minimum lot size shall contain at least five 
acres of uplands," and replace it with the following sentence: " In the SRA, SRB, and SRC Districts, 
the minimum lot size shall contain at least five acres of uplands." 

The amendment was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

A motion was made and seconded after a debate to move the question. It was APPROVED by a 
Majority vote. 

The amended motion was DEFEATED. 

VIOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to modify the current definition of "Family Dwelling 
Unit" in Article VIII, Section 10.0, Definitions, of the Zoning Bylaw, by deleting "or accessory 
building" from the definition or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 35 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, Section 10.0, Definitions, of the 
Zoning Bylaw, by adding a definition for "Contractor's Yard" as follows: 

"Contractor's Yard: A yard to allow the following uses: 

Parking of commercial vehicles and equipment either in the open or in enclosed structures; 

Building supply and fuel establishment; 

Storage of construction materials; 

Storage of earth materials; and 

Storage of demolished construction materials ready to be re-used, recycled or disposed, 

such as bricks, concrete masonry units, roofing materials, bituminous asphalt and the like." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 36 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 36 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, by transfer from available funds or 
by any combination thereto and appropriate the sum of $440,000 for the purchase of a Fire pumper, 
including costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Fire Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it moved that the sum of $440,000 be appropriated for the 
purchase of a fire pumper, including the payment of any and all other costs incidental and related 
thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the 
General Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 37 was APPROVED. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town of Andover will amend Article XII of the General By-laws of the 
Town of Andover by adding Section 42. Newsracks, Placement and Maintenance to read as follows: 

"Section 42. Newsracks, Placement and Maintenance 

I. Purpose 

The intent of this by-law is to promote the public health, safety and welfare through the 
regulation of placement, appearance and maintenance of newsracks on public ways so as to 
provide pedestrian and vehicular safety. 

II. Definitions 

As used in this by-law, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT (CBD) - a region with the same boundaries as the General 
Business District but excluding the General Business Districts located in Ballardvale and Shawsheen. 

COMPLIANCE SEAL - a self-adhesive sticker issued by the Director to the compliant applicants 
containing pertinent information which must be displayed inside every valid newsrack. 

DIRECTOR - the Director of the Public Works Department of the Town of Andover or such person as 
said Director may from time to time designate. 

NEWSRACK - any type of self-service device for the vending or free distribution of newspapers, 
periodicals or printed material. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

PUBLIC WAY - any public highway, private way laid out under authority of statute, way dedicated to 
public use, or way under the control of the Town Department of Public Works, School Department, 
Conservation Commission, or other body having like power, and any sidewalk adjacent to a public 
way. 

III. Compliance Seal 

A. Requirements. No person shall place, affix, erect, maintain or continue to maintain a 
privately or publicly owned newsrack in or on any part of a public way in any district 
outside of the Central Business District without first obtaining a Compliance Seal from 
the Director in accordance with the provisions of this by-law. No person shall place, 
affix, maintain or continue to maintain a newsrack in the Central Business District 
except as provided in Section V.D. of this by-law. All newsracks in the Central 
Business District shall be owned by the Town and may be used by applicants who 
obtain a Compliance Seal for space in Town-owned newsracks in accordance with this 
by-law. 

B. Compliance Seal. The Compliance Seal must be renewed annually for each newsrack 
and for space in Town-owned newsracks in the Central Business District. 

C. Issuing Authority. The Director shall be the issuing authority and coordinator of the 
application process and administration of this by-law. 

D. Approving Authority. The approving authority shall be the Director. The Director or 
his/her designee shall review and approve for compliance with this by-law. 

E. Application Process. Applicants must complete a written application on a form 
provided by the Director. 

F. Issuance of a Compliance Seal. Upon a finding by the Director that the applicant is in 
compliance with the provisions of this by-law, the Director shall issue a Compliance 
Seal for installation by the applicant of a privately owned newsrack or for the use of 
space in a Town-owned newsrack. The Director shall issue a Compliance Seal within 
twenty days of the Director's receipt of the completed application. All applications shall 
be approved on a first come, first serve basis by the Director. 

G. Denial of Compliance Seal. If an application for a newsrack location is denied, the 
Director shall notify the applicant within twenty days of the Director's receipt of the 
completed application. The Director shall state the specific reasons for denial. The 
applicant may reapply for a substitute alternative location without having to pay an 
additional application fee. 

H. The Director reserves the right to order by written notice to the applicant that any 
newsrack be removed from an approved location, or that materials be removed from a 
Town-owned newsrack either temporarily or permanently, in the interests of public 
safety. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

IV. Fees 

A. There shall be an application fee for each newsrack and for space in each Town-owned 
newsrack paid to the Town of Andover. This fee shall be due upon initial application 
and yearly upon annual renewal. Such fees shall be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

B. Where the Director has required newsracks to be set in corrals, or at hitching posts 
pursuant to Section V. below, additional fees shall be imposed by the Director and paid 
by the applicant to offset the Town's costs for each such corral or hitching post used by 
an applicant. 

C. The fee shall be applicable to the initial license year or any part thereof. Permits shall be 
for a term of one (1) year and shall not be assignable. Compliance Seals expire on 
December 31 of each year. 

D. Applications for renewal of Compliance Seals shall be filed with the Director no later 
than November 30 for the forthcoming year with the renewal fee. In the event that the 
application is not filed and the renewal fee is not paid by November 30, the space shall 
be forfeited. 



V. Standards 



Placement. Subject to the prohibitions contained in this section, newsracks shall be 
placed parallel to and not less than eighteen inches (18") nor more than twenty- four 
inches (24") from the edge of a curb. Newsracks so placed shall face the sidewalk, not 
the street. Newsracks placed near the wall of a building or other structure must be 
placed parallel to and not more than six inches (6") away from the wall. No 
newsrack(s) shall be affixed, erected, installed, placed, used or maintained: 

(1) at any location whereby the clear space for the passage of pedestrians is reduced 
to less than eight (8) feet in width; 

(2) within ten (10) feet of any marked, or unmarked crosswalk or handicapped 
ramp; 

(3) within ten (10) feet of any fire hydrant, fire lane, fire call box, police call box or 
other emergency facility, mail box, telephone booth or stand; 

(4) within ten ( 1 0) feet of any part of a curb return of a curb ramp or driveway; 

(5) within ten (10) feet of any traffic control signal or traffic sign; 

(6) within three (3) feet of a bicycle rack; 

(7) which in any way protrudes onto a street; 

(8) on any sidewalk immediately abutting a public school; or 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

(9) on any pervious surfaces including but not limited to grass, planting beds and 
mulched areas. 

B. Corrals and Hitching Posts. The Director may require that newsracks at locations in 
which more than three (3) are adjacent shall be set within a corral installed by the Town 
and the Director may require that newsracks at a particular location be chained to each 
other and/or to a permanent hitching post installed by the Town. The Director may 
choose the locations for corrals and hitching posts based on the history of misaligned or 
knocked over newsracks at the location, the high volume of pedestrian traffic at the 
location, or the relatively high concentration of newsracks at the location. However, 
nothing in this paragraph shall be construed to limit the locations at which corrals and 
hitching posts may be required. 

C. Size. Newsracks may not be higher than 4.5 feet. 

D. Central Business District (CBD). 

(1) Privately-owned newsracks shall not be placed within the public right-of-way, 
along the streets, thoroughfares, parkways or sidewalks in the CBD. However, 
newspapers, fliers, or printed materials may be placed in Town-owned 
newsracks in the Central Business District pursuant to this section. 

(2) Town-owned newsracks shall be placed at no more than four (4) locations 
within the CBD to be determined jointly by the Director and Planning Division. 

(3) Compliance Seals for spaces within the Town-owned newsracks shall be issued 
subject to the following conditions: 

a. Persons or entities wishing to place newspapers, fliers, handbills or other 
printed materials in the Town-owned newsracks must file an application 
on forms provided by the Director. 

b. Compliance Seals shall be issued on a first come, first serve basis. In the 
event that the Town has issued seals equal to the number of available 
spaces in the Town-owned newsracks, additional applicants will be 
placed on a waiting list. As spaces become available, additional Seals 
shall be issued and retained according to the provisions of this section. 
No publication shall be issued more than one space at each location. 

c. No logo, stickers, trademarks or other images may be attached to the 
Town-owned newsracks. 

(4) Upon removal of materials from the Town-owned newsrack, the applicant shall 
restore the space to the same condition as when the space was initially 
permitted, ordinary wear and tear excepted. The applicant shall be responsible 

for reimbursing the town for the cost of any repairs to the device resulting from 
damage by the applicant. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

(5) Materials placed in a Town-owned newsrack without a Compliance Seal 
therefore being issued, or after the expiration or revocation of a previously 
issued Compliance Seal, or materials deemed abandoned, or unclaimed, or in 
violation of any other provision of this regulation, shall be subject to 
enforcement under Section IX. 

VI. Attachment to Property 

A. Except to the extent permitted by regulations promulgated by the Director, no operator 
shall place or cause to be placed and no operator shall suffer to remain any privately 
owned newsrack chained or otherwise attached to any tree, street light post, traffic 
signal, bench, bicycle rack, trash receptacle, fence, utility pole, phone or sign. 

B. Privately-owned newsracks, when placed side by side, may be chained or otherwise 
attached to one another, provided that no group of newsracks shall extend for a distance 
of more than eight (8) feet along a curb, and a space of not less than thirty (30) feet shall 
separate each group of newsracks. 

VII. Advertising Prohibited 

It shall be unlawful for any operator to use a newsrack for exterior advertising of a product or 
publication other than the product or publication dispensed therein. 

VIII. Installation and Maintenance of Privately-Owned Newsracks 

Privately-owned newsracks shall be of a sturdy material and installed or otherwise placed and 
maintained by the applicant in accordance with the following provisions: 

A. Each newsrack shall display a Compliance Seal located inside the newsrack on the side 
or back of the newsrack. Newsracks containing no Compliance Seal are subject to 
immediate removal. 

B. Each newsrack shall be: 

(1) installed or placed on the pavement in an upright, sufficiently weighted and 
secure position; 

(2) of a type that is completely enclosed, with a self-closing door that is either self- 
latching or otherwise requires manual or mechanical release at each use; 

(3) maintained in a state of good repair and in a neat and clean condition; 

(4) maintained in a condition that is free of accumulations of outdated printed 
materials, trash, rubbish, or debris; and 

(5) handicapped accessible, as defined by the state Architectural Access Board. 

C. Each newsrack shall be regularly serviced so that: 

(1) it is kept reasonably free of graffiti;' 

168 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

(2) it is kept reasonably free of chipped, faded, peeling and cracked paint in the 
visible painted areas thereof; 

(3) it is kept reasonably free of rust and corrosion in the visible unpainted metal 
areas thereof; 

(4) the clear glass or plastic parts thereof, if any, through which the printed material 
is being dispensed are not broken and are kept reasonably free of tears, peeling 
or fading; and 

(5) the structural parts of the newsrack are not broken or unduly misshapen. 

D. Anyone disturbed by noise from the delivery of papers to any newsrack may complain 

to the Director. The Director shall forthwith notify the applicant of the complaint. The 
applicant shall contact the complainant and attempt to resolve the complaint. If the 
complaint is not resolved to the complainant's satisfaction within ten (10) days, the 
complainant may request a meeting before the Director and the applicant. After such 
meeting, the Director shall have authority to impose a reasonable resolution to the 
complaint, including ordering the relocation of the newsrack/s causing the noise 
problem. 

DC. Enforcement Procedures 

A. Nonconforming Newsracks. Any newsrack found not to be in compliance with this by- 
law shall be subject to the enforcement provisions contained herein. 

B. Abandonment. In the event that any newsrack installed or used pursuant to the 
provisions of this by-law does not contain the printed material being dispensed therein 
for a period of seventy-two (72) hours after the release of the current issue, the Director 
may deem the newsrack abandoned and take appropriate action under this by-law A 
newsrack shall otherwise be deemed abandoned if no printed material is found in the 
newsrack for a period of more than fifteen (15) consecutive days. In the event that an 
applicant voluntarily abandons a private newsrack location, the applicant shall so notify 
the Director, completely remove the newsrack and restore the public way to a safe 
condition. In the event that an applicant voluntarily abandons space in a Town-owned 
newsrack, the applicant shall so notify the Director and shall remove all materials 
therefrom. 

C. Noncompliance with annual renewal. It is the responsibly of the applicant to renew the 
Compliance Seal yearly. 

D. Enforcement. 

(1) Enforcement of the provisions of this by-law shall be carried out by the Director. 
Upon a determination that a violation of any provision of this by-law exists the 



169 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Director shall notify the applicant of the violation in writing by first class mail. 
The notice shall include: 

a. the location of the newsrack; 

b. the date of the incident or other cause giving rise to the 
violation; and 

c. a brief and concise statement of the facts causing the violation. 

(2) The notice shall inform the applicant that at the expiration often (10) days from 
the issuance of the violation notice, the newsrack will be removed by the 
Director or, in the case of a Town-owned newsrack, the materials will be 
removed therefrom, unless the violation is corrected. 

(3) Upon removal of a newsrack, the Director shall send, by first-class mail, written 
notice of such removal to the applicant. Notwithstanding the provisions of the 
foregoing paragraphs 1(a) - 1(c) of this section, the Director may order the 
immediate removal of any newsrack (s) that the Director determines presents an 
imminent threat or peril to public safety, provided that the applicant shall be 
notified of such removal as soon as practicable thereafter, and further provided 

that any newsrack so removed shall be stored a period of thirty (30) days in 
order to allow the applicant to retrieve the newsrack. If the Director removes a 
newsrack under this section (4) which does not have a Compliance Seal, the 
Director shall dispose of the newsrack at the end of the thirty-day period. 

X. Fees for Removal and Storage 

A. A newsrack removed pursuant to this by-law may be retrieved by the applicant within 
thirty (30) days of its removal upon payment of a removal and storage fee. Such fees 
shall be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

B. After thirty (30) days, any newsracks and/or materials removed by the Director pursuant 
to Section IX of this by-law shall be deemed "abandoned property" and become the 
property of the Town of Andover. 

C. Failure of an applicant to retrieve a newsrack within the specified thirty-day period shall 
not operate to dismiss any fees owed to the Town for removal and storage of such 
newsrack. Unpaid fees accrued pursuant to this Section X. shall be considered a debt 
payable to the Town. 

XI. Regulations 

The Director may, with the approval of the Town Manager, promulgate such rules and 
regulations consistent with the provisions of this by-law and the laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as shall carry out the purposes of this by-law. 



170 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

XII. Effect on Other Laws 

Nothing in this Chapter shall affect the adoption of regulations affecting newsracks by other 
government bodies, such as historic district commissions; to the extent such bodies are 
authorized to adopt such regulations. 

XIII. Severability 

The provisions of this by-law shall be severable and if any section, part, or portion hereof shall 
be held invalid for any reason by any court, the decision of such court shall not affect or impair 
any remaining section, part or portion thereof. 

XIV. Effective Dates 

Application for Compliance Seals for privately owned newsracks will be accepted after 
October 1, 2006. All existing privately owned newsracks are not required to have 
a Compliance Seal until January 1, 2007. The effective date of this bylaw for town owned 
newsracks in the Central Business District, as outlined in Section V.D., shall be January 1, 
2008." 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

On request of the Main Street Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 38 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 53E'/2, for the purpose of establishing a Newsrack Maintenance Revolving 
Account for maintenance, upkeep, purchase and other expenses relating to newsracks in the Town of 
Andover for Fiscal Year 2007, such expenses to be funded by revenues collected by application and 
renewal fees, and to authorize the Director of the Department of Public Works to make expenditures in 
an amount not to exceed S25,000 for FY-2007, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 39 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town by repealing 
Article XIV (Wetlands Protection Bylaw). 

On petition of Michael C. Gillis and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 40 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to close debate by a Majority vote. 

Article 40 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

171 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

VOTE: YES: 338 NO: 457 

Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Planning Board Report: Disapproval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:00 P.M., until Monday, May 
1, 2006 at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 1, 2006 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed three hundred and two (302) voters were admitted 
to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by James D. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty- three (23) non- voters to the meeting and to escort 
non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the 
Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer 
to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the Ombudsman, Mark Merritt and reminded voters that he would help 
them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator reminded the meeting members that at the beginning of the meeting on April 24 it was 
voted by a Majority vote that a time limit of five minutes would be imposed during the 2006 Town 
Meeting for presenters and that audience speakers would be limited to three minutes. Speakers 
needing additional time may appeal to the Moderator for more time. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $25,000 by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing for the 
replacement of wooden posts and chain at Ballard Vale Green with granite posts and permanent- 
finished chain, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 41 was approved by a Majority vote in the amount of 
$25,000 from Free Cash. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



172 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from and appropriate $900,000 from 
the balance of the Town's Tip Fee Stabilization Fund and any other funds received from the 
dissolution of the North East Solid Waste Committee, to be used with others funds to be provided by 
gift, grant or otherwise for the purpose of constructing the utilities, parking and other portions of the 
infrastructure necessary to meet Town requirements in connection with the construction of a Youth 
Center, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 42 by a Majority vote. 

On petition of Gerald H. Silverman and others 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of 
continuing the capping of the Town landfill on Ledge Road including making any improvements to the 
area and any other costs incidental and related thereto and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (24) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $500,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs for the design, engineering, testing and permitting for the capping and closure 
of the Town landfill on Ledge Road and the payment of any and all other costs incidental and related 
thereto and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (24) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

Article 43 was APPROVED 

VOTE: YES: 260 NO: 11 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to: 

1. Authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to amend the Town's Charter by 
adding at the end of the first sentence of Section 5 the words "except the Audit Committee"; 
and 

2. Amend Article III Section 4 (1), (2) and (3) of the Town General By-Laws by adding at the end 
of each sub-section "except the Audit Committee", and adding the following to the Town 
General By-Laws: 

"Article III Section 5. Audit Committee. 

A. The Audit Committee shall consist of seven members. The Board of Selectmen, School 
Committee and Finance Committee shall annually each appoint one of its members to 
serve on the Audit Committee. The Town Moderator shall appoint four residents with 

173 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1. 2006 

financial expertise to serve two-year terms. The chair of the Audit Committee shall be 
selected by majority vote of the Committee. Members shall be eligible for 
reappointment. 

B. The primary responsibilities of the audit committee are to oversee the independent audit 
of the Town's financial statements, including recommending the selection of the 
independent auditor to the Town Manager; the evaluation of the independent audit 
scope; and the resolution of audit findings. 

C. The Audit Committee will present an annual report to the Board of Selectmen 
indicating how the Committee has discharged its responsibilities." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Committee 

Article 44 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw pursuant to Section 
2.3 (District Boundaries) and make the appropriate changes to the Zoning Map of Andover, Mass. To 
re-zone to Office Park (OP) from Single Family Residence B (SRB) the parcel of land situated on the 
southerly side of Haverhill Street owned by Merrimack College designated by the Town of Andover as 
175 Haverhill Street and comprising Assessor Parcel 1-5 on Assessor Map 1, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of Merrimack College and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 45 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the sum of 
$450,000 for the purpose of paying for the replacement of HVAC units in Town and School buildings 
including costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $450,000 be appropriated for the 
purpose of paying costs of replacing HVAC units in Town and School buildings, including the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3 A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 46 was APPROVED 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

174 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $69,000 from off-street parking 
receipts and appropriate $69,000 for the purpose of purchasing and installing a pay-and-display unit at 
the Shawsheen Square lot, an electric vehicle replacement for parking enforcement and a message 
board, including costs incidental and related or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 47 was approved as printed in the warrant in the amount 
of $69,000 from off-street parking receipts by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to declare surplus 
and available disposition and to transfer the fee interest in the land shown as Parcel B, containing 
1,036 square feet, more or less, on Plan of Land entitled "Plan of Land Buxton Court, Andover, MA, 
January 11, 2006, J. M. Associates, N. Reading, MA 01864", a copy of which is on file with the 
Office of the Town Clerk, which is a portion of Town property situated on Buxton Court, in 
consideration of the transfer of the land shown as Parcel A on said Plan, containing 1,034 square feet, 
more or less, to the Town, and on such terms and conditions the Board of Selectmen deem in the best 
interests of the Town, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain , gift, 
purchase or otherwise, the fee interest in the land shown as Parcel A, containing 1,034 square feet, 
more or less, on Plan of Land entitled "Plan of Land Buxton Court, Andover, MA, January 11, 2006, J. 
M. Associates, N. Reading, MA 01864", a copy of which is on file with the Office of the Town Clerk, 
which is a portion of the property at 98 North Main Street, on terms and conditions the Board of 
Selectmen deem in the best interests of the Town, and to appropriate the sum of Thirteen Thousand 
($13,000) Dollars for such acquisition, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to request the 
Legislature to enact special legislation to authorize the Town to acquire and transfer such land, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 48 as printed in the warrant in 
the amount of $13,000 from Free Cash. 

Article 48 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 



175 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw, Section 2.3 
(District Boundaries) and make the appropriate changes to the zoning maps of Andover, Mass., to re- 
zone to Mixed Use from SRA land shown as Parcel A, containing 1,034 square feet, more or less, on a 
Plan of Land entitled, "Plan of Land Buxton Court, Andover, MA, January 1 1, 2006, J. M. Associates, 
N. Reading, MA 01 864", a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk, and to re-zone to SRA from 
Mixed Use the land shown as Parcel B, containing 1,036 square feet, more or less, on said Plan of 
Land referred to above. Said parcels of land are also shown as a portion of Lot 31 and a portion of Lot 
32 on Town of Andover's Assessors' Map 38, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 49 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 49 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 8.1.2 of the Zoning Bylaw by amending 
the second sentence to read: 

"The district includes all areas designated on the plan titled "Fish Brook/Haggetts Pond 
Watershed Protection Overlay District", dated December 1985, prepared by the Town Engineer, as 
amended, and also as amended by the plan titled "Topographic Plan Requested Revision to Watershed 
Protection Overlay District River Road, Andover, MA, dated January 19, 2006" prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc., for Richard and Kay Pelletier, 176 River Road, Andover, MA 01810, which plans are on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and which are hereby made part of the Town Zoning Maps." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey, Jr. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 50 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 50 was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority 
vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 8:45 P.M. 



176 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2006 

A true record 
ATTEST 




^U^L^ 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



177 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MA 3/28/2006 





PCTl 


per 2 


PCT3 


per 4 


per 5 


per 6 


per 7 


per 8 


per 9 


Totals 


MODERATOR 






















JAMES D DOHERTY 


232 


200 


225 


188 


197 


209 


227 


268 


239 


1985 


Blanks 


70 


59 


59 


55 


36 


60 


85 


85 


71 


580 


Misc. Others 


1 


5 


3 


1 


7 


6 


4 


5 


13 


45 


Totals 


303 


264 


287 


244 


240 


275 


316 


358 


323 


2610 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 






















BRIAN P MAJOR 


177 


143 


155 


139 


148 


164 


241 


220 


204 


1591 


TED E TEICHERT 


195 


165 


216 


151 


132 


181 


165 


244 


206 


1655 


JOSEPH V LEONE 


138 


126 


116 


114 


128 


116 


108 


117 


135 


1098 


Blanks 


96 


91 


85 


83 


72 


86 


117 


134 


95 


859 


Misc. Others 





3 


2 


1 





3 


1 


1 


6 


17 


Totals 


606 


528 


574 


488 


480 


550 


632 


716 


646 


5220 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






















ARTHUR H BARBER 


130 


116 


141 


121 


103 


156 


217 


155 


164 


1303 


ANTHONY H JAMES 


153 


125 


146 


123 


133 


131 


137 


196 


169 


1313 


ANN S WELD 


161 


135 


145 


115 


128 


112 


109 


187 


154 


1246 


ROBERT G. COFFILL, JR. 


38 


30 


31 


34 


44 


51 


47 


44 


53 


372 


Blanks 


124 


121 


103 


94 


71 


100 


121 


128 


106 


968 


Misc. Others 





1 


8 


1 


1 





1 


6 





18 


Totals 


606 


528 


574 


488 


480 


550 


632 


716 


646 


5220 


GR. LAWRENCE REGIONAL 






















KENNETH T HAMILTON 


108 


114 


120 


92 


91 


90 


118 


124 


120 


977 


GERALD H SILVERMAN 


147 


109 


136 


118 


112 


124 


106 


148 


150 


1150 


Blanks 


48 


41 


30 


34 


37 


61 


92 


86 


53 


482 


Misc. Others 








1 




















3 


Totals 


303 


264 


287 


244 


240 


275 


316 


358 


323 


2612 


ANDOVER HOUSING 






















DANIEL T GRAMS 


229 


191 


216 


164 


177 


183 


206 


247 


228 


1841 


Blanks 


74 


70 


71 


80 


62 


92 


110 


111 


94 


764 


Misc. Others 





3 








1 











1 


5 


Totals 


303 


264 


287 


244 


240 


275 


316 


358 


323 


2610 


PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 






















EARL G EFINGER 


172 


137 


176 


121 


126 


134 


140 


180 


163 


1349 


DONNA C ELLSWORTH 


176 


138 


170 


122 


132 


142 


153 


192 


182 


1407 


ERIC STUBENHAUS 


177 


125 


170 


114 


132 


131 


158 


185 


170 


1362 


JOHN H ATCHISON, JR 


167 


124 


160 


106 


126 


124 


126 


174 


146 


1253 


NORMAN C FROST 


160 


136 


147 


114 


129 


124 


124 


180 


144 


1258 


Blanks 


663 


660 


610 


643 


555 


718 


877 


879 


809 


6414 


Misc. Others 








2 








2 


2 





1 


7 


Totals 


1515 


1320 


1435 


1220 


1200 


1375 


1580 


1790 


1615 


13050 



178 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/19/2006 

Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















EDWARD M KENNEDY 


492 


392 


430 


285 


336 


323 


382 


448 


398 


3486 


Blanks 


105 


91 


126 


101 


114 


111 


117 


136 


116 


1017 


Misc. Others 


7 


5 


8 


4 


3 


4 


4 


8 


5 


48 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


GOVERNOR 






















CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL! 


158 


150 


178 


134 


160 


167 


165 


185 


177 


1474 


DEVAL L PATRICK 


370 


257 


299 


190 


234 


219 


272 


319 


271 


2431 


THOMAS F REILLY 


72 


78 


80 


65 


59 


50 


65 


84 


71 


624 


Blanks 


4 


3 


6 


1 





2 


1 


3 





20 


Misc. Others 








1 














1 





2 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















DEBORAH B GOLDBERG 


181 


190 


184 


158 


140 


163 


149 


186 


171 


1522 


TIMOTHY P MURRAY 


195 


147 


184 


100 


155 


113 


169 


195 


157 


1415 


ANDREA C SILBERT 


154 


115 


137 


97 


100 


116 


126 


136 


138 


1119 


Blanks 


74 


36 


58 


35 


57 


45 


59 


73 


53 


490 


Misc. Others 








1 





1 


1 





2 





5 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















MARTHA COAKLEY 


463 


382 


409 


298 


329 


314 


372 


415 


386 


3368 


Blanks 


139 


105 


153 


90 


122 


122 


130 


175 


133 


1169 


Misc. Others 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 





14 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















WILLIAM F GALVIN 


428 


357 


392 


278 


315 


308 


360 


395 


372 


3205 


JOHN BONIFAZ 


70 


57 


76 


49 


58 


64 


60 


100 


64 


598 


Blanks 


104 


74 


96 


63 


80 


66 


83 


97 


83 


746 


Misc. Others 


2 


























2 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


TREASURER 






















TIMOTHY P CAHILL 


430 


355 


395 


283 


308 


306 


365 


401 


358 


3201 


Blanks 


173 


131 


169 


107 


142 


132 


138 


189 


161 


1342 


Misc. Others 


1 


2 








3 








2 





8 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


AUDITOR 






















A JOSEPH DeNUCCI 


401 


348 


373 


266 


298 


296 


344 


380 


354 


3060 


Blanks 


202 


135 


191 


123 


154 


142 


159 


211 


165 


1482 


Misc. Others 


1 


5 





1 


1 








1 





9 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















MARTIN T MEEHAN 


463 


371 


414 


287 


336 


314 


373 


430 


387 


3375 


Blanks 


137 


113 


147 


98 


114 


123 


127 


159 


132 


1150 


Misc. Others 


4 


4 


3 


5 


3 


1 


3 


3 





26 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


COUNCILLOR 






















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


374 


323 


337 


234 


267 


260 


318 


335 


307 


2755 


Blanks 


230 


165 


227 


155 


185 


178 


185 


255 


212 


1792 


Misc. Others 











1791 


1 








2 





4 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 



SUSAN C TUCKER 


499 


410 


442 


311 


354 


346 


407 


464 


405 


3638 


Blanks 


105 


77 


119 


78 


97 


91 


96 


126 


114 


903 


Misc. Others 





1 


3 


1 


2 


1 





2 





10 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARBARA A LTTALIEN 


480 

















383 


455 





1318 


Blanks 


124 

















118 


135 





377 


Misc. Others 




















2 


2 





4 


Total votes 


604 

















503 


592 





1699 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARRY R FINEGOLD 





379 


419 


312 


357 


334 








399 


2200 


Blanks 





106 


145 


77 


95 


102 








119 


644 


Misc. Others 





3 





1 


1 


2 








1 


8 


Total votes 





488 


564 


390 


453 


438 








519 


2852 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















JONATHAN W BLODGETT 


379 


327 


344 


242 


277 


275 


330 


358 


319 


2851 


Blanks 


225 


161 


220 


148 


175 


163 


173 


233 


200 


1698 


Misc. Others 














1 








1 





2 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


CLERK OF COURTS 






















THOMAS H DRISCOLL JR 


384 


319 


354 


248 


278 


273 


325 


355 


322 


2858 


Blanks 


220 


168 


210 


142 


174 


165 


177 


236 


196 


1688 


Misc. Others 





1 








1 





1 


1 


1 


5 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 






















ARTHUR J BROADHURST 


188 


130 


133 


99 


69 


97 


149 


207 


108 


1180 


ROBERT F KELLEY 


322 


310 


360 


242 


320 


275 


274 


293 


324 


2720 


Blanks 


94 


47 


71 


49 


64 


65 


79 


92 


87 


648 


Misc. Others 





1 











1 


1 








3 


Total votes 


604 


488 


564 


390 


453 


438 


503 


592 


519 


4551 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/19/2006 



Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 



Totals 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















KENNETH G CHASE 


23 


10 


16 


18 


12 


17 


15 


14 


21 


146 


KEVIN P SCOTT 


35 


31 


22 


25 


21 


13 


21 


24 


24 


216 


Blanks 


4 


10 


4 


4 





6 


6 


5 


6 


45 


Misc. Others 











1 

















1 


Total votes 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


GOVERNOR 






















KERRY HEALEY 


58 


42 


38 


43 


32 


31 


32 


38 


43 


357 


Blanks 


4 


9 


3 


5 


1 


3 


9 


5 


7 


46 


Misc. Others 








1 








2 


1 





1 


5 


Total votes 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 






















REED V HILLMAN 


51 


39 


32 


39 


31 


32 


30 


34 


40 


328 


Blanks 


11 


12 


10 


9 


2 


4 


12 


8 


11 


79 


Misc. Others 























1 





1 


Total votes 


62 


51 


42 


48 


. 33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 



180 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

LARRY FRISOLI 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

TREASURER 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

AUDITOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

REP. IN CONGRESS 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

COUNCILLOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 



52 


45 


31 


37 


28 


31 


31 


34 


33 


322 


10 


6 


11 


11 


5 


4 


11 


9 


18 


85 

















1 











1 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


41 


48 


33 


36 


41 


43 


50 


405 








1 











1 





1 


3 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


41 


43 


50 


406 




















1 





1 


2 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


41 


43 


51 


407 




















1 








1 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 
































62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 
































62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 
































62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















LAWRENCE BRENNAN 


44 

















27 


29 





100 


Blanks 


18 

















15 


14 





47 


Misc. Others 
































Total votes 


62 

















42 


43 





147 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 





51 


42 


48 


33 


36 








51 


261 


Misc. Others 
































Total votes 





51 


42 


48 


33 


36 








51 


261 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















Blanks 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


Misc. Others 
































Total votes 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 


CLERK OF COURTS 






















Blanks 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


41 


42 


51 


406 


Misc. Others 




















1 


1 





2 


Total votes 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 



181 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Total votes 



62 


46 


42 


45 


31 


36 


41 


42 


49 


394 





5 





3 


2 





1 


1 


2 


14 


62 


51 


42 


48 


33 


36 


42 


43 


51 


408 



182 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 11/07/2006 

Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS 



EDWARD M KENNEDY 


933 


802 


952 


742 


851 


815 


897 


959 


884 


7835 


KENNETH G CHASE 


510 


543 


559 


518 


588 


628 


588 


675 


584 


5193 


Blanks 


49 


50 


49 


57 


38 


54 


57 


42 


42 


438 


Misc. Others 


1 





3 


3 


1 


7 





3 


1 


19 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


GOVERNOR & LT. GOVERNOR 






















HEALEY & HILLMAN 


581 


636 


640 


630 


717 


774 


683 


798 


695 


6154 


PATRICK & MURRAY 


821 


653 


820 


600 


655 


625 


741 


773 


707 


6395 


MIHOS & SULLIVAN 


59 


74 


62 


68 


73 


72 


92 


74 


68 


642 


ROSS & ROBINSON 


24 


22 


33 


12 


29 


24 


18 


25 


30 


217 


Blanks 


7 


10 


7 


9 


3 


9 


5 


6 


10 


66 


Misc. Others 


1 





1 


1 


1 





3 


3 


1 


11 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 






















MARTHA COAKLEY 


1009 


882 


1034 


831 


894 


869 


952 


1024 


905 


8400 


LARRY FRISOLI 


429 


452 


475 


422 


512 


558 


517 


588 


534 


4487 


Blanks 


54 


58 


54 


66 


71 


74 


73 


67 


72 


589 


Misc. Others 


1 


3 





1 


1 


3 











9 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


SECRETARY OF STATE 






















WILLIAM F GALVIN 


1042 


986 


1113 


935 


998 


1025 


1096 


1165 


1044 


9404 


JILL E STEIN 


272 


232 


256 


202 


275 


263 


229 


270 


261 


2260 


Blanks 


177 


174 


190 


182 


200 


204 


211 


235 


204 


1777 


Misc. Others 


2 


3 


4 


1 


5 


12 


6 


9 


2 


44 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


TREASURER 






















TIMOTHY P CAHILL 


1076 


992 


1122 


933 


1021 


1024 


1102 


1172 


1058 


9500 


JAMES O'KEEFE 


209 


208 


215 


191 


238 


245 


208 


246 


211 


1971 


Blanks 


206 


193 


221 


194 


216 


226 


228 


249 


238 


1971 


Misc. Others 


2 


2 


5 


2 


3 


9 


4 


12 


4 


43 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


AUDITOR 






















A JOSEPH DeNUCCI 


1034 


955 


1063 


887 


1008 


998 


1038 


1142 


1021 


9146 


RAND WILSON 


204 


228 


245 


225 


235 


250 


263 


247 


237 


2134 


Blanks 


253 


210 


252 


208 


234 


249 


236 


283 


250 


2175 


Misc. Others 


2 


2 


3 





1 


7 


5 


7 


3 


30 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















MARTIN T MEEHAN 


1068 


979 


1118 


909 


1069 


996 


1076 


1147 


1069 


9431 


Blanks 


406 


388 


416 


399 


391 


468 


440 


490 


425 


3823 


Misc. Others 


19 


28 


29 


12 


18 


40 


26 


42 


17 


231 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 



183 



COUNCILLOR 



MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


821 


700 


825 


618 


729 


696 


762 


818 


730 


6699 


TIMOTHY P HOUTEN 


386 


459 


453 


445 


484 


487 


475 


527 


486 


4202 


Blanks 


286 


235 


283 


257 


263 


321 


304 


331 


293 


2573 


Misc. Others 





1 


2 





2 





1 


3 


2 


11 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















SUSAN C TUCKER 


1164 


1068 


1217 


982 


1119 


1097 


1167 


1274 


1146 


10234 


Blanks 


320 


319 


335 


328 


352 


389 


368 


384 


359 


3154 


Misc. Others 


9 


8 


11 


10 


7 


18 


7 


21 


6 


97 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARBARA A LTTALIEN 


979 

















889 


1022 





2890 


LAWRENCE BRENNAN 


469 

















592 


614 





1675 


Blanks 


43 

















54 


43 





140 


Misc. Others 


2 

















7 








9 


Total votes 


1493 

















1542 


1679 





4714 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARRY R FINEGOLD 





1047 


1167 


976 


1109 


1058 








1121 


6478 


Blanks 





337 


379 


329 


362 


420 








383 


2210 


Misc. Others 





11 


17 


15 


7 


26 








7 


83 


Total votes 





1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 








1511 


8771 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 






















JONATHAN W BLODGETT 


1019 


955 


1057 


883 


988 


934 


1034 


1103 


1004 


8977 


Blanks 


467 


434 


497 


434 


482 


551 


503 


559 


503 


4430 


Misc. Others 


7 


6 


9 


3 


8 


19 


5 


17 


4 


78 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


CLERK OF COURTS 






















THOMAS H DRISCOLL JR 


1023 


951 


1058 


886 


987 


937 


1035 


1086 


999 


8962 


Blanks 


462 


439 


497 


432 


486 


551 


503 


579 


509 


4458 


Misc. Others 


8 


5 


8 


2 


5 


16 


4 


14 


3 


65 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 






















ROBERT F KELLEY 


1077 


1015 


1116 


949 


1046 


983 


1061 


1151 


1045 


9443 


Blanks 


408 


376 


437 


368 


425 


507 


476 


516 


463 


3976 


Misc. Others 


8 


4 


10 


3 


7 


14 


5 


12 


3 


66 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


QUESTION 1 






















YES 


632 


606 


647 


608 


794 


672 


731 


782 


688 


6160 


NO . 


787 


731 


843 


669 


673 


791 


768 


829 


785 


6876 


Blanks 


74 


58 


73 


43 


11 


41 


43 


68 


38 


449 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 


QUESTION 2 






















YES 


441 


410 


444 


418 


488 


430 


488 


503 


426 


4048 


NO 


883 


837 


963 


788 


905 


956 


923 


1030 


961 


8246 


Blanks 


169 


148 


156 


114' 


85 


118 


131 


146 


124 


1191 


Total votes 


1493 


1395 


1563 ] 


[84320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 



QUESTION 3 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total votes 



587 


532 


586 


479 


535 


493 


555 


572 


532 


4871 


757 


723 


815 


727 


847 


894 


846 


958 


846 


7413 


149 


140 


162 


114 


96 


117 


141 


149 


133 


1201 


1493 


1395 


1563 


1320 


1478 


1504 


1542 


1679 


1511 


13485 



185 



Questions: November 7, 2006 

QUESTION 1: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 
Representatives before May 3, 2006? 
SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow local licensing authorities to issue licenses for food stores to sell wine. 
The proposed law defines a "food store" as a retail vendor, such as a grocery store, supermarket, shop, 
club, outlet, or warehouse-type seller, that sells food to consumers to be eaten elsewhere (which must 
include meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, fresh fruit and produce, and other specified either on its own 
or together with any other items they sell. 

The licensing authorities m any city or town of up to 5000 residents could issue up to 5 licenses for food 
stores to sell wine. In cities or towns of over 5000 residents, one additional license could be issued for 
each additional 5000 residents (or fraction of 5000). No person or business could hold more than 10% of 
the total number of the licenses that could be issued under the proposed law. Such licenses would not be 
counted when applying the laws that limit the number of other kinds of alcoholic beverage licenses that 
may be issued or held. Any applicant for a license would have to items), and that may sell other items 
usually found in grocery stores. Holders of licenses to sell wine at food stores could sell wine be 
approved by the state Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, and any individual applicant would have 
to be at least 21 years old and not have been convicted of a felony. 

In issuing any licenses for food stores to sell wine, local licensing authorities would have to use the 
same procedures that apply to other licenses for the retail sale of alcoholic beverages. Except where the 
proposed law has different terms, the same laws that apply to issuance, renewal, suspension and 
termination of licenses for retail sales of alcoholic beverages which are not to be consumed on the seller's 
premises, and that apply to the operations of holders of such licenses, would govern licenses to sell wine 
at food stores, and the operation of holders of such licenses. Local authorities could set fees for issuing 
and renewing such licenses. 

A YES VOTE would create a new category of licenses for food stores to sell wine, and it would allow 
local licensing authorities to issue such licenses. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning the sale of wine. 

QUESTION 2: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 

Representatives before May 3, 2006? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow candidates for public office to be nominated by more than one 
political party or political designation, to have their names appear on the ballot once for each nomination, 
and to have their votes counted separately for each nomination but then added together to determine the 
winner of the election. 

The proposed law would repeal an existing requirement that in order to appear on the state primary ballot 
as a candidate for a political party's nomination for certain offices, a person cannot have been enrolled in 
any other party during the preceding year. The requirement applies to candidates for nomination for 
statewide office, representative in Congress, governor's councillor, member of the state Legislature, 
district attorney, clerk of court, register of probate, register of deeds, county commissioner, sheriff, and 
county treasurer. The proposed law would also allow any person to appear on the primary ballot as a 
candidate for a party's nomination for those offices if the party's state committee gave its written consent. 
The proposed law would also repeal the existing requirement that in order to be nominated to appear as an 
unenrolled candidate on the state election ballot, or on any city or town ballot following a primary, a 
person cannot have been enrolled in any political party during the 90 days before the deadline for filing 
nomination papers. 



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The proposed law would provide that if a candidate were nominated by more than one party or political 
designation, instead of the candidate's name being printed on the ballot once, with the candidate allowed 
to choose the order in which the party or political designation names appear after the candidate's name, 
the candidate's name would appear multiple times, once for each nomination received. The candidate 
would decide the order in which the party or political designation nominations would appear, except that 
all parties would be listed before all political designations. The ballot would allow voters who vote for a 
candidate nominated by multiple parties or political designations to vote for that candidate under the party 
or political designation line of their choice. 

If a voter voted for the same candidate for the same office on multiple party or political designation 
lines, the ballot would remain valid but would be counted as a single vote for the candidate on a line 
without a party or political designation. If voting technology allowed, voting machines would be required 
to prevent a voter from voting more than the number of times permitted for any one office. 

The proposed law would provide that if a candidate received votes under more than one party or 
political designation, the votes would be combined for purposes of determining whether the candidate had 
won the election. The total number of votes each candidate received under each party or political 
designation would be recorded. Election officials would announce and record both the aggregate totals 
and the total by party or political designation. 

The proposed law would allow a political party to obtain official recognition if its candidate had 
obtained at least 3% of the vote for any statewide office at either of the two most recent state elections, 
instead of at only the most recent state election as under current law. 

The proposed law would allow a person nominated as a candidate for any state, city or town office to 
withdraw his name from nomination within six days after any party's primary election for that office, 
whether or not the person sought nomination or was nominated in that primary. Any candidate who 
withdrew from an election could not be listed on the ballot for that election, regardless of whether the 
candidate received multiple nominations. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in 
effect. 

A YES VOTE would allow a candidate for public office to be nominated for the same office by more than 
one political party or political designation at the same election. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning nomination of candidates for public office. 

QUESTION 3: Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of 

Representatives before May 3, 2006? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would allow licensed and other authorized providers of child care in private homes 
under the state's subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the relevant state agencies 
about all terms and conditions of the provision of child care services under the state's child care 
assistance program and its regulations. 

Under the proposed law, these family child care providers who provide state-subsidized child care 
would not be considered public employees, but if 30% of the providers gave written authorization for an 
employee organization to be their exclusive representative in collective bargaining, the state Labor 
Relations Commission would hold a secret mail ballot election on whether to certify that organization as 
the exclusive representative. Parts of the state's public employee labor relations law and regulations 
would apply to the election and collective bargaining processes. The proposed law would not authorize 
providers to engage in a strike or other refusal to deliver childcare services. 



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An exclusive representative, if certified, could then communicate with providers to develop and present a 
proposal to the state agencies concerning the terms and conditions of child care provider services. The 
proposed law would then require the parties to negotiate in good faith to try to reach a 
binding agreement. If the agreed-upon terms and conditions required changes in existing regulations, the 
state agencies could not finally agree to the terms until they completed the required procedures for 
changing regulations and any cost items agreed to by the parties had been approved by the state 
Legislature. If any actions taken under the proposed law required spending state funds, that spending 
would be subject to appropriation by the Legislature. Any complaint that one of the parties was refusing 
to negotiate in good faith could be filed with and ruled upon by the Labor Relations Commission. An 
exclusive representative could collect a fee from providers for the costs of representing them. 

An exclusive representative could be de-certified under Commission regulations and procedures if 
certain conditions were met. The Commission could not accept a decertification petition for at least 2 
years after the first exclusive representative was certified, and any such petition would have to be 
supported by 50% or more of the total number of providers. The Commission would then hold a secret 
mail ballot election for the providers to vote on whether to decertify the exclusive representative. 

The proposed law states that activities carried out under it would be exempt from federal anti-trust 
laws. The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the other parts would stay in 
effect. 

A YES VOTE would allow licensed and other authorized providers of childcare in private homes under 
the state's subsidized child care system to bargain collectively with the state. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the laws concerning licensed and other authorized family 
childcare providers. 



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WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 



TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 





Alex J. Vispol 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 




Reginald 
Town Manager 






Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does: 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon: 



Name and Address (Optional) 



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